Posts by: Bridget Conley

Our colleagues in The Fletcher School Admissions Office invited us to introduce our work to the audience on their blog. Our response comes in three essays, the first of which provides some background on the organization and was published this week. Below is an excerpt and you can find the entire essay here. The [...]

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While in Siena, Italy for the 2013 International Association of Genocide Scholars conference, Alex de Waal and I discovered a unique way of honoring a historic peacemaker, Santa Caterina. She was born on 25 March 1347 in Siena, the 24th child of Jacopo of Benincasa and Lapa of Puccio of the Piagenti, [...]

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With Alex de Waal

In our summer series exploring the diversity of ways that individuals and organizations work for world peace, we also find ourselves engaged by the question of how the world treats its peacemakers.

Of course, the most famous of prizes for peace is the Nobel Peace Prize, which [...]

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Rather than debate the U.S. record, seminar discussions were focused on Iraqis’ experiences of mass violence, from diverse perspectives—historical, sociological, political, demographic and statistical, environmental. Iraqi scholars and specialists framed an agenda for studying patterns of violence around Iraq’s history and politics, including domestic governance and societal relations, and relations with neighboring states and international powers.

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The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) is in danger of negating one of the basic reasons for its existence. Its recent decisions to acquit senior Serbian architects of ethnic cleansing in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Croatia imply that the Tribunal does not, after all, rise above the traditional impunity enjoyed by state actors [...]

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The coincidence of two news items about Burma/Myanmar today demand brief commentary: 1) International Crisis Group is honoring President U Thein Sein at its annual dinner, and 2) Human Rights Watch released a damning report about assaults against Burma’s Rohingya minority.

The most common way that atrocities against civilians end is when the perpetrators themselves [...]

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