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Digital Health Trends: Need a second opinion? There’s an app for that.

Digital Health Trends: Need a second opinion? There’s an app for that.

In this digital age, we are constantly on our phones. In the last week, how many of us have used an app on our smartphone to track or monitor our health- probably the majority of us. But are these health apps reliable? It seems there is an app for almost every health behavior out there, including losing weight, managing diabetes, monitoring sleep quality, improving medication adherence, and even measuring your blood pressure. With over 165,000 health-related … Read entire article »

Filed under: Mobile Health

National Public Health Week: April 4-10, 2016

National Public Health Week: April 4-10, 2016

April means spring weather, budding trees, flowers in bloom, and…National Public Health Week (NPHW)! Sponsored by the American Public Health Association (APHA) since 1995, the first full week in April each year has been dedicated to promoting events focused on public health, with the ultimate goal of creating a healthier nation. This year, NPHW is April 4th through 10th. The Public Health and Professional Degree (PHPD) Programs Student Senate organized the activities that will be held … Read entire article »

Filed under: Awareness, Public Health Week

From A to Zika

From A to Zika

Amidst a battle with the Zika virus, we observe February as International Prenatal Infection Prevention Month. Pregnant women or women planning to become pregnant are being warned about the possible link to microcephaly in infants born to women who have contracted the Zika virus. The Zika outbreak has been classified as a global public health emergency at a “level 1” status by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Level 1, the highest, has only … Read entire article »

Filed under: Emergency Preparedness, Prenatal Health, Zika Virus

Have you had the conversation? Let’s talk.

Have you had the conversation? Let’s talk.

Discussions around end-of-life care are often seen as morbid and taboo in our culture and are therefore silenced. Although 90% of people say that talking with their loved ones about end-of-life care is important, only 27% have done so.* According to Ellen Goodman, co-founder and director of The Conversation Project, we don’t have these conversations because it seems too soon; however, as she says, “it’s always too soon…until it’s too late.” Goodman presented in 2014 … Read entire article »

Filed under: end of life

Tips for New Year’s Resolutions that Won’t Dissolve by Spring

Tips for New Year’s Resolutions that Won’t Dissolve by Spring

The new year is around the corner, and you may be thinking of resolutions and promises of self-improvement to begin on January 1st. In 2015, the top five resolutions were to lose weight, get organized, spend less and save more, enjoy life to the fullest, and stay fit and healthy. Many of us made similar resolutions last January, but were unsuccessful in reaching our goal or maintaining our improved behavior. If this sounds like you, … Read entire article »

Filed under: New Year's Resolutions

WHO is Raising Critical Consciousness of Consumers of Red Meat and Processed Meat

WHO is Raising Critical Consciousness of Consumers of Red Meat and Processed Meat

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), the cancer agency of the World Health Organization (WHO), recently reported findings that the consumption of red meat and processed meats raises the risk of cancer. Processed meats include hot dogs, sausage, ham, bacon, or any meat that has been transformed through salting, curing, fermentation or smoking. Red meats include beef, veal, pork, lamb, horse, mutton, and goat. The IARC reviewed over 800 studies of consumption of … Read entire article »

Filed under: Awareness, Cancer

The Truth Will Set You Free: Tufts’ Film Screening of The Fix

The Truth Will Set You Free: Tufts’ Film Screening of The Fix

“A tale of recovery and redemption that paints a portrait of life after heroin addiction in the Bronx”-The Fix On Thursday, October 22nd, Tufts University School of Medicine held a screening of the documentary film The Fix followed by a panel discussion. Panelists included Dr. Alysse Wurcel, a Tufts Medical Center Physician, and Virginia Lijewski, an infectious disease epidemiologist at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. The panel was moderated by Haner Hernandez, currently in long-term recovery, … Read entire article »

Filed under: Hepatitis C, Opioid Epidemic

Know your nose: seasonal allergies are in the air

Know your nose: seasonal allergies are in the air

As another summer ends and back to school season begins, many of us are beginning to notice emerging symptoms of sneezing, watery eyes, runny nose, scratchy throats, and congestion. The first day of fall is tomorrow, September 23rd, and with the warm daytime temperatures and cool night climate, ragweed and tree pollen are thriving at the expense of our immune systems. Allergies in the fall? Allergies are a growing public health issue affecting millions of Americans, and … Read entire article »

Filed under: Allergies, Prevention, Winter Health

Sleep Awareness Month

Daylight Savings Time has come and gone, and so has an hour of sleep. It might not take very long to adjust to losing an hour of sleep, but some people lose hours every night. March is Sleep Awareness Month, and the Tufts Office of Public Health & Professional Degree Programs is reminding the Tufts community that sleep is in integral part of maintaining health. While there are many different sleep disorders, one of the most common is obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). OSA occurs when breathing is briefly and repeatedly interrupted during sleep. Breathing pauses, or “apneas”, last for at least ten seconds when muscles in the back of the throat fail to keep the airway open. These pauses can cause night after night of fragmented, interrupted sleep. What causes OSA? There are several … Read entire article »

Filed under: Sleep

Staying Healthy in a Winter Wonderland

Winter Storm Juno has swept the East Coast, and the Tufts Health Sciences Campus has been buried in snow. Many students rejoiced at the news of two consecutive snow days, taking advantage of the time to relax, get ahead on work, and catch up on Netflix. The blizzard has passed, but the forecast predicts temperatures as low as 0° degrees over the next week, as well as the possibility of more precipitation. With snow, ice, and freezing temperatures, below are several recommendations for staying safe throughout the rest of the winter. Frostbite Now that the winds are dying down, it is more tempting than ever to go outside and indulge in that nostalgic desire to build a snowman or go sledding. These activities often require being outside for long periods of time, … Read entire article »

Filed under: Blizzards, Emergencies, Emergency Preparedness, Winter Health