Innovation

Subcutaneous Ureteral Bypass Device

As veterinarians gain experience in the discipline of interventional endourology we find that there are challenges in some of our patients that are not experienced in human endourology. One of these challenges is the feline ureter.  In the healthy state it is a very thin and narrow structure averaging  about  0.4mm in diameter. Ureteral stents for felines are avialbale as small as 2 and 2.5 Fr and for dogs as large as 6 Fr. The obstructed ureter may distend to perhaps a centimeter at its widest point, but usually it is less than that and is often tortuous in nature.  Additionally the cause for ureteral obstructions is often calcium oxalate uroliths which may become embedded in the wall of the ureter making removal impossible, and also making passage of a stent around the stone quite challenging.  Another cause of ureteral obstruction is a stricture at a previous site of urolith lodgment or urolith removal. Continue reading

Innovation

At the Tufts Obesity Clinic for Animals, part of our mission is to investigate why weight management is so challenging and how we can make weight loss safer for pets  and easier for owners and veterinarians. Drs. Linder and Freeman have surveyed pet diets marketed for weight loss and published the results in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. They found that  ‘light’ diets varied tremendously in calorie density, feeding directions, and price (for example, dry canine diets ranged from 217-440 kcal/cup). These results support the notion that having owners simply ‘switch to a light food is unlikely to be successful’ and depending on the current diet, might even lead pets to gain weight.

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Innovation

Insulinoma, a small and malignant neuroendocrine tumor of dogs, has proven difficult to detect reliably with imaging tests. The literature suggests that ultrasound detects a primary pancreatic lesion in approximately 50% of cases and detects metastases in only 20% of cases.  CT has a reported success rate of detecting a primary lesion in 70% of cases, but is of limited value in the detection of metastases. Continue reading

Innovation

Recently, the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) and the World Small Animal Hospital Association (WSAVA) Nutritional Guidelines were published. These guidelines were developed by committees that included Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine nutritionist, Dr. Lisa Freeman, as well as other nutritionists, veterinary practitioners, and scientists from multiple countries. Continue reading