Posts by: Alex DeWaal

This is not just a difference in wealth. It points to very different ways in which governance is organized in different parts of Sudan. The difference between the ordered landscape of the Gezira and the organic landscape of the savanna is more-or-less coterminous with the colonial distinction between the riverain regions that received investment, and the “closed districts” that served as labor reserves and areas in which the “native administration” system of tribal chiefs was imposed.

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Khartoum’s urban infrastructure shows the impact of the boom-and-bust cycle. Below is a street photograph from central Khartoum. Note the unfinished buildings: they have been that way since the late 1970s. What happened was that the Nimeiri government borrowed recklessly, causing a boom, that came to an abrupt halt in 1978. Many half-finished buildings from [...]

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View an image of the IGAD negotiated agreement to resolve the crisis in South Sudan

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In this series of ten posts, I will use graphs, figures and pictures to get a sense of the Sudanese predicament today. The focus is on peace, and especially the economic and financial logic of peace.

The following figure shows government budgets (current expenditure) between 1970 and 2011, and peace agreements (green) and changes in [...]

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The geographical inequality of income and investment in Sudan is striking. The figure below was drawn by me in the 1980s, based on an analysis of how the Sudanese economy had been restructured in the late 1970s and ‘80s, following the migration of most Sudanese professionals to the Gulf countries, and their remittances sent home, [...]

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Enough Foolishness

On May 2, 2014 By

Earlier this week, the Enough Project and Humanity United wrote to leading members of the U.S. Administration with recommendations for how the U.S. should respond to the current crises in South Sudan and Sudan. They began their substantive recommendations with perhaps a little more candor than they intended: “the U.S. must invest much more [...]

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