Statement on Ending Famine, endorsed by members of the Tufts University community: Famine is an age-old scourge that almost disappeared in our lifetime. On the basis of our relevant scholarly and professional expertise, we, members of the faculty, staff and students of Tufts University, make the following declaration about the grave public ill that is famine, and our responsibility, as a university, a nation, and members of the international community, to end famine once and for all.

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In this video, [ 2.30 mins.] Vijay Prashad, journalist, historian and director of Tricontinental Institute for Social Research, discusses the flow of weapons from ‘friends’ to ‘enemies’ across today’s war zones. [Produced by World Peace Foundation with Corruption Watch, original footage produced for Shadow World]

Learn more about WPF’s project on corruption and the global arms trade, […]

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The Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) released its latest data on the international arms trade on Monday 12th March. The data show a continuing growth in the global trade in major conventional weapons, with the volume of transfers from 2013-2017 being 10% higher than it was over 2008-2012.

SIPRI arms trade data […]

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Indisputably, these developments constitute a crucial aspect of Riyadh’s broader national reform agenda, as led by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. Within the wider regional context of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC), they mark the long overdue acceleration of a trend towards improving citizen women’s participation in the economy and public life. Yet, improvement in the lives of half of the region’s citizens cannot be understood if we ignore the demographic reality that roughly 49 percent of GCC residents are foreign nationals, at least a third of whom are noncitizen women.[1] An important question is whether state policies aimed ostensibly at women’s empowerment represent an exercise in national inclusion or nationalist retreat? The answer is, “Both.”

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Ethiopia’s Prime Minister Hailemariam Dessalegn resigned on February 15. He is “employee of the month” for March not for what he did, but what he failed to do. In the five and a half years in which he presided over Ethiopia, he allowed the country to drift towards turmoil. Ethiopia today is at grave risk of internal conflict and is unable to play its essential role as a bastion of stability and peacemaking in the Horn of Africa.

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Interviewed published on the Newshour’s website on March 3, 2018. South Sudan and Yemen are at the brink of a severe food crisis, with over 400,000 malnourished children in Yemen, the United Nations estimates. Alex de Waal, a professor at the Tufts Fletcher School who spent years in the Horn of Africa, talks to […]

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