New Release: Approaches to Pain Management with foreward by Daniel Carr, MD, FABPM

by Pamela Katz Ressler, RN, BSN, HN-BC, MS-PREP graduate student and PREP-AIRED blog moderator

Untreated or under-treated pain causes needless suffering and negatively affects the quality of life. That is why the management of pain remains a critical area of health care and why the concept is addressed throughout the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) requirements. 

We congratulate the Tufts University School of Medicine’s Pain Research, Education and Policy Programs co-founder, Daniel Carr, MD, FABPM for providing the forward to the newly published second edition of Approaches to Pain Management: An Essential Guide for Clinical Leaders  

Approaches to Pain Management: An Essential Guide for Clinical Leaders, published by the Joint Commission Resources, provides an overview of pain assessment and management, identifies what the standards require regarding the treatment of patients with pain, and offers guidance on making pain management an integral part of care services.   Dr. Carr, an internationally recognized expert in pain management, provides both perspective and vision on the complex nature of pain.

The majority of the book is devoted to the best practices of health care institutions that have adopted focused pain programs. This updated guide also incorporates a global view of pain management, additional organizational best practices—including some from non-U.S. institutions.  Other features include the following:

  • Summaries of every Joint Commission and Joint Commission International pain assessment and management requirement across all health care settings
  • Strategies for identifying and using evidence-based medicine resources for pain management
  • Expanded case study chapters from clinical leaders describing how their organizations developed and implemented their pain management activities
  • Techniques and ideas for understanding and meeting pain-related standards
  • Guidance on committing an organization to pain management improvements

For more information about  the newly released edition of Approaches to Pain Management: An Essential Guide for Clinical Leaders, click here 

 

Add comment November 29th, 2010

The Pain Research, Education, and Policy Programs at Tufts University Welcome Wendy Williams

By Pamela Katz Ressler, RN, BSN, HN-BC, MS-PREP graduate student and PREP-AIRED blog moderator

You may see a new face if you are on the Tufts University School of Medicine campus in Boston these days.  Wendy Williams, BSN, M.Ed, is in a new role with the Pain Research, Education and Policy Programs at Tufts University School of Medicine, focusing on program development and administration. I recently had the opportunity to sit down with Wendy to ask her a few questions about herself and her visions for the PREP programs.  

Welcome Wendy…Can you tell us a bit about yourself?

I just arrived at Tufts from spending 8 years at Northeastern University in the School of Nursing working to ensure high quality clinical nursing education placements for both the undergrad/pre-licensure students and the advanced practice students seeking both clinical and non-clinical nursing master’s degrees.   My own clinical nursing background centers around oncology and HIV/AIDS.    I spent wonderful years at both Dana Farber Cancer Institute, during the time they had inpatient units, and at Harvard Community Health Plan/Harvard Vanguard with other highly skilled nurses on the HIV/AIDS Resource Team.I married a great guy back in 1996 who had a couple of sweet little boys who are now terrific college age young men, studying here in Boston.  My husband, Jeff, and I live in Framingham with our 3-legged cat, Punky, and hairless dog, Diddy.

What interests you about the PREP programs?

The concern for under-treated pain and pain management are steady threads that ran throughout my own clinical practice.  Ensuring adequate pain management is a strong cornerstone of quality nursing care and practice, so the PREP programs of study are very attractive to me and tie together much of what I value.  The chance to work collaboratively with the three program leaders (who are also physicians), Dr. Dan Carr and Dr. Richard Glickman-Simon and Dr. Ylisabyth Bradshaw, is an opportunity I want to leverage.I have long sought ways to be a force behind strengthening linkages between medicine and nursing and other health care disciplines to encourage both multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to health care.  The PREP programs present an ideal setting to have broad-based conversations around the area of pain issues.  Also, my own master’s degree is in education, specializing in adult and organizational learning, so .  the opportunity to develop a program of study and optimize learning for students globally is a really strong draw for me to be here at Tufts working with the PREP programs.

What do you see as the strengths and challenges of the PREP program?

A real strength of the PREP programs is its unique position in masters level education  that delves deeply into the many physical/clinical, social and scientific aspects of pain.  There is not a population of people, worldwide, that is not impacted by pain issues.  Also, the fact that the PREP programs are not solely clinically based creates a rich learning environment for many types of students… clinicians seeking to be subject matter experts in pain issues learn side by side with non-clinicians who may be seeing the PREP programs as a way to become well-informed advocates for pain issues.  After about a month in this role, I see two challenges to the PREP programs that I would like to positively impact.  One challenge is getting more and more people in the greater Boston area to know about this great set of programs and to become students in the program.  I happen to know one graduate of the program, Hallie Greenberg, a nurse from the Brigham & Women’s Hospital, and know that there are so many others that would be really inspired to become proficient in this area.  The other challenge is understanding and communicating to others clear linkages between getting one of the certificates and/or the master’s degree and a specific career enhancement.  There seems to be a certain pioneering element to encouraging students to go for the certificates or the degree as a natural next step in career growth.

What are your hopes and vision for the PREP program?

I hope that PREP grows steadily, both in numbers and in innovative educational initiatives, and sustainably with input from all communities of interest: students and alumni and staff and our steering committee and faculty and leaders in pain issues globally.  I would love to speak with students and alumni and gain their insights on how we can best lead the way in pain research, education and policy.  I welcome calls, 617 636-0815, emails wendy.williams@tufts.edu, or simply stop by my office in the M&V building, Room 142A. I’d love to meet you.

Add comment November 15th, 2010

Love Induced Pain Relief

By Pamela Katz Ressler, RN, BSN, HN-BC, MS-PREP graduate student and PREP-AIREDLove Induced Pain Relief blog moderator

Thank you to Tufts University School of Medicine, MS-PREP alumna Nancy Mitchell for forwarding this intriguing study from Stanford University School of Medicine on love induced pain relief.  In their study, Dr. Sean Mackey and colleagues suggest that intense, passionate feelings of love can alter the perception of pain. 

“When people are in this passionate, all-consuming phase of love, there are significant alterations in their mood that are impacting their experience of pain,” said Sean Mackey, MD, PhD, chief of the Division of Pain Management, associate professor of anesthesia and senior author of the study. “We’re beginning to tease apart some of these reward systems in the brain and how they influence pain. These are very deep, old systems in our brain that involve dopamine — a primary neurotransmitter that influences mood, reward and motivation.”

While love is not the only answer to relieving pain, it appears that similar areas of the brain are activated by intense love and also by pain relieving pharmaceuticals.  Further study of the neural reward pathways  that are triggered by intense feelings of passion could lead to a more complete undertanding of the neural mechanisms involved in the pain experience.

Click here to read the complete study

Add comment November 9th, 2010

We Have a Winner: PREP-AIRED

by Pamela Ressler, RN, BSN, HN-BC, MS-PREP student and PREP blog moderator
Thanks to all who participated in the Name Our Blog contest. The entries we received were exceptionally creative and clever, and made choosing a winner extremely difficult for the selection committee. The winning entry, PREP-AIRED was submitted by PREP student Eileen Dube. When asked how she came up with the blog name PREP-AIRED, Eileen stated,

“Basically I thought that the name PREP-AIRED conveyed the idea that in the Pain Research Education and Policy program we are airing our ideas. By airing them we are better prepared to answer questions of others, to think more deeply about things, to see things from a different perspective, and to act. And I love a good play on words any day.”

Congratulations, Eileen!
Here are some of the other great entries we received:
Melzack’s Echo: To recognize Melzack’s pioneering efforts towards pain research, as well the residual echo of its impact
Polemos on Poena: The Greek word for war and the Latin word for pain, preparing us to do battle with pain in our collective work
PPP/Triple P (Pain Program Posting): Recognizing the interactive nature of postings on the blog
Painless: Acknowledging our desire to mitigate pain
We were struck by the thought and creativity, as well as the relevance to the unique PREP program, that went into each of the name submissions. Thank you to all who participated.
Over the next week you will see a new blog heading graphic with the new name: PREP-AIRED, and you will continue to see new content added. The beauty of a blog is the collaborative nature of interaction with others; we welcome and depend on your continued comments and ideas. I am happy to help you post your thoughts or give you suggestions on topics that may be of interest. Feel free to email me at pressler@stressresources.com

Add comment March 29th, 2009

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