National Pain Strategy Announced by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

by Pamela Katz Ressler, MS, RN, HNB-BC, faculty Pain Research, Education and Policy Program, Tufts University School of Medicine, and PREP-Aired blog moderator

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has announced the federal government’s first coordinated plan for addressing the immense burden of pain that affects millions of adults and children in the United States. The National Pain Strategy (NPS) is a direct result of recommendations put forth in the 2011 Institute of Medicine’s report, Blueprint for Transforming Pain, Prevention, Care, Education and Research, calling for a cultural transformation in pain prevention, care and education as well as recommending a comprehensive population health-level strategy.

Dr. Daniel Carr

Patients, patient advocates, researchers, and pain-related professional groups such as the American Academy of Pain Medicine (AAPM) played an instrumental role in the development of the National Pain Strategy (NPS). Participants included Dr. Daniel Carr, the director of the Pain Research, Education and Policy Program (PREP) at Tufts University School of Medicine and the current president of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. In discussing the importance of the National Pain Strategy and its relevance to the public health crisis surrounding opioid abuse, Dr. Carr stated “The NPS is comprehensive and far-reaching in scope. The other influential pain report released within days of the NPS — CDC’s Guideline on Opioid Prescribing — extends current efforts focused upon reducing opioid abuse. I believe the opioid epidemic will be brought under control, in large part through public and professional education about the broad spectrum of options for treating pain, as advocated in the NPS. As the opioid epidemic recedes, patients, health care professionals, and policy makers will look to the NPS for guidance on enduring, systems-level solutions to improving the assessment, treatment and prevention of pain–and reducing disparities in access to quality pain care.”

The Pain Research, Education and Policy program at Tufts will continue to lead the way in training leaders in the comprehensive field of pain, working to reduce the burden of pain and suffering for individuals, families and society.

 

Add comment March 24th, 2016

Unintended Consequences

by Pamela Katz Ressler, MS, RN, HNB-BC, Faculty, Pain Research, Education and Policy Program, Tufts University School of Medicine, moderator of PREP-Aired Blog

The PREP program congratulates faculty member Carol Curtiss, MSN, RN-BC on the publication of her article, I’m Worried About People in Pain, in the American Journal of Nursing ( AJN, Jan 2016, Vol 1Carol Curtiss, MSN, RN16, No. 1).  Carol skillfully argues that while both chronic pain and prescription drug abuse are public health crises in the U.S., efforts to address opioid abuse may lead to unintended consequences for people who suffer with persistent pain and benefit from responsible use of opioids as part of a comprehensive treatment plan.  As we tackle the complex public health crisis of prescription abuse through regulation and policy, we must also remain cognizant of the needs of those who suffer from chronic pain by including pain clinicians and patients at the health policy table.

Add comment March 22nd, 2016


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