PREP Alumni and Faculty Happenings

Among MS-PREP alumni/ae, Hallie Greenberg is redesigning templates for patient-controlled IV and epidural analgesia at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital to enhance quality and safety of pain relief.  Gretchen Kindstedt is working with the Massachusetts Pain Initiative in its legislative outreach, and is on track to earn a second Master’s degree from our department – an MPH — in 2014. Ian Koebner is employed at the Pain Treatment Center at University of California at Davis, dividing his time between clinical acupuncture and interprofessional pain education.  Jessica Peck is growing her acupuncture practice in Maine.  Along with her MS-PREP Capstone preceptor, Jessica will teach at the 7th Annual Palliative Care Conference at Maine Medical Center in Portland in June.  Heather Thomson, working in Health Outcomes and Pharmacoeconomics at Endo, recently conducted a claims analysis with collaborators in New Mexico on the prevalence of chronic pain in patients with pulmonary disease, and will report the findings in 3 abstracts and 2 papers.

Among Certificate alumni/ae, Elizabeth Carpino is now Program Coordinator for ChildKind International.  Based at Boston Children’s Hospital and led by Neil Schechter (whose PREP lecture on ChildKind is viewable at our website), this program improves pediatric pain management worldwide by certifying healthcare institutions according to process and quality measures.  Kathleen Norris is pursuing further studies to be credentialed as both an Adult and a Geriatric Nurse Practitioner, with the goal of positively impacting long-term care pain management practices and policies.

Among PREP faculty, Academic Director Libby Bradshaw has now overseen conversion of 4 PREP courses to a blended onsite/online format. Kudos to Libby, the Course Directors (Richard Glickman-Simon, Ewan McNicol, Pam Ressler and Steve Scrivani), their excellent TAs (Ali Carter, Kelly Murphy and Phuong Nguyen) and the students embarking on this new approach.  Dan Carr recently testified on behalf of the American Society of Anesthesiologists at an FDA workshop on possible relabeling of opioid package inserts, and was elected VP for Scientific Affairs of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. Srdjan Nedeljkoviccontinues work on the BOLD (Back Pain Longitudinal Data) study evaluating outcomes of management of elderly patients with back pain. As Director of the Brigham and Women’s Pain Medicine fellowship, Serge will accept the Fellowship Excellence Award from the American Academy of Pain Medicine at its annual meeting in April. Pam Ressler attended the Narrative Medicine Workshop at Columbia University, led by Rita Charon, a national figure and pioneer in this area. Pam looks forward to using tools of narrative medicine to engage her students next summer in PREP232 (Ethical and Sociocultural Aspects of Pain).

Add comment February 14th, 2013

2013 Sackler Lecture: Dr. Scott Fishman

by Pamela Katz Ressler, MS, RN, HN-BC, adjunct faculty, Pain Research, Education and Policy (PREP), Tufts University School of Medicine

The Pain Research, Education and Policy Program (PREP) is honored to present the Annual Sackler Lecture with guest speaker, Scott M. Fishman, MD, chief, Division of Pain Medicine and Professor of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine (School of Medicine, University of California-Davis), on Thursday, January 31, 4:00-5:00 PM in the Wolff Auditorium at Tufts Medical Center (800 Washington St, Boston).

Dr. Fishman, a world-renowned authority on pain management, will lecture on the subject of interprofessional and competency-based education for clinicians managing pain. Chronic, or persistent pain, is not only a personal health issue, but a public health and economic challenge for our country.  It is estimated that chronic pain costs the United States economy over $635 billion annually due to medical care and lost productivity. Yet, we are not adequately addressing this societal burden.  As pain management has evolved over the past decades, it has become apparent that a multi-modal and interprofessional approach to pain is necessary.  However, interprofessional pain management is often underutilized for many factors, one being a paucity of interdisciplinary educational opportunities for clinicians. Training our health care professionals to manage pain in an interprofessional model will allow for our health care system to effectively care for the increasing numbers of individuals suffering from chronic or persistent pain. The need for increased interprofessional training in pain management was recently highlighted in the Institute of Medicine’s 2011 report:  Relieving Pain in America: A Blueprint for Transforming Prevention, Care, Education, and Research. In addition to his clinical work at UC-Davis, Dr. Fishman serves as a co-principal investigator of the Interprofessional Pain Management Competencies Working Group of the Mayday Fund.

The Pain Research Education and Policy Program invites students, alumni, health care professionals, clinical staff and faculty,  health communicators, public health advocates, and others to join us for Dr. Fishman’s informative and engaging lecture, immediately followed by an interprofessional panel discussion.

For more information about the event, click here

Add comment January 21st, 2013

Communicating the Experience of Chronic Pain and Illness through Blogging

When one thinks of chronic or persistent pain one often thinks in terms of the biologic pathways of pain perception.  However, an important component of pain involves of the psychosocial aspects of coping with a chronic illness.  Disciplines across the health professions, including medicine, nursing, psychology, social work, and sociology, are actively engaged  in understanding the psychosocial and emotional consequences of chronic pain and illness: Yet few studies have addressed the  use of web-based tools, such as blogs, in the patient experience of living with chronic pain or illness.

Four Tufts University School of Medicine faculty members, Pamela Katz Ressler (Pain Research, Education and Policy Program), Libby Bradshaw (Pain Research, Education and Policy Program), Lisa Gualtieri (Health Communications Program), and Kenneth Chui (Public Health and Community Medicine) from the Tufts University School of Medicine in the Department of Public Health and Community Medicine recently published the results from a  formative research study,  Communicating the Experience of Chronic Pain and Illness through Blogging, in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.

The goal of this research was to explore the use of patient illness blogs as a means of communicating the experience of chronic pain  and illness and to articulate the unique set of benefits and barriers of blogging.  Qualitative data from 230 current illness bloggers were collected and analyzed to better understand the self-perceived psychosocial and health effects associated with the blogging activity. Results suggest that blogging about chronic pain and illness may decrease a sense of isolation through the establishment of online connections with others and increases a sense of purpose to help others in similar situations. While the authors’ acknowledge the study limitations, they are hopeful that further research will be conducted to explore the observed associations between communicating the experience of chronic pain through blogging and patients’ coping and self-efficacy when living with chronic pain or illness.

To read the full paper, Ressler, PK; Bradshaw, YS; Gualtieri, L ; Chui, KKH: Communicating the Experience of Chronic Pain and Illness through Blogging,  in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, please click here.

 

1 comment December 11th, 2012

Pain as a Top-Down Phenomenon: a Bibliography

by Daniel B. Carr, MD, FABPM, FFPMANZCA (Hon.), Director, Pain Research, Education and Policy (PREP) Program, Tufts University School of Medicine

Since its inception in 1999, a single concept has unified PREP’s curriculum and connected its community. This theme is that the study of pain is best accomplished if it is seen as a top-down (i.e., population-based) public health phenomenon as noted in the 2011 IOM Report on Pain.  We are fortunate that PREP has always been situated within the Department of Public Health and Community Medicine and grateful that its Chairs and Deans — Harris Berman and Aviva Must — have shared this view and continually encouraged PREP’s growth.

Advances in pain research and education, particularly as informed by the emerging field of social neuroscience, have made PREP’s vision more and more timely.  Reflecting the broader pain community’s growing awareness of PREP’s distinctive voice, this year I’ve had the privilege of delivering keynote addresses at congresses of the American Pain Society, the Special Interest Group on Pain Education of the International Association for the Study of Pain, and the American Society of Pain Educators’ PAINWeek. The specifics of each talk differed somewhat but all conveyed PREP’s underlying theme.

In response to requests from attendees at these lectures, I have assembled an interim bibliography to allow anyone interested to become better informed about some of the sources that the PREP program draws upon. Reflecting PREP’s interprofessional, eclectic outlook, many are from the humanities and social sciences, complemented by the biomedical literature.  For example, according to the narrator in the novel by Greer, “I do not know what joins the parts of an atom, but it seems what binds one human to another is pain”.

Those who wish to immerse themselves in our curriculum will enroll in a course or one of our certificate or degree programs. Click here to find out more about taking a course.  Following the great success this summer of PREP 233 (End of Life and Palliative Care, directed by Pam Ressler) in a blended onsite-online format, our foundational course PREP 230 is the next of our courses to be offered in this format.  This fall, PREP 230 will begin on September 28.  To reflect exciting advances in the field of pain, we have changed this course’s title from “Neuroanatomy, Neurophysiology and Neuropharmacology of Pain” to “Neuroscience of Pain: from Society to Synapse”.  Click here to learn more about this course.  As in earlier years it will be directed by Steve Scrivani, who has consistently earned high praise for his meticulous running of this course. Besides his own lectures, over the years Steve has assembled a core group of dedicated, expert faculty to provide students with an unparalleled learning experience.

Click here to access bibliography.

Add comment September 5th, 2012

New Multidisciplinary Pain Program Announced at NIH

By Pamela Katz Ressler, MS, RN, HN-BC, adjunct faculty, Pain Research, Educationand Policy Program, Tufts University School of Medicine

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently announced a new multidisciplinary pain program that will be focused on the role of the brain in perceiving, modifying, and managing pain.  The program, lead by internationally recognized pain researcher and neuroscientist, Catherine Bushnell, PhD,  will be based in the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), a part of the National Institutes of Health.

“Dr. Bushnell’s work has profoundly changed the ways in which we understand and study this very important problem,” said NCCAM Director Josephine P. Briggs, M.D. “Under her leadership, this program will continue to work toward the development of better ways to safely and more effectively treat chronic pain, and advance research on the intersection and integration of pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches.”

The NIH announcement of the pain program comes at a critical time in the growing burden of chronic pain in our society.  The Institute of Medicine reports that more than 100 million people suffer from chronic pain conditions and nearly $635 billion is spent annually for treatment and lost productivity.

Research projects for the new program will include investigating  how chronic pain produces changes in the brain that may modify how the brain reacts to pain medications, such as opioids; as well as exploring factors such as emotion, environment and genetics in pain perception.

The Tufts Pain Research, Education and Policy program faculty and students will look forward to future collaboration with this innovative new program.

Read the July NCCAM Clinical Digest on Chronic Pain and Complementary Health Practices

Add comment July 17th, 2012

The PREP Program at Tufts University School of Medicine is GOING THE DISTANCE

The Pain Research, Education & Policy (PREP) program at Tufts University School of Medicine is GOING THE DISTANCE! 

Since 1999 Tufts has had a unique program that trains leaders in pain research, education and policy. Our graduates have included nurses, physicians, dentists, physical therapists, nurse practitioners, physician’s assistants, pharmacists, researchers, holistic health practitioners, occupational therapists, massage therapists, social workers, hospice workers, health policy advocates, and other health care professionals.

Your input is valuable to us as we plan our move from Boston only-based classroom learning to distance/online  learning — please take this brief, 21 item educational needs  survey. It should take 10 minutes or less to complete.

 TAKE SURVEY NOW

SURVEY EXTENDED TO APRIL 30th TO ALLOW A BROADER RANGE OF OPINIONS TO BE ADDED.  COMPLETE THE SURVEY BY APRIL 30, 2012 TO BE ELIGIBLE FOR THE PRIZES BELOW! 

If you wish to be eligible to win

  • The new (March 2012) iPad (1st prize)
  • 1 OF 2 iPOD SHUFFLES (2nd Prize)
  • 1 OF 25 iTUNEs $10 GIFT CARDS (3rd Prize)

Just leave your name and email address as directed at the end of the survey.

1 comment April 19th, 2012

LIFE Before Death Documentary Screening

by Pamela Katz Ressler, RN, MS-PREP, HN-BC, adjunct faculty Pain Research, Education and Policy Program, Tufts University School of Medicine, PREP-Aired blog moderator

On February 2, 2012, at sites around the world, a remarkable documentary will be premiered.  LIFE Before Death seeks to raise awareness of the global issue of untreated and under-treated pain and the lack of adequate access to palliative care.

Dr. Dan Carr, director and founder of the Pain Research, Education and Policy Program (PREP) within Tufts Public Health recently commented on the selection of the Tufts’ PREP program as one of the U.S. movie screening locations, and global issue of pain relief as a human right.  “PREP is honored to be one of the sites at which this remarkable film will be premiered worldwide. Sponsored by international pain relief and anti-cancer organizations, LIFE Before Death presents a moving, sobering and ultimately inspiring picture of courage amidst suffering. Tragically, much of the suffering at the end of life documented in this film in emerging economies is the unnecessary consequence of the unavailability of morphine and other inexpensive, effective medications. In first-world countries, patients are caught within health systems whose major goal is curbing prescription drug abuse. At a time when access to pain control is seen as a human right, this film appropriately pushes us out of our comfort zone”, stated Dr. Carr.

As emphasized by Dr. Carr, the issue of pain control in emerging global economies is immense.  Global health organizations have estimated that more than 3.3 million individuals die with untreated moderate or severe pain form cancer and HIV each year (2009 WHO and UN Narcotics Control Board).  Advocacy for adequate pain and palliative care is essential, concurred Carol Curtiss, MSN, RN-BC, a palliative care expert and adjunct faculty member of the PREP program.  Ms. Curtiss stated, “Unrelieved pain and other distressing symptoms are challenges to quality of life, yet millions of people worldwide do not have access to  expert care, basic pain medications and the other essential resources. Through viewing this film, LIFE Before Death,  I hope participants will acquire or renew their passion to advocate for changes in policy, education and research that will make access to pain and palliative care a reality for people who experience  life-threatening illnesses. For me, this film reaffirms what I’ve learned over the years by working with colleagues in developing countries and in clinical practice here – we have much more work to do to assure that individuals everywhere have the right to effective  pain management and palliative care throughout their lives. In the U.S., we are facing difficult times dealing with misuse and diversion of medications. We MUST be sure that people with pain have access to evidence-based pain management and palliative care in the U.S. and around the world.”

Join together with clinicians, educators, policy makers, advocates and activists who believe that pain relief is a human right for the Tufts’ PREP screening of LIFE Before Death on Thursday, February 2 from 3:00-5:15 PM at the Wolff Auditorium at Tufts Medical Center.  The Tufts’ screening will be introduced by nationally syndicated health columnist, Judy Foreman and followed by a panel discussion with pain and palliative care experts.

Click here for more information

LIFE Before Death Movie Trailer

Add comment January 30th, 2012

Acupunture and Palliative Care Research Study

by Pamela Katz Ressler, MS-PREP, RN, HN-BC, adjunct faculty Pain Research, Education and Policy Program, Tufts University School of Medicine, PREP-Aired Blog moderator

Jessica Peck, MAc, LAc, MS-PREP candidate presented her capstone research project on December 9, 2011 to a group of students, faculty members and invited guests at the Tufts University School of Medicine. Jessica initiated an ambitious, ongoing study for her capstone project which is being conducted at the Maine Medical Center’s Palliative and Supportive Care Clinic. The focus of her pilot research study is the implementation and evaluation of the feasibility of using acupuncture plus standard care to treat pain and associated symptoms in cancer patients. Jessica will continue to work with her capstone preceptor, Dr. Lauren Michalakes, Director of Palliative Care at Maine Medical Center as her study progresses.

Congratulations, Jessica, for embracing the collaborative nature of the Pain Research, Education and Policy Program by creating a working partnership between eastern and western models of health care.

Jessica Peck and NESA's Amy Hull

1 comment January 6th, 2012

Online Forum for Pain Researchers

by Pamela Katz Ressler, MS-PREP, RN, HN-BC, adjunct faculty Pain Research Education and Policy Program (PREP), Tufts University School of Medicine, and PREP-Aired blog moderator

Social media forums and online communities surrounding health topics are prevalent on the Internet.  The most frequent reason individuals seek medical care is pain; so it is not surprising that there are numerous of active pain-related  online communities.  Most of these communities are focused on pain conditions, treatment, advocacy and support of the individual living with chronic, persistent pain. In contrast to the robust nature of these pain-related online communities for patients and advocates, there has been a paucity of similar online communities for pain researchers and investigators.  The sharing of information and relevant research surrounding the complex nature of persistent pain has historically been relegated to periodic academic conferences and print publications researchers.  However, that may now be changing with the development of the Pain Research Forum.  Launched in June 2011 by  the Harvard NeuroDiscovery Center and Massachusetts General Hospital’s Science Collaboration Foundation,  the Pain Research Forum seeks to speed the translation of scientific knowledge into novel pain therapies by fostering the collaborative nature of an online community and by raising interest in pain research to a wider audience.

We in the Pain Research, Education, and Policy Program (PREP) at Tufts University School of Medicine applaud the collaborative nature of the Pain Research Forum and look forward to participating in this important pain research-based online community.

3 comments November 9th, 2011

Dr. Harris Berman Named Dean of Tufts University School of Medicine

by Pamela Katz Ressler, MS-PREP, RN, HN-BC, adjunct faculty member Pain Research, Education and Policy Program (PREP) Tufts University School of Medicine, PREP-Aired blog moderator and administrator

The Tufts Pain Research, Education and Policy Program congratulates Dr. Harris Berman on his recent appointment to the position of Dean of the Tufts University School of Medicine. Dr. Berman, a visionary leader in providing healthcare to populations, has a keen interest in the intersection of public health and medicine. In a recent interview in Tufts Now, Dr. Berman discussed his belief that public health should be a part of medicine, an integral part of how we care for the health of our population. Dr. Berman’s interest in population health and prevention began as a Peace Corps physician in India and continued into his leadership roles of healthcare organizations and academia.

The Tufts Pain Research Education and Policy Program began in 1999 when Dr. Berman held the position of Chair of Tufts’ Department of Public Health and Family Practice (as it was then known). A fellow visionary regarding pain as a public health concern, he welcomed PREP into that department where it has been happily housed ever since, now under the Dean of Public Health and Professional Degree Programs, Dr. Aviva Must.

As we, in the Pain Research, Education and Policy Program move forward in our efforts to address the immense burden of pain globally, we are pleased to have Dr. Harris Berman at the helm of the Tufts University School of Medicine.

Add comment October 13th, 2011

Next Posts Previous Posts


RSS PREP Fourm Podcasts

Feeds

Tag Cloud

Archives