Archive for February, 2012

Feb 29 2012

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The Future of Energy – Carl Pope at Harvard, Wednesday 3/7

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Finding secure, safe and reliable sources of energy to power world economic growth will be one of the great challenges of this century. The Harvard University Center for the Environment invites the Harvard community to take up the challenge by participating in this ongoing series of discussions.

THE FUTURE OF ENERGY

Carl Pope, Former Chairman, Sierra Club

“Bringing Back America:  How reviving our manufacturing sector is the big issue in the 2012 election”

Wednesday, March 7
5:00 pm

Harvard University
Science Center D
1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Carl Pope will discuss why advanced, green-tech and clean energy technologies are the key to the America that most of us want, and what the federal government needs to do.

He is the former Chairman of the Sierra Club, an American environmental organization founded by conservationist John Muir in 1892. Pope was first appointed Executive Director in 1992, and served until January 20, 2010, when he was appointed Chairman. He led the Sierra Club’s efforts to help protect 10 million acres of wilderness, including California’s Giant Sequoia National Monument, and brought litigation challenging the right of then-Vice President Dick Cheney’s energy task force to secretly hash out energy policy with major oil companies. Pope also co-authored California’s Proposition 65, which allowed citizens to sue polluters if they failed to comply with the law. More recently, he helped block 150 proposed coal-fired power plants.

Pope has worked with the Sierra Club for more than 30 years, and has served as a board member for other organizations, including the National Clean Air Coalition, California Common Cause, and Public Interest Economics Inc. He has served as Political Director for Zero Population Growth.

The Future of Energy lecture series is sponsored by the Harvard University Center for the Environment with generous support from Bank of America. This lecture is also sponsored by the Harvard Law School. All of the lectures are free and open to the public. View detailed lecture information at http://environment.harvard.edu/events/2011-11-30/future-energy

Contact:
Lisa Matthews
Assistant Director of Events and Communications
Harvard University Center for the Environment

24 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
lisa_matthews@harvard.edu
p. 617-495-8883
f. 617-496-0425

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24 Oxford St.
Cambridge, MA 02138

T: (617) 495-0368

www.environment.harvard.edu
Copyright (C) 2008 Harvard University. All rights reserved.

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Feb 20 2012

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“Like” us on Facebook!

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If you’re reading this, you clearly have an interest in something to do with the Tufts Energy Conference. Why not like us on Facebook? You’ll get updates on events, conference developments, and opportunities like the Tufts Energy Competition all right in your newsfeed. Don’t worry, they don’t overdo it.

Here’s the link:

https://www.facebook.com/tuftsenergyconference?sk=wall

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Feb 20 2012

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Priced Carbon, Prosperous Coal

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The idea behind a carbon tax is that all of a sudden, high-carbon sources of energy start to look less attractive, right? Well, that’s apparently not the case in Australia. Even a Carbon tax on the horizon, investment in coal, the highest-carbon fuel source has increased 62 percent.

See the article here

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Why do you think this is? Is it the case, as some have suggested, that government action on CO2 emissions is destined to fall far short of being meaningful? Alternatively, if countries’ domestic policies prevent them from burning coal for electricity, but maintain the attractiveness of mining coal for export, are the countries successfully meeting the objective of lowering carbon emissions?

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Feb 16 2012

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Moomaw-Everett debate 2012

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Last Thursday, Fletcher School Professors William Moomaw and Bruce Everett got together for the ninth time to debate climate change, energy and the environment, at an event in ASEAN auditorium. Professor Moomaw is a Professor of Environmental Policy, and lead coauthor of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, while Professor Everett is a former employee of Exxon Mobil who teaches Petroleum in the Global Economy at the Fletcher School. The debate was organized by the Fletcher Energy Consortium (FLEC). The Center for International Environment and Resource Policy’s writeup of the event here .

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Both professors gave the international community a “D” on dealing with climate change and the environment, though for different reasons. Do you agree? Alternatively, have leaders done the best that can be expected under the circumstances, given domestic constraints, structural barriers, and lack of a common frame for responsibility? Or have expectations of the effects of climate change been exaggerated, given the large band of uncertainty in questions about the net warming effects of elements like cloud cover, and potential increased plant growth?

Professor Everett indicated that, given future trends in energy use, efforts we make in the developed world to address Carbon emissions will make little difference in global emissions in the future, since increases in emissions from China and India will dwarf any reductions made in the West. Do you agree? If not, how can the developing world increase access to energy without dramatic increases in Carbon emissions?

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Feb 13 2012

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Lecture: California’s Low-Carbon Energy Future

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This event at Harvard, put on by the  Harvard University Center for the Environment, may be of interest to readers of this blog:

Finding secure, safe and reliable sources of energy to power world economic growth will be one of the great challenges of this century. The Harvard University Center for the Environment invites the Harvard community to take up the challenge by participating in this ongoing series of discussions.

THE FUTURE OF ENERGY

Mary D. Nichols, Chairman of the California Air Resources Board

“California’s Low Carbon Energy Future”

Monday, February 27
5:00 pm

Harvard University
Austin Hall North
Harvard Law School
1515 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Mary D. Nichols, Chairman of the California Air Resources Board, will discuss the state’s pioneering climate policies and the future of energy in California and beyond.

Nichols has devoted her entire career in public and nonprofit service to advocating for the environment and public health. In addition to her work at the Air Board, she has served as Assistant Administrator for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Air and Radiation program under President Clinton, Secretary for California’s Resources Agency from 1999 to 2003 and Director of the Institute of the Environment at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Her priorities as chairman include moving ahead on the state’s landmark climate change program (AB 32), steering the Board through numerous efforts to curb diesel pollution at ports and continuing to pass regulations aimed at providing cleaner air for Southern California and the San Joaquin Valley. She values innovation, partnerships and common-sense approaches to addressing the state’s air issues.

The Future of Energy lecture series is sponsored by the Harvard University Center for the Environment with generous support from Bank of America. This lecture is also sponsored by the Harvard Law School. All of the lectures are free and open to the public. View detailed lecture information at http://environment.harvard.edu/events/2011-11-30/future-energy

Map to Austin Hall: http://map.harvard.edu/?ctrx=759170&ctry=2962664&level=9&layers=Campus%20Base%20and%20Buildings,Map%20Text

Contact:
Lisa Matthews
Assistant Director of Events and Communications
Harvard University Center for the Environment

24 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
lisa_matthews@harvard.edu
p. 617-495-8883
f. 617-496-0425

Become a Fan of HUCE on Facebook!

*|LIST:Future of Energy|*

Unsubscribe kathleen.hurley@tufts.edu from this list.

Our mailing address is:
24 Oxford St.
Cambridge, MA 02138

T: (617) 495-0368

www.environment.harvard.edu
Copyright (C) 2008 Harvard University. All rights reserved.

Forward this email to a friend

No responses yet

Feb 09 2012

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A letter on the Keystone XL pipeline

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Thanks to Conference Operations Director Kathleen Hurley for sharing this Letter to the Editor.

The Keystone XL pipeline extension is a proposed project to transport synthetic crude and diluted bitumen from Canada’s oil sands in Alberta. The pipeline requires presidential approval before it can go forward. The pipeline has encountered fierce resistance from the environmental community, largely coming from a combination of worries about the large quantity of greenhouse gas emissions coming from production of the fuel and concerns about damage to local environments and aquifers. President Obama had originally planned to postpone the decision until 2013, but  was recently required by legislation to expedite the decision-making process, which led him to reject the permit application.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/08/opinion/tar-sands-and-the-pipeline.html?_r=2&scp=2&sq=harvard%20environment&st=cse

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Do you agree with the author of the letter? Are greenhouse gas emissions in canada an appropriate reason to stop a pipeline in the United States? Will the Canadians simply export the oil to the the coast, leading to the same amount of emissions, without creating jobs in the United States?

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Feb 08 2012

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Electric Avenue

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Well, it’s more like an electric highway. As has been discussed on this blog, the principal challenge for electric vehicles to date has been the limits of battery technology, and the ability to a) drive long distances and b) charge quickly. A group of Stanford researchers have taken an innovative approach to this challenge, suggesting a future in which cars charge as they drive, through infrastructure in the highways that generates magnetic fields to transmit electric currents.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/02/07/stanford-electric-car-highway_n_1260399.html

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Is this feasible? Is this approach worth the investment? With an infrastructure that is sorely in need of maintenance, is  public funding an appropriate avenue for the viability of the electric car, or should the approach be more market-based?

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