NASA TETRIX Projects

Day 17: Wednesday, 7/27

by on Jul.27, 2011, under Week 4

Today we had our absolutely final demos.  The Axel Rover worked well except during the demo it got tangled in it’s own fishing line, a seemingly common problem now that the spool is attached externally, rather than on the rover.  The Carrier Bot’s ramp was not demonstrable as the program for lowering and raising the ramp does not dynamically adjust for the amount of power left in the battery pack, and thus the amount of power the motor is getting.  Apparently Sarah and Briyana wrote the code for lowering/raising the ramp on a battery pack with low energy, so when a new battery pack was inserted the ramp overextends and thus is unusable, as the over-extension is what caused the motor’s to start smoking in the first place.  Dean’s iPad bot worked flawlessly inside, including on the conference room table, however the fact that one motor starts before the other (rather than both simultaneously – the code says start both at the same time) was made more evident when the ground had more friction; ie. pebbles.  After that hour-long demo, we gave our demos again to the elementary school students having summer camp at the CEEO.  The iPad controller worked perfectly, the Carrier Bot had the same ramp issue, and the Axel Rover went on a grass hill way too steep for it and promptly got tangled in it’s fishing line again, promptly cutting it apart.  After the demos (and a bit before), we sorted LEGO and TETRIX kits; we have 10 and 9, respectively.  So far, 4 LEGO and 2 TETRIX kits are entirely sorted.  The final hour was spent playing an intense capture-the-hidden-flag.  The only reason team Purple (Sarah, Lawrence, Me) won was because team Pink hid their notebook (the flag), under a car; which drove away.

Daily Thoughts:

Dean: Presented to Morgan and Co.  The Thai food was good. Cleaned up the room, no longer such a mess.  CTF fun.

Jess: This day was marked mostly by mediocrity on the part of the robot. We finally tested it outside with the spiral code, and that worked pretty nicely, except for some sort of mysterious spinning in place upon completion of the code, which I could not trace back to the code I wrote at all. I suppose most of the robot actually wasn’t mediocre, in retrospect. The wire/spool apparatus and use were mediocre. Tetrix is mediocre is the point. The wire kept getting wrapped around on things, and at one point it got cut by the robot itself, making us look like we had no idea what we were talking about in front of the elementary schoolers.

Briyana: We presented our project twice, to a few CEEO workers and elementary school students. I also began reorganizing the TETRIX and LEGO kits.

Sarah: I realized in the morning that the ramp for the robot wouldn’t work because when we tested the ramp and it worked, the motor battery level was lower than it was at this moment.  This caused the motor to go much further and the door/ramp would go 180 degrees rather than 90 degrees.


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