Currently viewing the tag: "Syria"

Up to 40,000 members of Iraqi minority groups are at severe risk from the advancing forces of the Islamic State (IS or ISIS/ISIL). The most urgent crisis, according to accounts from eyewitnesses, news and humanitarian organizations, is the plight of the Yazidis—a small group that follows an ancient monotheistic religion that includes elements of [...]

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The news this week is particularly bad and worth highlighting not only for what it says about threats to civilians today, but how it might imply different strategies for civilian protection. Taken together, these stories suggest that there is an enormous protection gap where hubris once offered military intervention and promises of state-building as fail-proof [...]

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Published in the Yorkshire Post, September 12, 2013

I HAVE a visceral memory of the cell-phone photo of a man with his eye-lids pulled off by the Syrian secret police.

This photo was shown to me in the Za’atari refugee camp by a coffee shop owner from Dara, who had fled to the [...]

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The World Peace Foundation is honored to be a part of The Fletcher School, an intellectual community that is deeply engaged in world events. As the crisis in Syria has gained new urgency in light of the use of chemical weapons against civilians and subsequent U.S. proposal to bomb the Syrian regime, our [...]

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The United States is once again in a precarious international legal position in considering retaliatory military action against Assad’s use of chemical weapons against his people. The precedents of the Iraq invasion of 2003, the Kosovo bombing, and the unauthorized expansion of the UN Security Council support for action in Libya increase caution against attacking [...]

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Let’s return to the immediate aftermath of the deployment of chemical weapons on rebel-held areas of Syria attack on August 21, 2013.

Given the Obama administration’s previously stated “red line” that a chemical weapons attack represented, speculation began almost immediately that the U.S. would increase it military engagement in the conflict, likely by bombing [...]

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