Norwegian Study: Pain Assessment and Management Key in Helping Alzheimer’s Patients

by Wendy Williams, BSN, M.Ed., Associate Director of the Pain Research, Education and Policy Program (PREP),  Tufts University School of Medicine

The evidence continues to mount that proactive pain management makes a difference in lives (in this case, for both the identified patient and the staff and families that care for them in nursing homes).

A research article was published in the British Medical Journal on July 17th and concludes the following: “A systematic approach to the management of pain significantly reduced agitation in residents of nursing homes with moderate to severe dementia. Effective management of pain can play an important part in the treatment of agitation and could reduce the number of unnecessary prescriptions for psychotropic drugs in this population.”

You can listen to a BBC journalist interviewing one of the authors here.   This problem has been outlined before; the challenge of good pain assessment in the non-verbal.  In particular, a 2006 Web-MD article reviews a study done in Australia by Leonie J. Cole and colleagues entitledPain a Problem in Alzheimer’s Disease: Undertreated Pain Plagues Alzheimer’s Patients Who Hurt, but Can’t Tell.

Have you heard of any good studies recently?  We need to keep promoting evidence based practice and advocacy for people with undertreated pain…. Hope to hear from you on any news you might have on this front.

Add comment July 18th, 2011


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