PREP Capstone Presentations

by Pamela Katz Ressler, RN, BSN, HN-BC, MS-PREP graduate student and PREP-AIRED blog administrator and moderator

Congratulations to two MS-PREP candidates who recently presented their capstone projects to a group of faculty, alumni and students of the Tufts University School of Medicine’s Pain Research, Education and Policy Programs and the New England School of Acupuncture

Kai-Yin Hsu investigated the clinical use of the MYMOP form and outcome of acupuncture treatment from a U.S. traditional Chinese Medicine teaching clinic.

Pratchi Morajkar conducted a systematic review of Dexmedetomidine and its implications for non-narcotic-based analgosedation in cardiac surgery.

Prachi Morajkar, Dr. Libby Bradshaw, PREP academic director, Kai-Yin Hsu

Both presentations reflect the diverse interests and broad scope of the Tufts University Pain Research, Education and Policy Programs.

Kai-Yin Hsu presenting her PREP capstone project

2 comments January 13th, 2011

A New Year…What Advances in Pain Management Will We See in 2011?

by Pamela Katz Ressler, RN, BSN, HN-BC, MS-PREP graduate student and PREP-AIRED Blog Administrator and Moderator

As we enter a new year, pain is still the #1 reason individuals seek out medical care (American Pain Foundation data).  Those who are involved in research, as well as direct caregivers of patients, know that pain is complex and needs to be addressed by a multi-modal and interdisciplinary approach.  Let’s take stock of where we are and where we hope to go in 2011.  We invite you to comment, discuss and brainstorm ways that we can more effectively manage pain on this site  Let’s envision a day when pain is no longer the #1 reason individuals seek medical care.

Happy New Year…may your year be filled with opportunities and possbilities.

Add comment January 3rd, 2011

Progress and Challenges in Pain Research

By Pamela Katz Ressler, RN, BSN, HN-BC, MS-PREP graduate student, PREP-AIRED blog moderator and administrator

Thank you to Dr. Daniel Carr, founder of the Tufts University School of Medicine’s Pain Research Education and Policy Programs (PREP) for alerting us to a collection of articles in a recent edition of Nature Medicine which review progress and challenges in pain research from the bench to the bedside.  Take a look at some of the interesting issues being addressed with a focus on pain research and treatment.

Click here to view the table of contents

Add comment December 10th, 2010

New Release: Approaches to Pain Management with foreward by Daniel Carr, MD, FABPM

by Pamela Katz Ressler, RN, BSN, HN-BC, MS-PREP graduate student and PREP-AIRED blog moderator

Untreated or under-treated pain causes needless suffering and negatively affects the quality of life. That is why the management of pain remains a critical area of health care and why the concept is addressed throughout the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) requirements. 

We congratulate the Tufts University School of Medicine’s Pain Research, Education and Policy Programs co-founder, Daniel Carr, MD, FABPM for providing the forward to the newly published second edition of Approaches to Pain Management: An Essential Guide for Clinical Leaders  

Approaches to Pain Management: An Essential Guide for Clinical Leaders, published by the Joint Commission Resources, provides an overview of pain assessment and management, identifies what the standards require regarding the treatment of patients with pain, and offers guidance on making pain management an integral part of care services.   Dr. Carr, an internationally recognized expert in pain management, provides both perspective and vision on the complex nature of pain.

The majority of the book is devoted to the best practices of health care institutions that have adopted focused pain programs. This updated guide also incorporates a global view of pain management, additional organizational best practices—including some from non-U.S. institutions.  Other features include the following:

  • Summaries of every Joint Commission and Joint Commission International pain assessment and management requirement across all health care settings
  • Strategies for identifying and using evidence-based medicine resources for pain management
  • Expanded case study chapters from clinical leaders describing how their organizations developed and implemented their pain management activities
  • Techniques and ideas for understanding and meeting pain-related standards
  • Guidance on committing an organization to pain management improvements

For more information about  the newly released edition of Approaches to Pain Management: An Essential Guide for Clinical Leaders, click here 

 

Add comment November 29th, 2010

Love Induced Pain Relief

By Pamela Katz Ressler, RN, BSN, HN-BC, MS-PREP graduate student and PREP-AIREDLove Induced Pain Relief blog moderator

Thank you to Tufts University School of Medicine, MS-PREP alumna Nancy Mitchell for forwarding this intriguing study from Stanford University School of Medicine on love induced pain relief.  In their study, Dr. Sean Mackey and colleagues suggest that intense, passionate feelings of love can alter the perception of pain. 

“When people are in this passionate, all-consuming phase of love, there are significant alterations in their mood that are impacting their experience of pain,” said Sean Mackey, MD, PhD, chief of the Division of Pain Management, associate professor of anesthesia and senior author of the study. “We’re beginning to tease apart some of these reward systems in the brain and how they influence pain. These are very deep, old systems in our brain that involve dopamine — a primary neurotransmitter that influences mood, reward and motivation.”

While love is not the only answer to relieving pain, it appears that similar areas of the brain are activated by intense love and also by pain relieving pharmaceuticals.  Further study of the neural reward pathways  that are triggered by intense feelings of passion could lead to a more complete undertanding of the neural mechanisms involved in the pain experience.

Click here to read the complete study

Add comment November 9th, 2010

Do Cortisone Injections Make Pain Worse?

cortisone injectionby Pamela Katz Ressler, RN, BSN, HN-BC, MS-PREP graduate student and PREP-AIRED blog moderator

A recent study published by The Lancet (to read the study abstract, click  here ) explores the question of efficacy and safety of corticosteroid injections for tendinopathy, both short-term and long-term. Using a systematic review of randomized control studies, researchers observed that corticosteroid injections reduced pain in the short term compared with other interventions, but this effect was reversed at intermediate and long terms.  

As this research indicates, there is a need for multidisciplinary pain management approaches in the treatment of chronic pain conditions.  What have been your experiences with using corticosteroid injections?

Add comment November 2nd, 2010

MS-PREP August 2010 Capstone Presentations

by Pamela Katz Ressler, RN, BSN, HN-BC, MS-PREP student and PREP-AIRED blog moderator

 

August 11, 2010 marked the culmination of intensive research and planning for two candidates for Master’s degrees in the Pain Research, Education and Policy Program at the Tufts University School of Medicine with the presentation of their capstone projects.

Margaretta Elizabeth (Beth) Sangree, a student in the joint program with the New England School of Acupuncture (NESA), presented her capstone project entitled

PREP%20August%202010.jpg

Pictured L-R: Ylisabyth (Libby) Bradshaw, DO, MS, Associate Director of the Pain Research, Education and Policy Program; Margaretta Elizabeth (Beth) Sangree, MS-PREP candidate, Richard Glickman-Simon, MD, Director of the Pain Research, Education and Policy Program; and Sherry Brink, RN, BSN, MS-PREP candidate

“Measures of the Patient-Provider Relationship in Acupuncture Treatments”. Beth highlighted several studies that support the importance of relationship-centered care in effective pain treatment. Future directions will include quanitfiable, replicable, randominzed control studies to continue to document the effect of patient-provider relationship on treatment effectiveness.

Sherry Brink, RN, BSN, presented her capstone project on “Post-Op Pain Management in the Pediatric Patient” with emphasis on bringing best practices of post-op pain managment to underserved, international patient populations. Sherry recounted her experience bringing comprehensive pain management methods to a small rural hospital in the Andes mountains of Peru and her development and integration of a bilingual nursing education module on pain management currently being used by the staff in Peru. Sherry hopes to use her MS-PREP degree to further her international medical mission work by continuing to educate nurses worldwide in effective, compassionate pain management methods.

Congratulations to these two exceptional MS-PREP degree candidates!

Add comment August 23rd, 2010

International Job Opportunity in Pain Research

by Pamela Katz Ressler, RN, BSN, HN-BC, MS-PREP student, PREP-AIRED blog moderator
MS-PREP alumna, Anne Colyn, sent along the following job posting for a Pain Research Co-ordinator in the United Kingdom. It sounds very applicable and may be of interest to MS-PREP graduates. The job is located at the University of Bath in the United Kingdom and has an application deadline of April 9, 2010, so don’t delay in checking it out! Click on the link below for more information:
http://www.bath.ac.uk/jobs/Vacancy.aspx?ref=JK23

Add comment April 5th, 2010

PREP Program International Networking

Luxembourg%20and%20Bruges%202010%20051%20%282%29.JPG
by Pamela Katz Ressler, RN, BSN, HN-BC, MS-PREP student and PREP-AIRED blog moderator
One of the aspects of the Pain Research Education and Policy program at Tufts University Medical School that I find so enriching is the diversity of the students, faculty and alumni. The interdisciplinary nature of the program, as well as the international mix of the students helps to create a global community of pain management experts and an ever expanding network of colleagues. I was able to use my Tufts PREP program connections recently by networking with MS-PREP alum Anne Colyn in Luxembourg where she is now living. We had an interesting discussion of the role of integrative modalities of pain management in Europe.

Add comment April 1st, 2010

We Have a Winner: PREP-AIRED

by Pamela Ressler, RN, BSN, HN-BC, MS-PREP student and PREP blog moderator
Thanks to all who participated in the Name Our Blog contest. The entries we received were exceptionally creative and clever, and made choosing a winner extremely difficult for the selection committee. The winning entry, PREP-AIRED was submitted by PREP student Eileen Dube. When asked how she came up with the blog name PREP-AIRED, Eileen stated,

“Basically I thought that the name PREP-AIRED conveyed the idea that in the Pain Research Education and Policy program we are airing our ideas. By airing them we are better prepared to answer questions of others, to think more deeply about things, to see things from a different perspective, and to act. And I love a good play on words any day.”

Congratulations, Eileen!
Here are some of the other great entries we received:
Melzack’s Echo: To recognize Melzack’s pioneering efforts towards pain research, as well the residual echo of its impact
Polemos on Poena: The Greek word for war and the Latin word for pain, preparing us to do battle with pain in our collective work
PPP/Triple P (Pain Program Posting): Recognizing the interactive nature of postings on the blog
Painless: Acknowledging our desire to mitigate pain
We were struck by the thought and creativity, as well as the relevance to the unique PREP program, that went into each of the name submissions. Thank you to all who participated.
Over the next week you will see a new blog heading graphic with the new name: PREP-AIRED, and you will continue to see new content added. The beauty of a blog is the collaborative nature of interaction with others; we welcome and depend on your continued comments and ideas. I am happy to help you post your thoughts or give you suggestions on topics that may be of interest. Feel free to email me at pressler@stressresources.com

Add comment March 29th, 2009

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