The Marienschrein and the Legend of Charlemagne: Textile Relics and Transferences of Meaning

Image List

Slide 1, Photographs of Four Great Relics of Aachen and Unknown Painting, all from the Aachen Cathedral website http://www.heiligtumsfahrt2007.de/index47-0.aspx

Slide 2, Marienschrein, Workshop of the Aachen Master, 1239

Slide 3, Marienkleid, Robe of the Virgin. Pilgrimage Badge showing the Marienkleid, Aachen, 1375-1450.

Slide 4, Charlemagne, Agostino Cornacchini, 1720-1725, Basilica di San Pietro, Vatican and Saint Charlemagne, Theodoric of Prague, 1360-1364, paint and gold on panel.

Slide 5, Marienschrein, Workshop of the Aachen Master, 1239

Slide 6, Details of Mary and Pope Leo III, Marienschrein, Workshop of the Aachen Master, 1239

Slide 7, Detail of Charlemagne, Karlsschrein, Workshop of the Aachen Master, 1215. Charlemagne flanked by Pope Leo III and Bishop Turpin of Rheims, with bust of Christ Pantocrater above, Karlsschrein, Workshop of the Aachen Master, 1215.

Slide 8, Lateral wall, Karlsschrein, Workshop of the Aachen Master, 1215. Detail of Otto IV, Karlsschrein, Workshop of the Aachen Master, 1215.

Charlemagne presenting model of Aachen Cathedral to the Virgin, roof relief, Karlsschrein, Workshop of the Aachen Master, 1215.

Slide 9, Throne of Charlemagne at Aachen and Dome of Aachen Cathedral

Slide 10, The coronation of Charlemagne by God’s hand. Charlemagne shown as an idealized king, flanked by Popes Gelasisus I. and Gregory I,

Sacramentary of Charles the Bald (c. 870)

Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département des Manuscrits, ms. Latin 1141, fol. 2v

Emperor Charlemagne, Albrecht Durer, 1512

Emperor Charlemagne, Anonymous artists, woodcut, published 20 March    1475

Jean Fouquet, Grandes chroniques de France: ms. fr. 6465: fol. 96: Charlemagne supervises building of Palatine Chapel, Aachen, 15th century

Slide 11, Marienschrein showing Christ and Charlemagne, Workshop of the Aachen Master, 1239

Marienschrein, Workshop of the Aachen Master, 1239.

Slide 12, Letter “A” Reliquary of Charlemagne, before 1107, Abbey Ste. Foy, Conques, Workshop of Abbot Begon III

Slide 13, Two parts of the Veil (chemise) of the Virgin at Chartres: Embroidered Wrapping (Byzantium, 8th century, Empress Irene?), White Silk (1st century), and current reliquary (19th century)

Slide 14, Charlemagne window at Chartres Cathedral, c. 1225

Slide 15, Panels 3 (Constantine’s dream of Charlemagne), 4 (Battle in which Charlemagne delivers Jerusalem from the Saracens), and 13 (Charlemagne orders the foundation of a church)

Slide 16, Panels 6 (Charlemagne receives relics from Constantine) and 7 (Charlemagne donates relics to Aachen Cathedral)

Slide 17, Panel 1 (Donation Panel)

Slide 18, Postcards from the Aachen Pilgrimage

Karl, Workshop of the Aachen Master, 1239

Slide 19, Detail of Charlemagne, Marienschrein, Workshop of the Aachen Master, 1239

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