Prospective evaluation of 3D-conformal palliative radiation therapy plus toceranib for the treatment of measurable carcinomas in the dog

Carcinomas are a common form of malignancy in both dogs and humans. As a category of cancer, carcinomas tend to be both locally invasive as well as carry a high risk of locoregional metastasis. In cases diagnosed in early stages, long term survival is often possible with a combination of surgery, definitive radiation therapy, and conventional chemotherapy, but such multimodality therapy is often cost prohibitive for many clients. Furthermore, surgery may not be an option for some patients. Therapy is often limited to palliative radiation therapy (PRT) +/- conventional chemotherapy. The purpose of this study is to evaluate therapy with toceranib (Palladia®), an oral anticancer agent, in combination with palliative radiation therapy for tolerability, toxicity, and efficacy in a population of dogs with measurable carcinomas.

For more information regarding this study please visit: http://sites.tufts.edu/vetclinicaltrials/

Study of Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA) in Pembroke Welsh Corgis

Congenital heart defects occur in a variety of dog breeds, with the most common being the patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Although this is a correctable disorder in most puppies, it requires surgery or a catheter-based procedure which can be expensive and is not without risk. Therefore, determining the genetic cause of PDA in dogs would be highly desirable so that dogs could be screened and the genetic mutation could be eventually bred out of the canine population. Corgis are a breed at increased risk for PDAs so the goal of this study is to evaluate Corgis with and without PDAs in order to identify the gene mutation for this heart problem.

For more information regarding this study please visit: http://sites.tufts.edu/vetclinicaltrials/

Evaluating hypercoagulability (abnormal blood coagulation that increases the risk of blood clots) in dogs with brachycephalic airway syndrome: similarity to human obstructive sleep apnea.

The primary purpose of the study is to determine whether English Bulldogs are more hypercoagulable, (an abnormality of the clotting process that increases the risk of developing blood clots within blood vessels) than non-brachycephalic dogs by running a series of coagulation tests. We are also interested in determining if C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation and cardiovascular risk, is elevated in English Bulldogs as it is in humans with obstructive sleep apnea.

For more information regarding this study please visit: http://sites.tufts.edu/vetclinicaltrials/