Currently viewing the tag: "memorialization"

Our partners at Justice Africa have recently published a report of the In-Country Consultations 2013-2014. Below is the executive summary and foreword, by Chair of the Interim Board of the AUHRM, Andreas Ensheté. The full text of the report, as well as individual country consultation reports can be found on Justice Africa’s website. [...]

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This past May, returning to the Plaza de Mayo in central Buenos Aires after several years, I see that few things have changed. The “madres” and “abuelas”—mothers and grandmothers of those disappeared or murdered under Argentina’s military dictatorship (1976-1983)—still meet each Thursday afternoon in protest. The groups have splintered over the years, but by [...]

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“Are you looking for the museo?” Having taken the wrong metro exit, I surely looked like the standard lost gringa standing on a corner in the old neighborhood of Barrio Brasil on Santiago’s west side. It was on that corner that I found that a simple request for directions to the Museum of Memory could [...]

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It is no accident that a museum would provide the context for an unexpected and powerful human rights intervention. And, although Wiesel’s provocation cannot be understood absent the particular circumstances of Holocaust memorialization and contemporary genocide, the inherent potential of museums to spark new forms of human rights activism is not limited to this framework. In the years since 1993, museums are increasingly testing the waters of engagement on human rights issues.

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El impacto del conflicto armado que vive Colombia desde hace más de 50 años, aun tiene capítulos de los cuales las y los colombianos y el mundo no conocemos. Sin embargo, el Informe ¡Basta Ya! Colombia: memorias de guerra y dignidad, realizado por el Centro Nacional de Memoria Histórica[1] es un aporte valioso en la dirección correcta: narrar la verdad sobre las graves violaciones ocurridas en Colombia; develar la acción de todos los actores del conflicto, sus intereses y vínculos con las élites políticas y sociales en Colombia; rescatar la memoria de las víctimas y la persistencia de su sufrimiento; mostrar las políticas judiciales, gubernamentales y administrativas dirigidas a imponer justicia sobre el muro de impunidad existente; y recomendar medidas concretas para la superación de estos problemas.

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The account of armed conflict that has affected Colombia for more than 50 years still has chapters that are unknown to Colombians and the world. However, the report “Enough Already! Colombia: Memories of War and Dignity,” created by the National Center for Historical Memory [1], is a valuable step in the right direction and it serves a number of purposes: narrating the truth about the [most?] severe violations that have taken place; revealing the activities of all actors in the conflict, as well as their interests and links to national political and social elites; capturing the memory of the victims and the persistence of their suffering; highlighting judicial, administrative and governmental policies to begin to use judicial mechanism to create cracks in the wall of impunity; and recommending concrete measures to overcome these problems.

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