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Tufts Public Health » Reproductive Health

The CDC’s Banned Words and The Effects on Public Health

On December 15, 2017, The Washington Post reported that policy analysts and officials of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had been informed of a new list of words that were prohibited from being used in their 2019 Presidential budget documents. The seven-word list consisted of vulnerable, entitlement, diversity, transgender, fetus, evidence-based, and science-based. The origin of the ban is unknown, but it’s believed to have come from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) who composes the CDC’s annual budget. In certain cases, CDC budget analysts were given suggested rewordings such as replacing “evidence-based” with “CDC bases its recommendations on science in consideration with community standards and wishes.” This ban comes at a time of massive budget cuts under the Trump administration. The CDC’s 2018 budget proposal … Read entire article »

Filed under: Disparities, Prenatal Health, Prevention, Reproductive Health, Uncategorized, Zika Virus

The importance of access to reproductive health care

“We need to ensure that the next generation is as healthy as possible,” says Odilia Bermudez, PhD, MPH, Associate Professor of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine and Associate Professor of Nutrition, Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. “And that their children and their grandchildren are also coming into this world healthy and happy.” Public health professionals have an important role to play in education and policy work surrounding reproductive health, including contraception, fertility, pregnancy, and birth. Nearly half of pregnancies in the U.S. are unplanned, with higher rates among ethnic minority groups and low-income populations. Unintended pregnancies are associated with low birth weight, later initiation of prenatal medical care, and other health concerns for women and fetuses. In addition, they correlate with lower income … Read entire article »

Filed under: Prenatal Health, Prevention, Reproductive Health, Sex Education