Currently viewing the tag: "Sudan"

The presidents of Sudan and South Sudan have signed a series of eight agreements today in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The agreements address security, trade, oil, and citizenship. They are a major step forward.

However, several issues including the final status of Abyei area remain outstanding. The agreements also do not cover the conflict in the [...]

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Just over a year ago, on July 9, 2011, South Sudan achieved its much-coveted independence. At the celebrations in Juba, alongside innumerable presidents, foreign minister and heads of international organizations, were Sepp Blatter, President of FIFA and Issa Hayatou, head of the Confederation of African Football. For the new country, admission to international sporting associations [...]

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Whilst de Waal described the border committee as being “remarkably dysfunctional,” it eventually came up with a report that identified 4 disputed areas: Kafia Kingi, Abyei, Kaka and Jodha. A fifth area, Bahr al Arab, was added for political reasons. Crucially, related to events in the past weeks, Heglig – a region in to which SPLA troops have recently moved – was not in dispute.

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In summary, most of the time, everything in Sudanese political life, including the lives of ordinary people, is subordinate to tactical political calculus. When that political calculus changes, which may happen for diverse reasons, the rationale for inflicting atrocity also changes. It may lessen or disappear, and may then reappear, probably in a different form.

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The Darfur study demonstrates both the importance and the feasibility of event-based data collection in the midst of conflict, while pointing to a number of policy implications – from the utility of JMACs to the challenge of protecting civilians while adhering to peace operations doctrine. Analysts, conflict management practitioners and – most important – the victims of violence will benefit greatly from further work of this sort.

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The Darfur conflict arguably become more chaotic and less-intense since the initial outbreak of violence in 2003 and its height in 2003 and 2004. Even over the course of Jan 2008- July 2009, we see considerably decreases in the amount of lethal violence. Some one-time alliances had collapsed, raising serious concerns about the credibility of any agreement reached at the negotiating table.

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