Currently viewing the tag: "arms trade"

NB: this topic is discussed at greater length, with more details on the methodology used to obtain an estimate, in an occasional paper now available on the WPF website.

The question sounds straightforward, but the answer is anything but. Available data on the financial value of the international arms trade is extremely poor, such […]

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On Monday, July 10, the UK High Court ruled that the government is acting lawfully in allowing export licenses for arms sales to Saudi Arabia. In so doing, the Court rejected a judicial review brought by Campaign Against Arms Trade (CAAT), which argued that such sales were illegal due to the Saudi-led war […]

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On March 8, 2017, Reiner Braun spoke to a group at Tufts University. In a world where global military expenditures top 1.8 trillion dollars, Reiner Braun urged his audience to find common points of understanding to avoid conflict. Braun cited the expansion of NATO alongside European national armies, and the increasing connections between these military […]

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Six reasons why the global arms makers love Pres. Trump:

1) His eagerness to increase Pentagon spending by $54 billion, especially given his disinterest in articulating how the spending relates to threats or what the new funds should enable. It is worth noting that the U.S. already spends more on defense than the […]

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The global arms trade is suffused with corruption, imperils the vulnerable, and makes us all less safe. Yet arms merchants and their government supporters can turn to a set of time-honed and well-packaged arguments to justify the status quo. Through examining the myths that sustain the arms industry, a panel convened by the World Peace […]

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WPF’s Sam Perlo-Freeman has a new article, “SIPRI’s New Long Data-set on Military Expenditure: The Successes and Methodological Pitfalls,” published in Defence and Peace Economics, describing some of the work he undertook as part of SIPRI’s research team. Below is the abstract.

“SIPRI has collected data on military expenditure almost since its foundation in the […]

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