Photography

1st Place: Bull’s Eye

April D. Jewell, Graduate Student, Chemistry, School of Arts and Sciences
Charles H. Sykes, Chemistry, School of Arts and Sciences

Click on the image to view original.

Abstract

Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) is a powerful imaging technique that allows for the visualization of surfaces on the atomic scale. Using STM, objects with dimensions as small as a billionth of a meter (nanometer), including atoms and molecules, can be studied and even controlled. This STM image gives both topographic and electronic information about a cluster of molecules on a metal surface. Concentric rings show electron waves bouncing off the cluster at the center of the bull’s eye. As you move away from the center, the electron waves become more diffuse and the image appears out of focus. Image dimensions: ~25 nm x 15 nm .

2nd Place: Digital single lens reflex camera adaptor for anterior and posterior segment photography

Chris Pirie, Assistant Professor, Clinical Science, Division of Ophthalmology, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine

Click on image to view original.

Abstract

My research is focusing on alterative and cost effective solutions for imaging of the eye. Currently available models, particularly those devoted to imaging the posterior segment (i.e. fundus cameras), can exceed thousands of dollars and may be cost prohibitive. Furthermore, some systems are heavy, immobile, and limited in their versatility. To combat these issues (i.e. cost, versatility, and portability), I am working on a camera adaptor which can be utilized using any standard digital single reflex camera. This system is portable, lightweight, and of significant cost savings. Using a series of beam splitters and mirrors, it provides true coaxial illumination using a single LED during viewing and the camera flash itself during exposure. Reflections from the cornea and/or lens(s) are essentially eliminated due to placement of polarizing filters. The anterior segment (front of the eye) is readily imaged using a standard camera lens. Placement of an additional accessory lens (i.e. indirect ophthalmic lens) allows for imaging of the posterior segment (back of the eye; fundus). This simple adaptor aims to increase the availability of diagnostic capabilities necessary for the practitioner and researcher, both physician and veterinarian, to assess, document, and follow the progression of numerous ophthalmic related conditions.

3rd Place: InfoBiology: Steganography by Printed Arrays of Microbes (SPAM)

Manuel A. Palacios, Postdoctoral Associate, Chemistry, School of Arts and Sciences
Elena Benito-Peña, Chemistry,  School of Arts and Sciences
Mael Manesse, Postdoctoral Associate, Chemistry, School of Arts and Sciences
David R. Walt, Professor, Chemistry, School of Arts and Sciences

Click on the image to view original.

Abstract

In InfoBiology, we use living organisms as the carriers of encoded messages. We encode messages by controlling gene expression and/or cell replication and use them as cipher keys for the delivery of information genetically encoded in organisms. The messages, called SPAM (Steganography by Printed Arrays of Microbes) consist of a matrix of fluorescent spots generated by seven strains of E. coli colonies, with each strain expressing a different FP. The fluorescence image submitted shows a SPAM consisting of 144 colonies encoding a message containing 72 characters in a septenary code. The message is read from left to right along lines that read top to bottom. The message reads “this bioencoded message is from the walt lab @ tufts university 2011”.