Institute of Medicine Releases Report on the State of Pain Care in the United States

by Pamela Katz Ressler, MS-PREP, RN, HN-BC, Adjunct Faculty, PREP-Aired blog moderator and administrator, Pain Research Education and Policy Program, Tufts University School of Medicine

On June 29, 2011, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) released a report addressing the issue of pain in the United States and called for “a cultural transformation in the way pain is viewed and treated” (IOM report p. 3).   The 313-page report entitled: Relieving Pain in America: A Blueprint for Transforming Prevention, Care, Education and Research, examines the enormity of the burden of pain from many measures.  Chronic pain affects at least 116 million U.S. adults and the financial cost of pain to society, measured in 2010 dollars, is estimated to range between $560 and $635 billion annually.  In comparing these staggering numbers to other chronic diseases, the cost of pain is greater than the cost of heart disease, cancer and diabetes combined. 

The authors of the IOM report base their recommendations for change and transformation of pain on nine underlying principles:

  • A moral imperitive
  • Chronic pain can be a disease in itself
  • Value of comprehensive treatment
  • Need for interdisciplinary approaches
  • Importance of prevention
  • Wider use of existing knowledge
  • Conundrum of opioids
  • Roles of patients and clinicians
  • Value of a public health and community-based approach

The IOM report highlights the importance of education in the multidisciplinary nature of pain issues and includes it as a key action item in the proposed blueprint for transformation of pain in our society.  On the topic of professional education IOM report recommends:

  • Expansion and redesign of education programs to transform the understanding of pain
  • Improving the curriculum and education for health care professionals around the issue of pain
  • Increasing the number of health professionals with advanced expertise in pain care

We, at the Tufts Pain Research Education and Policy program (PREP), applaud the IOM for increasing awareness of the enormous burden of pain in our society by issuing the report: “Relieving Pain in America: A Blueprint for Transforming Prevention, Care, Education and Research“.   We are also extremely proud that the Tufts PREP program has been providing the type of  comprehensive pain curriculum proposed by the IOM report for over a decade, since 1999, and remains the first and only multidisciplinary postgraduate  program of its kind in the United States.

Your comments and thoughts on the IOM report are welcome;  please click here to read a full, unabridged online version of “Relieving Pain in America: A blueprint for Transforming Prevention, Care, Education and Research”.

Add comment July 5th, 2011

Quality of Life

 

by Pamela Katz Ressler, MS-PREP, RN, HN-BC, PREP-Aired blog moderator and administrator, Program in Pain Research, Education and Policy (PREP) at Tufts University School of Medicine

As we mentioned in our last blog post, The International Association of  the Study of Pain , along with other prominent pain organizations such as The Mayday Fund, the Institute for Palliative Medicine at San Diego Hospice, the Union for International Cancer Control, have joined with the Lien Foundation by co-sponsoring a series of 50 short documentary films spotlighting the global burden of inadequate pain treatment in the project:  LIFE Before Death.

This week’s short film is entitled: Quality of Life and focuses on the dramatic benefits of palliative care services offered to patients and families facing end of life issues.

We welcome your comments on the overall LIFE Before Death project or the specific short films, which we will continually highlight on the Tufts University Pain Research, Education and Policy Program’s PREP-Aired blog throughout the year.

Add comment June 17th, 2011

Life Before Death

by Pamela Katz Ressler, MS-PREP, RN, HN-BC, PREP-Aired blog moderator and administrator, Program in Pain Research, Education and Policy (PREP) at Tufts University School of Medicine

The global burden of pain is immense.  Pain is universal; including all constructs of ethnicity, nationality, culture, race, socioeconomic status, age and gender.  Although pain is ubiquitous, it is woefully under-treated globally.  The International Association of  the Study of Pain , along with other prominent pain organizations such as The Mayday Fund, the Institute for Palliative Medicine at San Diego Hospice, the Union for International Cancer Control, have joined with the Lien Foundation by co-sponsoring a series of 50 short documentary films, released for viewing each week beginning in May 2011, highlighting the international epidemic of the under-treatment of pain.  The project, Life Before Death, will culminate with the release of a feature film in late 2011, followed by a one-hour TV documentary. 

We welcome your comments on the overall Life Before Death project or the specific short films, which we will highlight on the Tufts University Pain Research, Education and Policy Program’s PREP-Aired blog each week.  Let’s start a dialog, that will be heard round the world, affirming the right of all people to have access to effective pain treatment.

Click here to watch the first short film of the Life Before Death project: Conspiracy of Silence

Add comment June 7th, 2011

Health Professionals Making a Difference in Pain Care

by Pamela Katz Ressler, RN, BSN, HN-BC, MS-PREP graduate student and PREP-AIRED blog moderator and administrator, Tufts University School of Medicine

The American Pain Foundation has produced a number of helpful online videos for patients, families and health care professionals highlighting the complex nature of pain, especially chronic pain.  It is essential that pain care be a multidisciplinary process with the patient an active participant in care.  You may want to check out the American Pain Foundation’s selection of online videos on their YouTube site.  Take a look at “Health Professionals Making a Difference in Pain Care” to listen to  health professionals and pain patients share their message.

Add comment March 17th, 2011

PREP Capstone Presentations

by Pamela Katz Ressler, RN, BSN, HN-BC, MS-PREP graduate student and PREP-AIRED blog administrator and moderator

Congratulations to two MS-PREP candidates who recently presented their capstone projects to a group of faculty, alumni and students of the Tufts University School of Medicine’s Pain Research, Education and Policy Programs and the New England School of Acupuncture

Kai-Yin Hsu investigated the clinical use of the MYMOP form and outcome of acupuncture treatment from a U.S. traditional Chinese Medicine teaching clinic.

Pratchi Morajkar conducted a systematic review of Dexmedetomidine and its implications for non-narcotic-based analgosedation in cardiac surgery.

Prachi Morajkar, Dr. Libby Bradshaw, PREP academic director, Kai-Yin Hsu

Both presentations reflect the diverse interests and broad scope of the Tufts University Pain Research, Education and Policy Programs.

Kai-Yin Hsu presenting her PREP capstone project

2 comments January 13th, 2011

A New Year…What Advances in Pain Management Will We See in 2011?

by Pamela Katz Ressler, RN, BSN, HN-BC, MS-PREP graduate student and PREP-AIRED Blog Administrator and Moderator

As we enter a new year, pain is still the #1 reason individuals seek out medical care (American Pain Foundation data).  Those who are involved in research, as well as direct caregivers of patients, know that pain is complex and needs to be addressed by a multi-modal and interdisciplinary approach.  Let’s take stock of where we are and where we hope to go in 2011.  We invite you to comment, discuss and brainstorm ways that we can more effectively manage pain on this site  Let’s envision a day when pain is no longer the #1 reason individuals seek medical care.

Happy New Year…may your year be filled with opportunities and possbilities.

Add comment January 3rd, 2011

New Release: Approaches to Pain Management with foreward by Daniel Carr, MD, FABPM

by Pamela Katz Ressler, RN, BSN, HN-BC, MS-PREP graduate student and PREP-AIRED blog moderator

Untreated or under-treated pain causes needless suffering and negatively affects the quality of life. That is why the management of pain remains a critical area of health care and why the concept is addressed throughout the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) requirements. 

We congratulate the Tufts University School of Medicine’s Pain Research, Education and Policy Programs co-founder, Daniel Carr, MD, FABPM for providing the forward to the newly published second edition of Approaches to Pain Management: An Essential Guide for Clinical Leaders  

Approaches to Pain Management: An Essential Guide for Clinical Leaders, published by the Joint Commission Resources, provides an overview of pain assessment and management, identifies what the standards require regarding the treatment of patients with pain, and offers guidance on making pain management an integral part of care services.   Dr. Carr, an internationally recognized expert in pain management, provides both perspective and vision on the complex nature of pain.

The majority of the book is devoted to the best practices of health care institutions that have adopted focused pain programs. This updated guide also incorporates a global view of pain management, additional organizational best practices—including some from non-U.S. institutions.  Other features include the following:

  • Summaries of every Joint Commission and Joint Commission International pain assessment and management requirement across all health care settings
  • Strategies for identifying and using evidence-based medicine resources for pain management
  • Expanded case study chapters from clinical leaders describing how their organizations developed and implemented their pain management activities
  • Techniques and ideas for understanding and meeting pain-related standards
  • Guidance on committing an organization to pain management improvements

For more information about  the newly released edition of Approaches to Pain Management: An Essential Guide for Clinical Leaders, click here 

 

Add comment November 29th, 2010

MS-PREP August 2010 Capstone Presentations

by Pamela Katz Ressler, RN, BSN, HN-BC, MS-PREP student and PREP-AIRED blog moderator

 

August 11, 2010 marked the culmination of intensive research and planning for two candidates for Master’s degrees in the Pain Research, Education and Policy Program at the Tufts University School of Medicine with the presentation of their capstone projects.

Margaretta Elizabeth (Beth) Sangree, a student in the joint program with the New England School of Acupuncture (NESA), presented her capstone project entitled

PREP%20August%202010.jpg

Pictured L-R: Ylisabyth (Libby) Bradshaw, DO, MS, Associate Director of the Pain Research, Education and Policy Program; Margaretta Elizabeth (Beth) Sangree, MS-PREP candidate, Richard Glickman-Simon, MD, Director of the Pain Research, Education and Policy Program; and Sherry Brink, RN, BSN, MS-PREP candidate

“Measures of the Patient-Provider Relationship in Acupuncture Treatments”. Beth highlighted several studies that support the importance of relationship-centered care in effective pain treatment. Future directions will include quanitfiable, replicable, randominzed control studies to continue to document the effect of patient-provider relationship on treatment effectiveness.

Sherry Brink, RN, BSN, presented her capstone project on “Post-Op Pain Management in the Pediatric Patient” with emphasis on bringing best practices of post-op pain managment to underserved, international patient populations. Sherry recounted her experience bringing comprehensive pain management methods to a small rural hospital in the Andes mountains of Peru and her development and integration of a bilingual nursing education module on pain management currently being used by the staff in Peru. Sherry hopes to use her MS-PREP degree to further her international medical mission work by continuing to educate nurses worldwide in effective, compassionate pain management methods.

Congratulations to these two exceptional MS-PREP degree candidates!

Add comment August 23rd, 2010

Military Leads the Way in Acupuncture for PTSD

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by Pamela Katz Ressler, RN, BSN, HN-BC, MS-PREP graduate student and PREP-AIRED blog moderator
With an estimated 17 percent of U.S. miliary personnel returning from Iraq and Afghanistan with symptoms of PTSD or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (Archives of General Psychiatry), the military is now leading the way in integration of western and eastern models of care into the healthcare system. Use of acupuncture, meditation, yoga, and tai chi are currently being utilized in conjuntion with allopathic medical and psychological care. A recent article in Statesman.com highlights these integrative efforts.
Click here to read the article.

1 comment June 24th, 2010

Acupuncture and Tension Headaches

By Pamela Katz Ressler, RN, BSN, HN-BC, MS-PREP student and PREP-AIRED blog moderator
Thank you to 2010 MS-PREP alumna, Nancy Mitchell, for sending along a recent update to the Cochrane Library and the Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews addressing acupuncture and tension-type headaches. In a previous Cochrane Review (2001), acupuncture was found to be inconclusive as a treatment for tension-type headaches. However an updated 2009 Cochrane Review on acupuncture and tension-type headaches, which included 11 randomly controlled trials, concluded that acupuncture may be a valuable treatment option for patients suffering from frequent tension-type headaches.
The Cochrane Review stated: “We reviewed 11 trials which investigated whether acupuncture is effective in the prophylaxis of tension-type headache. Two large trials investigating whether adding acupuncture to basic care (which usually involves only treating unbearable pain with pain killers) found that those patients who received acupuncture had fewer headaches. Forty-seven percent of patients receiving acupuncture reported a decrease in the number of headache days by at least 50%, compared to 16% of patients in the control groups. Six trials compared true acupuncture with inadequate or ‘fake’ acupuncture interventions in which needles were either inserted at incorrect points or did not penetrate the skin. Overall, these trials found slightly better effects in the patients receiving the true acupuncture intervention. Fifty percent of patients receiving true acupuncture reported a decrease of the number of headache days by at least 50%, compared to 41% of patients in the groups receiving inadequate or ‘fake’ acupuncture. Three of the four trials in which acupuncture was compared to physiotherapy, massage or relaxation had important methodological shortcomings. Their findings are difficult to interpret, but collectively suggest slightly better results for some outcomes with the latter therapies. In conclusion, the available evidence suggests that acupuncture could be a valuable option for patients suffering from frequent tension-type headache.”
Cochrane Reviews are an integral part of evidence based medicine. It is important to include both allopathic and integrative medicine studies in the rigorous review process to further our knowledge of effective strategies to treat and manage chronic pain conditions.

Add comment May 23rd, 2010

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