WPF’s Sam Perlo-Freeman has a new article, “SIPRI’s New Long Data-set on Military Expenditure: The Successes and Methodological Pitfalls,” published in Defence and Peace Economics, describing some of the work he undertook as part of SIPRI’s research team. Below is the abstract.

“SIPRI has collected data on military expenditure almost since its foundation in the […]

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In its 106 years of existence, the World Peace Foundation has committed to understanding and promoting peaceful relations among and within nations, as well as analyzing the causes of war. Today, based on our expertise and given the statements and actions of the current President of the United States, we are obliged to take a step without precedent, which is to name U.S. President Donald Trump as a major threat to global peace.

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We have just launched a compendium of 40 case studies of mass atrocity endings.

The case studies (look here for an alpha listing of cases) include all cases post-1945, that demonstrate strong evidence of the killing of at least 50,000 civilians or persons rendered hors de combat. The studies focus on the direct killing, expanded to include those who died […]

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On Saturday, January 21, historic Women’s Marches took place across America and across the world, touching every continent with messages of peace, hope, and dissent. This was the largest protest in U.S. history that brought supporters from a myriad of social justice issues together in common cause. Or did it?

Conflicting […]

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The current crisis in The Gambia has a simple story. On 1 December 2016 presidential elections were held in the country with the incumbent Yahya Jammeh and the opposition leader Mr Adama Barrow as frontrunners. The following day, the Independent Electoral Commission of the Gambia announced a surprising result, Jammeh lost the election by 39.6 […]

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In this posting, we present a voice from the African American community, from a slightly later period, but which we think speaks strongly to today. Langston Hughes (1902 – 1967) was an American author of poetry, plays, novels, short stories and essay—one of the brilliant writers to emerge as part of the Harlem Renaissance. In 1936, he published “Let America Be America Again,” a poem that articulates a vision of a country that excluded his own community of African-Americans among others–the Native population and the poor–and that transforms an illusion of past greatness into a call to action to forge the country we would yet want to see.

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