Currently viewing the tag: "atrocities"

In the coming weeks, Reinventing Peace will feature a number of reflections on patterns of violence in Somalia that stemmed from our recent seminar on the topic. We kick off this series of memos with the feature below by Lidwien Kapteijns.

History of the Project: Stage One
This project started as research into Somali [...]

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On September 26, 2013, the World Peace Foundation hosted a book signing and discussion of Lidwien Kapteijns’ new book, Clan Cleansing in Somalia: The Ruinous Turn of 1991. Kapteijns, a Somalia scholar–an expert on Somali literature–and professor of History at Wellesley College, presented her work as part of the World Peace Foundation’s “Patterns [...]

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Published in the Yorkshire Post, September 12, 2013

I HAVE a visceral memory of the cell-phone photo of a man with his eye-lids pulled off by the Syrian secret police.

This photo was shown to me in the Za’atari refugee camp by a coffee shop owner from Dara, who had fled to the [...]

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Syria: Law and Diplomacy

On September 8, 2013 By

Our Oped in the New York Times last week on Syria raised many questions. In this blog I will continue to address those issues, that could not properly be elaborated in the original piece because of the need for brevity. There are also some issues that have arisen since.

 

First, the issue of [...]

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Let’s return to the immediate aftermath of the deployment of chemical weapons on rebel-held areas of Syria attack on August 21, 2013.

Given the Obama administration’s previously stated “red line” that a chemical weapons attack represented, speculation began almost immediately that the U.S. would increase it military engagement in the conflict, likely by bombing [...]

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Punishment, protection and peace must be joined. None can be achieved in isolation. All require a strong international coalition. Syria needs a political process, and that demands that belligerents and all regional actors meet to set the terms of a solution. Force might still be required at that point, but it would at least serve a political process instead of standing in for it.

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