Tufts Gets Green

Office of Sustainability's Blog

Month: December 2011 (page 1 of 4)

Emissions to decrease as Central Heating Plant switches to natural gas

On a quiet Friday last month when the campus was mostly deserted for Veterans Day, Tufts Facilities shut down the Central Heating Plant located between Dowling and East Halls to have the chimney cleaned. No, it was not to help Santa stay soot- free this Christmas – it was the final step in getting the gas turned on for the winter.

New (yellow) gas lines were installed at the Central Heating Plant this past fall

The plant began using natural gas as its main fuel on November 30 and significantly lightened Tufts’ carbon footprint in Medford. CO2 emissions in FY 2012 in the Medford campus are estimated to decrease by 8% from FY 2011 levels despite a projected increase in energy consumption by 7.8%.

According to Tufts’ Director of Facilities Technical Services Betsy Isenstein, the transition is the result of “a fortunate confluence of events”.

Unbeknownst to most people who live and work on the Tufts Medford campus, the central heating plant was forced to switch fuels in the middle of last winter from burning No. 6 to No. 2 fuel oil because of a shipment of substandard No. 6 fuel that could not be used. No. 6 fuel oil (also known “bunker C” or residual fuel oil) is the heaviest, thickest, cheapest, and – not surprisingly – the dirtiest of six available grades of fuel oil in the US.

One of two updated boilers

Shortly afterwards, a routine inspection led to the discovery of issues with two of the fuel tanks outside the central heating plant and prompted the university to move up scheduled upgrades for two boilers that were installed in the 80s. The upgraded boilers are not only more efficient, but they have the ability to burn both natural gas and No. 2 fuel oil.

With the price of natural gas at a historic low, the fuel switch made economic as well as environmental sense. National Grid installed a new gas line from Boston Avenue up to Central Heating Plant and upgraded 1,100 feet of gas main along Boston Avenue last summer in order to bring the amount of natural gas needed up the hill to supply the central heating plant.

The new yellow gas lines look very sharp next to old fuel piping which will be replaced in the near future. #2 fuel will be maintained as a backup.

Natural gas is the cleanest of fuels commonly used for residential and commercial space heating. Switching from No. 6 fuel oil to No. 2 last winter already reduced CO2 emissions by about 7%,  switching from No. 6 to natural gas reduces CO2 emissions by about 30%,  sulfur dioxide (SO2) by over 99%, nitrous oxides (NOx) by about 75% and particulate matter (PM2.5) by about 96%.[1]

In contrast, No. 6 fuel oil comes from the “bottom of the barrel”. It is the sludge that remains after removal of distillates such as gasoline so it has a higher concentration of metals than other oil. Burning No. 6 fuel oil produces darker smoke and higher CO2 emissions than other types of fuel, and “sludge-burning” boilers have been identified as contributors to increased air pollution and consequently, a higher incidence of respiratory problems.

The retrofitted system provides state-of-the-art boiler controls.

The transition has been smooth so far, according to Isenstein. Next spring, fuel storage will be replaced to better handle No. 2 fuel, which will only be used as a backup in case the gas supply fails. A third fuel tank installed in the late ‘50s will no longer be needed, so it will be removed next year and possibly replaced. The central plant heats almost every Tufts building on the hill between Professors Row and part of Boston Avenue. Three smaller plants and a number of stand alone boilers heat the rest of the Medford campus.

The fuel switch at the Central Heating Plant was a big win in terms of reducing greenhouse gas emissions through a single initiative, but given recent reports that 2010 was a record year for C02 emissions, there is still plenty of work to be done. Do your part by living sustainably and remember that all journeys begin with small steps. You can download the Green Guide to Living and Working at Tufts or visit the Office of Sustainability website to see how you can get involved in making the world a greener place.


[1] The Bottom of the Barrel: How the dirtiest heating oil pollutes our air and harms our health. M.J. Bradley & Associates LLC and the Urban Green Council for EDF, Dec 2009.

Germanwatch poster contest on “Climate Justice”

Germanwatch calls for a poster contest presenting prizes for the most origi-nal, artistically high qualitative and meaningful poster on climate justice. The three winners will be awarded a total prize money of 1800€. Closing date is the 15 February 2012.

The poster contest shall call the attention of a wider public to the subject of climate justice in the context of international cooperation. A special emphasis will be put on opportunities of action.

Possible contents could be the following topics:

-    Adaptation to the impacts of climate change in developing countries;

-    Climate protection as a contribution to global justice;

-    People responsible and people affected by climate change;

-    Climate protection as a future opportunity for developing countries;

-    International climate financing;

-    International coalitions for an ambitious climate policy.

-    Three Pillars of Climate Justice (right to survival, effort/burden sharing, opportunity sharing)

Participants:

The announcement is directed primarily at students and young professionals in performing arts. But anyone who is interested in climate and development policy can participate.

Implementation:

There are no regulations about the methodological implementation, however, the proposals should refer explicitly to climate change in the development context. As part of the poster, it is recommended to add not only a slogan, but also a brief text in German or English explaining the topic. The target format is A2 to A1.

Use of the designs:

The objective is to use the three winner posters for the education and information work of Germanwatch, for example in the run-up to the Rio +20 Summit,  The printing and distribution of at least 500 copies is planned. Submissions can be made in German or English.

Prize money:     1st place: 1.000,- €  |  2nd place: 500,- €  |  3rd place: 300,- €

Closing date:    15 February 2012

Submission with complete application form to: klima@germanwatch.org (preferably e.g. as pdf file) or alternatively by post to:

Germanwatch, keyword “Poster Contest”, Kaiserstr. 201, 53113 Bonn

By participating in the competition, the participants agree with the terms of competition.

More information can be found shortly at: http://www.germanwatch.org/zeitung/2011-4-poster.htm

Administrative Intern, Tufts Office of Sustainability

President Monaco recently announced the formation of a President’s Sustainability Council to assess the goals and aspirations for next level of campus sustainability at Tufts. The council will be made up of a small group of faculty, staff and students. In addition, there will be three working groups, consisting of experts in the field, one each for water, waste and energy.  The intern will work with Eco-Ambassadors and the Sustainability Council to set up meetings and reserve rooms, send out meeting reminders and follow-ups, take and write-up meeting minutes, organize tours and carpools, and conduct research. He or she needs to be reliable, courteous, responsive and very professional. Organization and good note-taking skills and event organizational skills are imperative. This is a great opportunity to see the inner workings of sustainability action! Two positions available, work-study or non-work-study students are welcome. 10-15 hours per week anticipated. Please send a resume and cover letter to tina.woolston@tufts.edu if you are interested in either opportunity.

Eco-Rep Semester Update!

It’s hard to believe, but the semester is finally coming to a close and with that, the Tufts Eco-Reps Program officially concludes its third semester run after returning from a three-year hiatus.

The Tufts Eco-Reps, as you probably already know, are a group of residential students who work to encourage environmentally responsible behavior in their hall-mates and peers. They accomplish this through organizing group activities and collaborative projects, and by representing the Eco-Reps Program at various on-campus and off-campus events.

The fall semester started off with a bang, as this year’s newly selected bunch of Eco-Reps completed training and immediately jumped into their new roles by implementing compost bins in their respective dorms and hosting meet-and-greet events.

As the semester rolled along, the Eco-Reps began planning and hosting eco-related events in their dorms. Josh Metersky, Eco-Rep for South Hall, hosted a Make-Your-Own-Pizza night with dough from Flatbread Pizza and organic, local ingredients. Eco-Reps Katie Segal and Mel Rubin chose to host a joint event for Hodgdon and Bush on sustainable holiday crafts, utilizing recycled and donated materials to encourage responsible consumption over the holidays.

The Eco-Reps also took a part in the Tufts Sustainability Collective’s ‘Sustainability Night in Dewick,’ by hosting an entertaining Trashion Show where students designed and modeled attire made out of trash or reused materials. The event also served as a kickoff to the new Terracycle program, an initiative for “upcycling” chip bags, granola bar wrappers, and candy wrappers and making them into really cool products like tote bags and speakers.

The Eco-Reps as a group was also able to attend the 2011 Eco-Rep Symposium at Babson College last November. Tufts Eco-Reps had an impressive showing –  giving two presentations, running an icebreaker, and participating in various roundtable discussions and breakout sessions – showcasing to other schools our program successes, as well as taking in new ideas to improve our program in the future.

The Eco-Reps have also hosted multiple Meatless Meals, with over 200 participants over the course of the semester, and on average collected over 200 gallons of compost from dorms every week! They have worked hard to revamp the Green Dorm Room Certification process and hope to encourage even more students to certify their dorms as ‘green’ in the spring.  Look out for the Eco-Reps next semester, as they plan on hosting even more exciting eco-events and programs!

Without Walls Eco Practicum (Sullivan County, NY)

Without Walls Eco Practicum is an environmental sustainability and action program for undergraduate students and recent grads, to be held in Sullivan County (upstate NY) this upcoming summer. Participants learn various farming techniques, work with over 20 partner organizations, including Gorzynski Ornery Farm, the Sullivan County Division of Planning, Catskill Mountainkeeper, and NY State Department of State. The students get the opportunity to meet experts in the field in order to engage with the most urgent regional socio-environmental issues. Undergraduate university students from all majors & departments are encouraged to consider this program, as its scope extends far beyond environmental science alone.

The next generation of environmental activists and food justice advocates has much to learn and much to offer. This program aims to activate their existing knowledge and build a bridge between current and future eco professionals.

If interested in being involved, contact:

Eugenia Manwelyan

Program Director

Without Walls Eco Practicum

(917) 710 7496

www.EcoPracticum.com

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