Currently viewing the tag: "Libya"

by Casey Hogle and Soumia Aitelhaj

A little over a year after the death of the former leader of Libya, Muammar Gaddafi, the World Peace Foundation hosted a panel to illuminate the current state of affairs in Libya. Hugh Roberts, Edward Keller Professor of Middle East history at Tufts and the former [...]

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Powerful nations still face the temptation of interpreting international law and norms in such a way that it suits their interests, and setting them aside when they don’t. I will argue that this is not only bad for international law and international security, but it is a particularly bad practice in Africa, because of the particularities of African history and contemporary African conflicts. These particularities include both the specific local details of African conflicts, which are best addressed by those in the neighbourhood who understand them best, and also the historically-grounded African distrust of outside interventions, which militates against the success of non-African initiatives.

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In short, it remains to be seen to what extent the intentions and interests of the coup leaders represent or overlap with those of civil society. But let us not be fooled by the myth of “Mali as a flourishing democracy,” nor unduly over-dichotomize the proponents of democracy versus the forces of military autocracy. Did not democracy emerge through a military coup?

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The dominant interventionist approach to peace and security in Africa by-passes the hard work of creating domestic political consensus and instead imposes models of government favoured by western powers. The emergent African methodology offers a chance to develop locally-rooted solutions too often sidelined.

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