Daily Archives: October 20, 2011

Sustainability Program Manager, GreenerU

Boston area-based GreenerU seeks a sustainability program manager to oversee implementation of sustainability programs at colleges and universities. The position will lead in the planning and delivery of operational developments and community engagement in campus sustainability initiatives. The ideal candidate will come from an interdisciplinary educational background and have proven work experience that is directly relevant to sustainability program implementation in the university setting.

Community Carbon Fund Project Coordinator, Yale University

Yale University (CT) seeks a part-time community carbon fund project coordinator responsible for managing, implementing, developing and promoting the Yale Community Carbon Fund in its third year. During this time, the Carbon Fund will install insulation in local households and solar thermal panels on local nonprofit organizations, tracking the offsets created from these initiatives. The coordinator will foster collaborative working relationships with local municipal and nonprofit organizations to achieve programmatic goals. Successful candidates will have a bachelor’s degree and three years of experience in community involvement.

Tufts Bikes Ride into Boston!

Join Tufts Bikes this Saturday, October 22 on a ride into Boston to watch the Head of the Charles Regatta and explore Harvard Square!

They will be leaving from Tisch at 12:30, so if you are going to be renting a bike come a little early. They will then be biking to the Anderson Memorial Bridge and arrive there around 1. You can then explore or watch the regatta for as long as you like. We plan on returning to Tufts at 3. This is a great way to learn how to bike in the city too!

RSVP to the event on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=299573216722993

Hope to see you there!

With Tufts Alumna at Helm, The Boston Tree Party Branches Out. Get Involved!

Friedman School students revel in the apple tree they planted on the Boston campus.

With a September article in America’s second-most-popular newspaper, the Boston Tree Party has sprung from sapling to force of nature, with its founder, Tufts alumna Lisa Gross, doing her best Johnny Appleseed.

“In the 19th century, there were about 16,000 varieties [of apples], and today, the commercial market is dominated by only about 10,” Gross told USA Today. “That represents such a loss. Not only a homogenization of flavor but of culture and experience.”

Although the Tree Party has been planting pairs of heirloom apple trees for only six months, about 50 coalitions and organizations have already combined to plant 35 pairs, said Gross, who has an MFA from Tufts and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts.

“Though we would love to plant as many trees as possible, we’re focusing on people and how to engage different and diverse communities,” Gross told the Office of Sustainability in an interview. “What we’re really interested in doing is inspiring the communities to take care of the trees and come together as a united community.”

The organization Gross planted aims to improve access to good food, fight erosion, and provide habitat for birds and bees, among other objectives.

Tufts students can link up with one of the two campus groups that have planted trees. One is a group of undergrads that set down roots on the Medford campus (if you’re coming out of the Tisch Library, the pair of trees is to the right on the hillside). The other are grad students at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy in Boston.

With its popularity growing, the Tree Party has plans to broaden its canopy over the coming months. This fall, it will add a part-time project coordinator to its skeleton staff (the application period has passed) and is working with a local filmmaker on a documentary about the Tree Party.

In December, the Tree Party will partner with the MIT Center for Civic Media, the prestigious MIT Media Lab, and a local software development group to make a smartphone app that will show the locations of the trees and information on who planted each pair.

In the Spring, the Tree Party will launch a do-it-yourself program for those who want to plant trees and will expand the range where groups can plant trees to all of Massachusetts.

Regional news outlets, including the Boston Metro and the city’s NPR affiliate, are taking notice of Gross’ effort. On Sept. 17, The Boston Globe published an editorial about the Tree Party:

“Since last spring, beginning with the planting of a pair of heirloom apple trees on the Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway, the Boston Tree Party has brought together hundreds of people – from Harvard and Tufts to Roxbury Community College, Carney Hospital, and the East Boston Neighborhood Health Center … They are expected to produce up to 15,000 free apples a year within four years.”

A tree-planting delegation in Quincy, Mass.

Gross is working on the project with a small crew of committed arborists, including Chief of Operations Maura Schorr Beaufait, who has two degrees from Tufts, a Masters of Public Health in Community Health and a Masters of Science from the Friedman School’s Agriculture, Food, and Environment program.
Gross has some advice for those who want to set down roots in advocacy and community organizing: take the first bite and go from there.

“If you have an idea, just start. Don’t worry about asking for money or permission,” she said. “You can get the support and build the logistics as the project expands.”

So far, Gross said, the workload could fill many bushel baskets, but the payoff could too.

“I’ve been really amazed by how quickly it’s grown and taken off, and I think that’s connected to a deeper change in our culture. People have more awareness and concern about how food is grown and where it comes from,” Gross said. “The larger vision is about the merging of the poetic and the pragmatic. It’s been an incredible experience.”

Check out the Tree Party’s website to donate, volunteer, or to see how to plant a pair of heirloom trees. A few falls from now, you can enjoy the fruits of your labor.

Oct 26: Green Keynesianism – A New MacroEconomic Paradigm?

WHEN: Wednesday, October 26, 2011, 12:30-1:30 p.m.

WHERE: Global Development and Environmental Institute, Tufts University, 44 Teele Avenue, 3rd Floor Conference Room, Medford Campus

In the wake of the global financial crisis, Keynesianism has had something of a revival. In practice, governments have turned to Keynesian policy measures to avert economic collapse. In the theoretical area, mainstream economists have started to give grudging attention to Keynesian perspectives previously dismissed in favor of New Classical theories. This theoretical and practical shift is taking place at the same time that environmental issues, in particular global climate change, are compelling attention to alternative development paths. Significant potential now exists for “Green Keynesianism” — combining Keynesian fiscal policies with environmental goals. Jonathan Harris, Senior Research Associate at GDAE, will discuss the possibilities and pitfalls of this new perspective.

Oct 27: Udall Scholarship information session

In 2012, the Udall Foundation expects to award 80 scholarships of up to $5000 and 50 honorable mentions of $350 to sophomore and junior level college students committed to careers related to the environment, tribal public policy, or Native American health care.

Scholarships are offered in any of three categories:

  • To students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to the environment including policy, engineering, science, education, urban planning and renewal, business, health, justice, economics, and other related fields (NOTE: students interested in the environmental category need *not* be native American or Alaska native); or
  • To Native American and Alaska Native students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to tribal public policy, including fields related to tribal sovereignty, tribal governance, tribal law, Native American education, Native American justice, natural resource management, cultural preservation and revitalization, Native American economic development, and other areas affecting Native American communities; or
  • To Native American and Alaska Native students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to Native health care, including health care administration, social work, medicine, dentistry, counseling, and research into health conditions affecting Native American communities, and other related fields.

Scholarship Benefits include:

  • Up to $5000 for tuition, room and board, or other educational expenses.
  • Four-day Udall Scholars Orientation in Tucson, Arizona to meet with other Scholars, elected officials, and other environmental and tribal leaders. All Scholars are required to attend this event in August. Travel, lodging, and meals will be provided by the Foundation.
  • Access to an active and growing alumni network of environmental, Native American health and tribal policy professionals.

Honorable Mentions receive a one-time honorarium of $350 and access to the alumni network.

There is a Tufts-sponsored session on application process next Thursday, October 27, 5:00 – 6:00 pm at the Mayer Campus Center, upper -level conference room.

Watch this video for more information or visit their website.

Green Streets Coordinator (Cambridge, MA)

Are you passionate about helping people explore and use sustainable transportation? Do you like working creatively and in collaboration with others? Would you like to help promote a positive and powerful environmental and public health initiative, and better know your city, hundreds of key players and decision-makers, employers and other citizens of all ages?

Green Streets is looking for a Cambridge Walk/Ride Day Coordinator!

The City-Wide Walk/Ride Day Coordinator develops, oversees, and orchestrates all the Walk/Ride Day involvement, relationships, and activities within the community. The Coordinator is supported by the Green Streets Initiative’s central organization, which provides the coordinator with materials, a website framework, examples, and experienced advisors. The Coordinator organizes the efforts of a network of Walk/Ride Day volunteers who plan Walk/Ride Day activities and communication in their own organizations. Internet, email, and other electronic communication are combined with in-person communication and gatherings. The Coordinator will work with the community’s ongoing environmental, health, safety, and educational programs and help focus programs to address community concerns within the Walk/Ride Day framework.

Details here.