Currently viewing the tag: "Sudan"

The geographical inequality of income and investment in Sudan is striking. The figure below was drawn by me in the 1980s, based on an analysis of how the Sudanese economy had been restructured in the late 1970s and ‘80s, following the migration of most Sudanese professionals to the Gulf countries, and their remittances sent home, [...]

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Below is an excerpt from Alex de Waal’s essay, “Violence and peacemaking in the political marketplace” in Legitimacy and Peace Processes: from Coercion to Consent (Accord 25); pgs. 17 – 21. Full text available online.

The implication is the starting point for a legitimate process, leading to a legitimate agreement, is enabling the affected [...]

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Alex de Waal, Chad Hazlett, Christian Davenport and and Joshua Kennedy co-authored a new article in Social Science & Medicine,”The epidemiology of lethal violence in Darfur: Using micro-data to explore complex patterns of ongoing armed conflict.” Below is the abstract, full text available through the journal.

This article describes and analyzes patterns of lethal [...]

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In the ten days following September 23, Sudanese cities witnessed the largest anti-government protests in many years. Many of the protesters aimed to bring down the government; others sought a reversal of its recent decision to reduce fuel subsidies. The police and security services responded with lethal force, and according to Amnesty International, killed more [...]

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This is an unofficial translation of an article by the Sudanese political leader Ghazi Salahuddin, published last month, that has generated considerable debate in Sudan.

 

Since Sudan gained independence and began its journey as a newly-born country up until today, it is still assiduously attempting to transition from a weak state [...]

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Dear Monim,

 

I have long argued that humanitarians and human rights activists should embrace critical self-reflection including acknowledging their mistakes (see my piece, originally entitled “Writing rights and getting it wrong”.  So I welcome the change to debate–though not, of necessity, on everything. Monim puts his finger on two closely-related key issues, which [...]

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