Posts by: Bridget Conley

Let’s return to the immediate aftermath of the deployment of chemical weapons on rebel-held areas of Syria attack on August 21, 2013.

Given the Obama administration’s previously stated “red line” that a chemical weapons attack represented, speculation began almost immediately that the U.S. would increase it military engagement in the conflict, likely by bombing [...]

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“But how has Congress managed to avoid tackling one of the biggest looming issues in U.S. foreign policy? Well, in June the administration publicly announced a new policy of providing weapons and other military support to the Syrian rebels but paradoxically designated it a CIA “covert action” that cannot be discussed by the public and may go forward without a congressional vote.”

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On Bombing Syria

On August 28, 2013 By

Bombing the government of Syria, targeting selected sites related to the command and implementation of the chemical attack against civilians in Moadamiya is a seductive idea.

Chemical weapons have been banned under international law since 1925. They are uniquely shocking to the conscience. Campaigners against weapons such as anti-personnel landmines hold up the repudiation of [...]

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Our colleagues in The Fletcher School Admissions Office invited us to introduce our work to the audience on their blog. Our response comes in three essays, the first of which provides some background on the organization and was published this week. Below is an excerpt and you can find the entire essay here. The [...]

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While in Siena, Italy for the 2013 International Association of Genocide Scholars conference, Alex de Waal and I discovered a unique way of honoring a historic peacemaker, Santa Caterina. She was born on 25 March 1347 in Siena, the 24th child of Jacopo of Benincasa and Lapa of Puccio of the Piagenti, [...]

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With Alex de Waal

In our summer series exploring the diversity of ways that individuals and organizations work for world peace, we also find ourselves engaged by the question of how the world treats its peacemakers.

Of course, the most famous of prizes for peace is the Nobel Peace Prize, which [...]

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