Catapult

ACTIVITY HEADER

 

 

 

Name of Activity Catapult
Author Kara Miranda
Keywords design, challenge, build catapult, launch, LEGO, not classroom tested, k-3, 4-6, 7-9, prototype, Engineering Design Process, lever, fulcrum, force, load
Subject Simple Machines, LEGO Building
Grade Level K, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9+
Time 2 Hours Total
Brief Description An design challenge in which students will design and build a catapult and see which design will launch an object the furthest. This activity can use either Lego or non-Lego pieces. *This activity is not classroom tested.*
Lesson Objectives: To apply building techniques and knowledge about levers to an activity challenge.
Materials Needed: Simple Machine or RCX kits
Example photos of catapults
Assortment of extra LEGO pieces, especially beams
Engineer’s Planning Sheet
Plastic spoons
Rubber bands
Tongue depressors
Glue
Tape
Ruler (yardstick or tape measure)
Preparation and Set Up: Collect necessary materials

Photocopy worksheets
Arrange students into groups of 2

Decide how you will distribute extra pieces and other materials

Write design requirements on the board

Find a section of the floor at least 15 feet long and put tape down on one side. Students will place their finished catapults on this line and launch the object from there, and the teacher can measure how far it has gone.

Necessary Background Review three different classes of levers.

Vocabulary:
Prototype
Engineering Design Process

Catapult
Lever (first, second, and third class)
Fulcrum
Force
Load

Procedure
    • Tell students that in this challenge they will be making a catapult. Explain to them what a catapult is, making sure to go into levers and its three different classes. A catapult can mean any machine that hurls a projectile. Students can use either Legos or non-Lego materials to create their catapult.
    • Show students different pictures and/or videos of catapults, explaining what they do and how they work. Explain the engineering design process.
    • Tell them the requirements for their catapults. Examples of requirements are:
    •       Must be six inches tall
    •       Must launch a ball at least 6 feet
    • Allow the class to brainstorm different ideas for their catapult design. Have them plan out and draw their design on the engineering planning sheet.
  • Distribute materials and have students start building.
    • After students finish building their catapults, have them place their catapult on the line and launch an object (preferably something that will not roll, perhaps a Lego piece). Measure how far the catapult launched the object.
  • After the students finish, review the activity with the class. Have them share their ideas, ask groups to explain what the hardest part of the challenge was, etc.
Extensions: Have students redesign their catapult to make it launch objects even further.
Have a class-wide competition to see whose catapult launches the furthest.
Reference 1 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/111_image_1.jpg
Reference 2 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/111_image_2.jpg
Reference 3 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/Building_Design_Sheet3.pdf

Spin Art

ACTIVITY HEADER

 

 

 

Name of Activity Spin Art
Author Kara Miranda
Keywords open-ended, design, challenge, design, build, spin, create, art, markers, crayons, paint, art supplies, not classroom tested, NXT, toys, prototype, Engineering Design Process, Gears, gear ratios, 4-6, 7-9, 2 Hours Total
Subject NXTs
Grade Level 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9+
Time 2 Hours Total
Brief Description An open-ended design challenge in which students will design and build an object that will spin in some manner to create art with markers, crayons, paint, or other art supplies. *This activity is not classroom tested.*
Lesson Objectives: To apply building techniques and knowledge about gears to an activity challenge.
Materials Needed: RCX or NXT LEGO kits
Example photos of toys that create spin art
Assortment of extra LEGO pieces, especially gears and beams
Engineer’s Planning Sheet
Markers, crayons, paint, or other art supplies
Tape (to tape markers, crayons etc. to LEGO pieces)
Large sheets of paper to draw on
Preparation and Set Up: Collect necessary materials
Tape down large sheets of paper to floor if necessary
Photocopy worksheets
Arrange students into groups of 3
Decide how you will distribute extra pieces and drawing utensils
Write design requirements on the board
Necessary Background Review gears and gear ratios

Vocabulary:
Prototype
Engineering Design Process
Gears
Gear ratio

Procedure
  • Tell students that in this challenge they will be making spin art. Explain to them what spin art is and the different ways they can go about making it. Spin art is created by any medium spinning in some manner, whether it is the marker drawing in circles, paint being spun, or paper being rotated, etc. Students may attach these things to a car that they program, or a stationary object, or whatever they choose; this activity is very open ended for students design-wise.
  • Show students different pictures and/or videos of spin art toys, explaining what they do and how they work. Also, it may be a good idea to review how gears work. Explain the engineering design process, emphasizing the prototype and the redesign.
  • Tell them the requirements for their spin art makers. Examples of requirements are:
  •       Must have at least three gears
  •       Can be manual or electric
  •       Must use two different mediums (i.e. markers and paint, paint and crayons, etc)
  • Allow the class to brainstorm different ideas for their spin art design. Have them plan out and draw their design on the engineering planning sheet.
  • Distribute materials and have students start building. You may have to assist students with taping markers to their project.
  • After the students finish, review the activity with the class. Have them share their ideas, ask groups to explain what the hardest part of the challenge was, etc.
Extensions: Have students add more gears
Have students add more drawing utensils (more markers, etc)
Have students put their drawing utensils on different axes (i.e. one paintbrush horizontal and one marker vertical)
Have students add a sensor that causes something on their spin art maker to perform some act (i.e. when the light sensor senses white, the blue marker starts spinning)
Reference 1 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/a.jpg
Reference 2 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/b.jpg
Reference 3 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/c1.pdf

Paper Towers

ACTIVITY HEADER

 

 

 

Name of Activity Paper Towers
Author STOMP
Keywords towers, constraints, materials, weight, Engineering Design Process, sturdy structures, strong shapes, architect, design, prototype, redesign
Subject Non-LEGO
Grade Level K, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Time 1 Hour Total
Brief Description Students will build towers out of a limited amount of materials that can hold up a set amount of weight (like a stack of books).
Lesson Objectives: To introduce students to the engineering design process.
To teach students about sturdy structures and strong shapes.
Materials Needed: For each student group:

Activity worksheet
18 inches of tape
5 paper clips
5 index cards
8 sheets of 8-1/2 x 11 paper
Some sort of weight to put on the tower (like a stack of books)

Preparation and Set Up: - Arrange students into groups of 2.
- Gather materials and photocopy worksheets.
- Make a poster or handouts of the engineering design process.
Necessary Background The engineering design process is an eight step process that engineers use to design

1. Identify the need or problem
2. Research the need or problem
3. Develop possible solution(s)
4. Select the best possible solution(s)
5. Construct a prototype
6. Test and evaluate the solution(s)
7. Communicate the solution(s)
8. Redesign

Vocabulary:
You can highlight any of the following vocabulary in this lesson:

Engineering design process
Engineer
Architect
Design
Prototype
Redesign
Sturdy

Procedure
  1. Begin the lesson by introducing the engineering design process. Explain how students will use the engineering design process in their lesson to construct a tower out of paper:
    1. Identify Problem: You need to build a tower that will support a weight (stack of books).
    2. Research: discuss as a class some ways that you might make your tower sturdy, like how to distribute the weight, what shapes might help you, etc.
    3. Develop Possible Solutions: The class will draw out some possible designs on a sheet of papers.
    4. Select the Best Possible solution(s): Student groups should discuss their ideas and select one design to actually build.
    5. Construct a Prototype: Students will build their towers
    6. Test and evaluate: Students will test their designs by placing the weight on their towers. Students can either tests their designs as they finish, or each group can test in front of the class when everyone has finished building. How much weight can the tower hold?
    7. Communicate the solution(s): Have students share their designs. Discuss as a class the following questions:
      1. What designs seemed to work the best?
      2. What were some ways that towers failed?
        1. did they tip over or crush?
      3. What were some shapes that worked best to hold the towers?
      4. What materials seemed to be most useful?
    8. Redesign: In this activity students will not actually redesign their structures, but you should discuss as a class how different groups might improve their designs.
Extensions: Have students redesign their towers. How does the second tower’s performance compare to the first? What were some design changes?
Reference 1 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/tower_worksheet.doc

Building a Mini Golf Course

ACTIVITY HEADER

 

 

 

Name of Activity Building a Mini Golf Course
Author STOMP
Keywords design, obstacle, groups
Subject NXTs
Grade Level 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9+
Time 3 Hours Total
Brief Description The class will work in pairs to build a mini golf course. Each group will design a different obstacle for the course.
Lesson Objectives: To use sturdy building to build an obstacle that can withstand being hit by a ball.
To design a moving obstacle.
To program the obstacle to move.
To work as a class to achieve a goal.
Materials Needed: - LEGO NXT kits
- Extra motors and gears
Preparation and Set Up: - Arrange students into groups of 2
- Distribute LEGO NXT kits
Procedure
  1. Have students construct a pathway for the golf ball to travel down.
  2. Have students use a motor to construct an obstacle that the golfer has to pass to get the ball into the hole.
  3. Use sensors to activate or disarm the obstacle.
  4. Place the RCX out of the way of the golf course.
  5. Some ideas for obstacles students can build are:
    1. A claw
    2. A windmill
    3. Revolving doors
    4. Rotating platform
    5. Bat
  6. Program the RCX so that the obstacle reacts as the student wants.
  7. Have all the students put their designs together to complete the golf course.
  8. Test each golf hole with either a miniature ball or a real golf ball.
Extensions: Build a putter that will hit the golf ball onto the course.
Use trigonometry to find out how to get a hole-in-one for your golf course.
Have a mini-golf competition using the obstacles.
Modifications: This activity works well as a final project.
Reference 1 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/84_image_2.png
Reference 2 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/aarongolf.doc
Reference 3 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/Justin-2-STOMP.doc
Reference 4 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/Margules-Obstacle-2-STOMP.doc
Reference 5 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/Melissa.doc
Reference 6 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/Mini-Golf-DiCarlo-2-STOMP.doc

Everyday Materials Backscratcher

ACTIVITY HEADER

 

 

 

Name of Activity Invent a Backscratcher from Everyday Materials
Author Tufts STOMP
Keywords found materials, recyclables, design, assessment
Subject Non-LEGO
Grade Level K, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Time 1 Hour Total
Brief Description Students are given a variety of every day materials and recyclables. With these materials, students will need to create a back-scratching device. Once all the students have completed their backscratchers, they are assessed within the class.
Lesson Objectives: To learn about designing for real life problems.
Materials Needed: Tape
String
Cardboard
Paper towel rolls
Scissors
Glue
Any other materials the instructor wishes to provide.
Procedure
  1. Prepare a table or station with the materials the students will use. Make sure that there are enough materials for the class.
  2. Introduce the activity and allow the students to look over the materials so that they can brainstorm.
    1. Pose some questions to help with brainstorming:
      1. What is a good design for a backscratcher?
      2. Which is it hard to scratch your back?
      3. Why is it better to use a backscratcher than use your hand?
  3. Have students brainstorm their idea on a sheet of paper, they must sketch their design before they are allowed to build.
  4. Check that designs are well thought out and not dangerous before allowing students to start their projects.
  5. When students have completed their backscratchers, have students lay them out on a table so that everyone in the class can see each design. Encourage student to carefully try out different designs. Remind them to be respectful of everyone’s designs.
  6. After everyone has had a chance to see all the designs, gather the students for a class discussion. Ask students:
    1. What worked best?
    2. What materials did you use? Which materials worked best?
    3. What would you do differently?
    4. What else could you use to build a backscratcher?
    5. What else could the backscratcher be used for?
    6. What is your favorite design and why?
    7. What makes the designs different from each other?
Extensions: Students an make an advertisement for their backscratcher.
Reference 1 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/Backscratcher.doc

Whale Adaptations: Creature of the Sea

ACTIVITY HEADER

 

 

 

Name of Activity Whale Adaptations: Creature of the Sea
Author STOMP
Keywords design, creature, adaptation, ocean, problem-solving, sturdy structure, moving parts
Subject Non-LEGO, LEGO Building
Grade Level K, 1, 2, 3
Time 4 Hours Total
Brief Description Students will use LEGOs to design a creature that is adapted to life in the ocean.
Lesson Objectives: To apply engineering problem-solving strategies to creat a sturdy structure with LEGOs that has a least one moving part.
To demonstrate an understanding of animal adapations by designing a creature with features adapted to life in the ocean to help it breathe, eat, move, protect itself, and adjust to warm and cold temperatures.
Materials Needed: Sea Creatures Design Brainstorming sheet
Sea Creatures Design Worksheet
Our Sea Creature Paragraph planning Worksheet
LEGO kits
Preparation and Set Up: Make photocopies of worksheets.

Arrange students in groups of two.

Distribute necessary materials.

Necessary Background Vocabulary:
Adaptations
Procedure
  1. Introduce the concept of animal adaptations, with a focus on whales. (e.g., blowholes for breathing, blubber for warmth and feeding in winter, baleen teeth for eating, fins/flippers/flukes for moving though water, warm blood for keeping warm)
  2. Review different types of adaptations that would help different creatures survive in the ocean. (e.g., clam shells for protection, bird’s wings and hollow bones for flight, cat’s whiskers for feeling)
  3. Have each student fill out a sea creature adaptation brainstorming sheet.
  4. Have students get into their groups and combine ideas to make come up with a sea creature that the group wants to design. Each design should have at least one element from every group members original brainstorm.
  5. Students should complete a Sea Creature Design Worksheet as a group.
  6. Distribute kits and allow students to start building.
  7. Each student should write a paragraph describing his/her creature. They will include a name for their creature and at least 3 features that are an adaptation to life in the sea.
  8. Students will present their work to the class, demonstrating and describing all adaptations.
Reference 1 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/Lesson-1-Creature-of-the-Sea.pdf
Reference 2 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/Lesson-1-Our-Sea-Creature.pdf
Reference 3 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/Lesson-1-Sea-Creature-Design-Sheet.pdf
Online Reference(s) http://www.ceeo.tufts.edu/robolabatceeo–CEEOCurriculumWebsite

Animal Adaptations

ACTIVITY HEADER

 

 

 

Name of Activity Animal Adaptations
Author Emily Ryan
Keywords animal adaptations, environments, design, build, unique, animal, animals, found materials, adapt, modeling
Subject Non-LEGO, LEGO Building
Grade Level K, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Time 1 Hour Total
Brief Description This activity explores animal’s adaptations to their environments. Students will look at
animal adaptations and then design and build their own unique animal that could live
in their backyard.
Lesson Objectives: To teach students about animals and why they have certain adaptations for
particular environments.
To teach students to design and build a model based on particular constraints.
Materials Needed: pipe cleaners
feathers
cloth
glue
string
tape
popsicle sticks
any available building materials
Preparation and Set Up: Gather an assortment of building materials (can use LEGOs or not).
Collect some research on animals and their adaptations.
Pictures of an environment that the animals need to adapt to.
If desired, break students into groups of 2 – 4.
Distribute materials to students.
Necessary Background Animals adapt to their environment in many different ways. The most evident adaptation
is color and texture. Camouflage is used by many animals to protect themselves from
predators. Some examples include tree frogs, polar bears, and iguanas. Animals may also
be colored to make them appear to be something they are not. Moths and butterflies
often have coloration that makes their wings look like eyes. Animals also adapt to their
environment. Giraffes developed long necks to allow them to reach food at the tops
of trees. Arctic foxes have snow white coats during the winter which they shed to
reveal a light brown coat for the summer months

Vocabulary:
Adaptation
Design
Modeling

Procedure
  1. Introduce animal adaptations to students, giving examples of familiar and unfamiliar animals that have different adaptations that help them live in a particular environment.
    1. The attached document labeled AnimalAdaptPres.pdf can be used to present info on animal adaptations to students
  2. Tell students that their backyards have a certain environment.
    1. Have students brainstorm some aspects of their backyard environments including:
      1. Space.
      2. Available foods.
      3. Places to make a home.
      4. Year round temperature.
      5. Dangers (pets/cars/people)
    2. If time, let students draw a picture of their backyard.
  3. Distribute building materials and tell students to build a model of an animal that might live in their backyard. Tell the students to build the animal with adaptations for the environment in their backyard.
  4. At the end of class, have students or student groups present their animal to the class.
    1. Students should mention the adaptations that the animal has.
    2. Students should explain how their animal moves, behaves, what it eats, where it lives, etc.
Reference 1 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/AnimalAdaptPres.pdf

Things That Go Bump

ACTIVITY HEADER

 

 

 

Name of Activity Things That Go Bump
Author STOMP
Keywords design, construct, NXT, car, bump, wall, damage, touch sensors
Subject NXTs
Grade Level 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9+
Time 1 Hour Total
Brief Description In this activity, students will design and construct an NXT car that will stop when it
bumps into a wall to prevent damage to the car.
Lesson Objectives: - To learn to program with touch sensors.
- To create a safety device for an NXT car.
Materials Needed: - NXT Car.
- Assortment of LEGO pieces.
- Computer running NXT software.
Preparation and Set Up:
Set up computers running NXT software.

Arrange students in groups of two.
Distribute necessary material to students.

Necessary Background Vocabulary:
Prototype
Procedure
  1. Have students draw out the design for the bumper that they will attach to the front of their car
  2. Have students build an NXT car.
  3. Have students attach a bumper to their car attached to the touch sensor so that the car can respond when it drives into a wall.
  4. Wire the motors to the outputs and the sensors to the inputs of the NXT.
  5. Program the NXT vehicle:
    1. If using NXT MINDSTORMS software, program the car to stop when it hits a wall.
    2. Once students have program their car to stop when the touch sensor is pressed, have students program their car to back up and turn after the car hits a wall, before driving forward again. This program requires a loop.
Reference 1 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/69_image_3.jpg
Reference 2 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/69_image_3.png
Reference 3 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/Bumper_car.doc

Tow Truck

ACTIVITY HEADER

 

 

 

Name of Activity Tow Truck
Author STOMP
Keywords steep, ramp, tow, towing, weight, gears, gear up, gear down, building, design, friction, gravity, center of gravity
Subject NXTs
Grade Level 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9+
Time 1 Hour Total
Brief Description Build a car that can climb a steep ramp while towing a weight (10 batteries) behind it.
Using gears to gear down is necessary for this challenge. This activity is more challenging
than a regular ramp climb and may require some complex building and design.
Lesson Objectives: - To learn to build and use gears.
- To learn about gravity, center of gravity, and friction.
Materials Needed: NXT kits
ramp
batteries for weight
string
computers running NXT Software
Preparation and Set Up: Build a ramp.

Set up computers running NXT software.

Arrange student in groups of two.
Distribute necessary materials.

Necessary Background It is more difficult for cars to climb steep slopes for different reasons. In this lesson you
can discuss with the class these different forces that affect the ability of the car to
climb the slope:

Friction – friction is the force acting between the surfaces of the car (tires) and
the ramp surface. This is the force that keeps the car from slipping.
Gravity – gravity pulls down directly towards the center of the earth. On a flat
surface gravity does not pull a car in any direction, but just keeps it in place. On
a slope, gravity pulls a car backwards towards the center of the earth down the ramp.
Center of gravity – Center of gravity is the exact spot on an object where there
is the same amount of weight on one side of the spot as there is on the opposite
side. A high center of gravity means a car is more unstable on a steep slope.
A low center of gravity close to a ramp will help the car stay on the ramp.To
overcome these forces there are several things that you can do to your car:
Low center of gravity – design the car to be low to the ground.
Gear down the car – By adding gears to the motors and then gearing to the
wheel you can increase the power of the motors, which will help the car climb
the ramp. There is more information about gears and gear worksheets in the
attached documents.

Vocabulary:
Gears
Gear Ratios
Gravity
Center of Gravity
Mass
Friction
Forces

Procedure
  1. Have students design and build a car that will climb a ramp.
    1. Students will need to think about friction and center of gravity to build their car. If students are unfamiliar with these concepts, you should review the concepts with them. A car that is lower to the ground will be less likely to slip. Wheels that have more traction and greater surface area on the ramp will also be less likely to slip.
    2. Students will need to use gears to gain more power. If students are unfamiliar with using gears, you should review gears and gearing down with the students.
  2. Have students program their cars to move forward for 20 seconds.
  3. Allow students to test their cars on the ramp without anything in tow.
  4. Students should redesign the car if it does not climb the ramp.
  5. Students should then test their cars while towing the weight up the ramp and redesign until the car can tow the weight.
  6. If students have trouble tell them to try various gears, wheels and designs.
Extensions: What is the steepest ramp that the car can climb?
What is the heaviest weight that the car can tow?
Calculate the gear ratio.
What is the quickest that the car can travel up the ramp?
Reference 1 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/68_image_1.png
Reference 2 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/68_image_2.png
Reference 3 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/Engineering-and-Science-Skills1.doc
Reference 4 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/Engineering_Design_Process3.doc
Reference 5 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/Gear_Ratio_Worksheet1.pdf
Reference 6 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/Gears_Worksheet1.pdf
Reference 7 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/Tow_truck.doc

Bicycle Unit: Monster Bikes

ACTIVITY HEADER

 

 

 

Name of Activity Bicycle Unit: Monster Bike
Author STOMP
Keywords audience, design, monster bike, specific needs, target audience, prototype
Subject Non-LEGO
Grade Level 4, 5, 6
Time 1 Hour Total
Brief Description Students will talk about how engineers have to consider the audience that they are designing for before creating a design. Students will use this discussion to design a bike for a monster with specific needs.
Lesson Objectives: - To understand targeting audiences in engineering design.
- To practice drawing and producing prototypes.
Materials Needed: - Large poster sized paper
- Large colored markers
- Monster Bike Handouts
Preparation and Set Up: - Arrange students in groups of 2 – 3.
- Distribute materials to each group.
Necessary Background When engineers design machines, they have to be aware of the audience that they are targeting with their product. there are many features of the bike that make it not only pleasing to the human eye, but comfortable and practical for human use. for example, a bike for a little girl might be small enough for her, have training wheels to help her ride, be painted her favorite color, and have frilly streamers coming off the sides.

There are many questions that an engineer has ask about their audience. A few examples are:

Who is the audience?

What sort of features does the target audience wand on their machine?

What does the audience like? dislike?

What can the audience do? not do?

Does the product look appealing to the audience?

Does the product function for the audience?

Vocabulary:
Audience
Engineering design

Procedure
  1. Tell students to brainstorm what a vehicle might look like when the target audience is a monster.
  2. Tell students that, like a bike, the monster will power the vehicle. Tell the students that their vehicle does not have to look anything like a bike and to be creative.
  3. The monster:
    1. Is as tall as three people.
    2. Weighs 500 pounds.
    3. Has three very long arms.
    4. Has no eyes.
    5. Uses his front antennae to feel around.
    6. Gets seasick when he leans forward.
    7. Can hear very well.
    8. Can blow lots and lots of air.
    9. Has a very large bottom.
    10. Likes to ride over rocky and hilly surfaces.
    11. Has very short legs and small feet.
    12. Has a very delicate head.
    13. Has very large hands.
  4. Have the students draw out their prototype of the vehicle on the poster. Have each group pick a catchy slogan to write on the poster.
  5. On the worksheet, have students write down features of the vehicle and why they included these features.
  6. Display the posters in the front of the class.
  7. Allow each group to show off 2 -3 features of their vehicle and share why they included them as if they were selling the vehicle to the monster.
  8. Have a class discussion about the designs. Ask students:
    1. Which of the monster’s characteristics made it most difficult to design the vehicle?
    2. Are any features on different groups designs similar? Why or why not?
    3. Would this vehicle work for a human? Why or why not?
    4. Which features would the monster like the best? Which would he dislike?
Reference 1 http://sites.tufts.edu/stompactivitydatabase/files/formidable/monster1.pdf

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