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Brush Up on the Importance of Oral Health

  Halloween is around the corner, and it can be hard to say no to the abundance of candy corn and pumpkin sweets that are taking over the shelves. If you have decided to relax on your diet a little, make sure that you are at least taking precautions against cavities! While you’re at it, take a few minutes to learn about the importance of maintaining oral hygiene and health. Oral health is not always a main focus in public health, but there are plenty of reasons why public health officials should pay attention to this field. Oral bacteria and inflammation from periodontitis (severe form of gum disease) have been shown to cause health problems in other parts of the body. Bacteria from the mouth can spread through the bloodstream and attach to … Read entire article »

Filed under: Dental Health, Halloween, Oral Health

The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge: The Impact of Social Media on Health Communication

Facebook timelines were drenched in ice bucket videos this summer, as millions of people around the globe doused themselves in ice water. As the amount of videos increased, ALS became synonymous with the Ice Bucket Challenge. Also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease, ALS (Amyotrphic lateral sclerosis) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. The disease causes motor neurons to die, eventually making it impossible for the brain to initiate and control muscle movement. At the beginning, patients may experience muscle weakness and difficulties with speech, swallowing, or breathing. In the later stages of the disease, patients may become completely paralyzed. The idea of challenging people to either douse themselves in cold water or donate to a charity has been popular in the sports arena … Read entire article »

Filed under: ALS, Awareness, Fundraising, Ice Bucket Challenge

Strength, Resilience, and Pride: The Medical Community Remembers the Boston Marathon 2013

I was home in Chicago when I heard the news. My mom had just picked me up after a long day of work, and I was dialing the Tufts phone number to inquire about on-campus housing.  As I was about to press “call,” my mom asked me, “Did you hear about the explosions at the Boston Marathon?” Quickly, I closed my phone. Having attended Emerson College for undergraduate school, located just a few blocks away from the Marathon finish line on Boylston Street, Boston was my second home. When she told me about the explosions, we did not yet know if they were terrorist attacks. The week continued and as the events unfolded, I prayed for the swift recovery of this incredibly strong city. One year later, as a Tufts … Read entire article »

Filed under: Awareness, Boston Marathon, Boston Strong, Emergencies, Emergency Preparedness, Medical Community, Uncategorized

Walking for a Cause: A Public Health Event

Each year, millions of people walk for hundreds of causes from cancer to infertility, from hunger to education. I have walked for several different causes, but most of them have been for epilepsy. I was diagnosed with epilepsy when I was thirteen, and the cause is near and dear to my heart. When I attended the National Walk for Epilepsy in Washington DC this year, however, it was no longer just about me or my epilepsy. It was my first year attending as a public health student, and it was the first time I realized why walks for causes are more than just fundraising events. They are a way of improving public health, especially for conditions that are difficult to manage or are highly stigmatized. My experiences have taught me … Read entire article »

Filed under: Awareness, Education

Biased Sex Education in the United States

After significant outbreaks of sexually transmitted diseases among soldiers in World War I, the federal government became involved and allocated money to educate soldiers about gonorrhea, syphilis and chlamydia. In 1919, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Children’s Bureau suggested that soldiers would have benefited from learning about STDs (sexually transmitted diseases) during school. As a result in the 1920s, sex education began to be taught in public schools. Throughout the past century, sex education has become a hotly debated topic amongst legislators, public health officials, and state education boards. It is still a controversial subject, with people debating whether or not sex education mandates are constitutional, if sex education is appropriate for students, and what information should or should not be taught. Each state has its own policies about sex education in … Read entire article »

Filed under: Sex Education

Cervical Cancer Awareness Month: How Women Can Decrease their Risk of Developing Cervical Cancer

In the U.S., 11,000 new cases of cervical cancer are diagnosed every year and approximately 4,000 women pass away from the disease. Like any form of cancer, cervical cancer can greatly decrease quality of life and can ultimately result in death. Fortunately, these outcomes can often be avoided, as cervical cancer is one of the most preventable types of cancer. One of the key tenets of the practice of public health is informing people about various health issues and what they can do to avoid contracting illness. Therefore, given that January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month, below is information on some of the ways women can decrease their risk of developing cervical cancer. Screening & Detection Methods of screening and early detection have improved, contributing to a 74% decrease in the mortality rate … Read entire article »

Filed under: Uncategorized

At the End of the Storm: Public Health Concerns in the Aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan

  It has been over a month since Typhoon Haiyan (known as Typhoon Yolanda in the Philippines) tore through the Philippines, destroying cities and devastating communities. The most recent counts put the death toll at 5,924, with another 1,779 people missing and over 4 million people displaced. Along with damage and heart break, Typhoon Haiyan has inflicted numerous public health concerns. Poor Sanitation and Increased Water Contamination Sanitation and water contamination are often concerns after natural disasters, because they can lead to waterborne diseases. Those stationed in Tacloban, the capital of the Philippines, have reported that even the city’s most reliable pumps have become contaminated. As a result, there have been cases of dysentery, a potentially fatal intestinal disease.. Compromised Maternal Health Maternal health care in the Philippines has seen improvements over the past few … Read entire article »

Filed under: Uncategorized

Giving Thanks and Staying Healthy

Giving Thanks and Staying Healthy

Thanksgiving is around the corner and you can almost smell the pumpkin pie cooking already. It’s that time of year when people come together for a festive meal, relax around the fireplace, and then wait out in the cold to beat the Black Friday rush. In the midst of the holiday bustle, it can be easy to forget about health and wellness. The Tufts Public Health & Professional Degree Programs’ have put together a list … Read entire article »

Filed under: Uncategorized

Tufts PHPD Explores Bullying Interventions for National Bullying Prevention Month

Tufts PHPD Explores Bullying Interventions for National Bullying Prevention Month

October is here, and in the realm of Public Health it is easy to forget about autumn foliage and pumpkin spice lattes. Instead, we busy ourselves with flu shots and preparing for the cold weather. However, October does not only mark the beginning of flu season. It also is National Bullying Prevention Month. Bullying has garnered attention as a national concern. Nationwide surveys and studies have revealed that one in three youths experience bullying on a … Read entire article »

Filed under: Bullying, Prevention