Tufts Gets Green

Office of Sustainability's Blog

Month: October 2012 (page 1 of 5)

Campus Sustainability Council Fall 2012 Update

During the summer, the Tufts Sustainability Council’s various working groups met to discuss goals for Tufts in the areas of water, waste and energy/emissions reductions.

The Water Working Group envisioned Tufts having an integrated water management approach that reduces consumption, promotes reuse, and minimizes impacts on the environment enabling Tufts to become a leader in campus water management in higher education.

To reach this goal, the Water Working Group recommends that Tufts meets and exceeds federal, state and local regulations regarding runoff, sanitation, and sewer systems; implements LEED standards for water use and quality; and ensures that Tufts students, faculty, and staff are knowledgeable of how their actions impact water use and quality and know how to mitigate negative impacts on their watersheds.

The Waste Working Group’s primary goal as discussed during their Summer meetings is an overall reduction of waste at Tufts by 3% a year through source reduction, improved waste management strategies, and a general culture change on campus with regards to waste.

Part of the Waste Working Group’s proposed strategies involves improved purchasing practices to ensure that an increased percentage of environmentally responsible products are purchased by the university.

The Energy and Emissions Working Group discussed ways for Tufts to demonstrate leadership in responsible climate action through energy efficiency, emissions reduction and adaptation. Under the New England Governors/Eastern Canadian Premiers Climate Change Action plan, the Energy and Emissions group is committed to seeing Tufts reduce emissions to 10% below 1990 levels by 2020 and reducing emissions to 75-85% below the 2001 levels by 2050.

To do this, the Energy and Emissions group is developing a laundry list of energy efficiency measures and is committed to supporting a transition away from fossil fuels and teaching the Tufts community about the importance of energy efficiency, reduced energy consumption, and reduced emissions.

The groups stressed a need for reporting, feedback, and community outreach to ensure that all of Tufts sustainability efforts and goals can be reached.

Over the remainder of the semester, the Water, Waste, and Energy/Emissions groups will be meeting to discuss progress towards these goals, ongoing sustainability efforts, and additional strategies the university could use to meet their goals. A draft report will be available on February 1st, 2013 for comments. The comment period will end on March 1st and a final report will be prepared for the end of the academic year.

- by Robert R. Lynch, Campus Sustainability Council Administrative Intern

MIT Climate Co-Lab Fellows (Cambridge, MA)

The Climate CoLab, a project of the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence, seeks to apply the approach used in systems like open source software and Wikipedia to develop and gain support for creative new ideas to address climate change. The Climate Co Lab is currently seeking Fellows with interest in areas including: decarbonization of energy supply, reducing emissions in the fossil fuel supply chain, reducing emissions from energy conversion/transmission in electric power, reducing emissions from the transportation sector, industrial efficiency, social attitudes toward climate change, reducing consumption/dematerialization of the economy to reduce emissions. Fellows are expected to spend 1-2 hours per week on average over the course of the year, and are typically either postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, or others with a background in environmental science, management, or other fields related to climate change, or concerned citizens with knowledge of and interest in climate change-related issues.

Those interested in applying should contact Robert Laubacher.

Oct 27: MassBike’s Bikeable Communities Trainings

Bikeable Communities Trainings are geared towards people who want to create improvements and see changes towards safer bicycling in their communities. There are two trainings: part one focuses on the decision making process, and part two focuses on specific programs, policies, and projects. If you want to read more about the trainings click here!

On Saturday, October 27th, we are going to be hosting both part one and part two of the training here at the MassBike office. We would love if you could help spread the word, and if you are interested in coming, please RSVP. These are the last ones we have scheduled for the foreseeable future, so please come! I have attached the flyers if you are interested as well. See the details below, and I hope to hear from you soon!

When: Saturday, October 27th
Part 1: 9:00AM-12:00PM
Part 2: 1:00PM-4:00PM
Where: MassBike Office, 171 Milk St. Suite 33, Boston, MA 02109
Cost: FREE and open to the public!
RSVP: Please email Price@MassBike to register or call 617-542-2453

Call for Submissions: Exploring Urban Identities in De-industrialized Cities

Time of Exhibition: January-February 2013  

Submission Deadline: December 03, 2012  

Medium: Photography

New Bedford Art Museum, New Bedford, MA

As a once thriving industrial center which has struggled to regain its position in the 21st century economy, New Bedford, Massachusetts is exemplary of what the independent think tank MassINC has termed a “Gateway City.” Offering inexpensive commercial real estate, an eager workforce and an existing infrastructure, the gateway cities of Massachusetts maintain a unique potential for growth. The University of Massachusetts Dartmouth Department of Art History is inviting artists to submit photographic works in response to the theme: the changing urban identities of post-industrial mid-size American cities. Send submissions and to find out more, contact and by December 10, 2012: Attn: Professors P. Karimi and T. Stubblefield College of Visual and Performing Arts, Group VI: Room 313 University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, 285 Old Westport Road, Dartmouth, MA 02747

Permaculture Design + Regenerative Leadership Initiative (San Francisco, CA)

The regenerative leadership and permaculture design course is an incredible opportunity to gain real skills, build community, and get your hands dirty learning how to design sustainable living systems rooted in nature with permaculture design principles. Join an incredible regenerative leadership and permaculture design certification retreat in the San Francisco Bay Area, February 16-24th or April 20-28th, and go beyond sustainability towards a wildly fulfilling life and a truly regenerative culture.

Participants are taught by leading sustainability experts and learn valuable life, career, business, and community skills while earning an internationally recognized Permaculture Design Certificate. The skills offered in this course are applicable to aspects far beyond the garden – you will learn to design nature-inspired, resilient, regenerative systems – composting toilets, water-catchment system, natural green buildings, eco-villages and much more.

For more information on the program, click here. Scholarships are available — enter code SCHOLARSHIP when applying online.

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