PREP Program Represented at AAPM Scientific Meeting

PREP AAPM 2016 speakers

L-R Marta Illueca, Heather Tick, Elvira Lange, Beth Murinson Hogans

by Pamela Katz Ressler, MS, RN, HNB-BC, faculty Pain Research, Education and Policy Program, Tufts University School of Medicine, and PREP-Aired blog moderator

The American Academy of Pain Medicine recently held a scientific meeting with several PREP-affiliated presenters. The topic “Non-pharmacological/Integrative Therapies: Pearls” was moderated by former PREP student,  Heather Tick, MD, of the University Washington, Seattle.

The panel featured current PREP student, Marta Illueca, MD, sharing insights on spirituality and religion-based therapies across the continuum of pain and suffering; as well as PREP guest lecturer, Beth Murinson Hogans, MD discussing evidence-based recommendations for acupressure versus trigger-point massage.

Current PREP student Marta Illueca presenting at AAPM Scientific Meeting

Current PREP student Marta Illueca presenting at AAPM Scientific Meeting

Additionally, Elvira Lange, MD  introduced evidence-based hypnotic techniques in acute care settings to the audience.

The Pain Research, Education and Policy Program (PREP) is exceptionally proud that program’s  director and co-founder, Dan Carr, MD  is currently serving as the president of the American Academy of Pain Medicine, furthering the mission of the PREP program: “To champion an interprofessional educational program that addresses the multidimensional public health burden of pain by preparing diverse learners to contribute with expertise and compassion to pain research, education and policy.”

L-R Beth Murinson Hogans, Libby Bradshaw (Academic Director, PREP), Marta Illueca, Elvira Lange, Heather Tick, Dan Carr (Director and co-Founder PREP)

L-R Beth Murinson Hogans, Libby Bradshaw (Academic Director, PREP), Marta Illueca, Elvira Lange, Heather Tick, Dan Carr (Director and co-Founder PREP)

 

Add comment April 25th, 2016

Communicating the Experience of Chronic Pain and Illness through Blogging

When one thinks of chronic or persistent pain one often thinks in terms of the biologic pathways of pain perception.  However, an important component of pain involves of the psychosocial aspects of coping with a chronic illness.  Disciplines across the health professions, including medicine, nursing, psychology, social work, and sociology, are actively engaged  in understanding the psychosocial and emotional consequences of chronic pain and illness: Yet few studies have addressed the  use of web-based tools, such as blogs, in the patient experience of living with chronic pain or illness.

Four Tufts University School of Medicine faculty members, Pamela Katz Ressler (Pain Research, Education and Policy Program), Libby Bradshaw (Pain Research, Education and Policy Program), Lisa Gualtieri (Health Communications Program), and Kenneth Chui (Public Health and Community Medicine) from the Tufts University School of Medicine in the Department of Public Health and Community Medicine recently published the results from a  formative research study,  Communicating the Experience of Chronic Pain and Illness through Blogging, in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.

The goal of this research was to explore the use of patient illness blogs as a means of communicating the experience of chronic pain  and illness and to articulate the unique set of benefits and barriers of blogging.  Qualitative data from 230 current illness bloggers were collected and analyzed to better understand the self-perceived psychosocial and health effects associated with the blogging activity. Results suggest that blogging about chronic pain and illness may decrease a sense of isolation through the establishment of online connections with others and increases a sense of purpose to help others in similar situations. While the authors’ acknowledge the study limitations, they are hopeful that further research will be conducted to explore the observed associations between communicating the experience of chronic pain through blogging and patients’ coping and self-efficacy when living with chronic pain or illness.

To read the full paper, Ressler, PK; Bradshaw, YS; Gualtieri, L ; Chui, KKH: Communicating the Experience of Chronic Pain and Illness through Blogging,  in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, please click here.

 

1 comment December 11th, 2012


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