Monthly Archives: October 2012

Campus Sustainability Council Fall 2012 Update

During the summer, the Tufts Sustainability Council’s various working groups met to discuss goals for Tufts in the areas of water, waste and energy/emissions reductions.

The Water Working Group envisioned Tufts having an integrated water management approach that reduces consumption, promotes reuse, and minimizes impacts on the environment enabling Tufts to become a leader in campus water management in higher education.

To reach this goal, the Water Working Group recommends that Tufts meets and exceeds federal, state and local regulations regarding runoff, sanitation, and sewer systems; implements LEED standards for water use and quality; and ensures that Tufts students, faculty, and staff are knowledgeable of how their actions impact water use and quality and know how to mitigate negative impacts on their watersheds.

The Waste Working Group’s primary goal as discussed during their Summer meetings is an overall reduction of waste at Tufts by 3% a year through source reduction, improved waste management strategies, and a general culture change on campus with regards to waste.

Part of the Waste Working Group’s proposed strategies involves improved purchasing practices to ensure that an increased percentage of environmentally responsible products are purchased by the university.

The Energy and Emissions Working Group discussed ways for Tufts to demonstrate leadership in responsible climate action through energy efficiency, emissions reduction and adaptation. Under the New England Governors/Eastern Canadian Premiers Climate Change Action plan, the Energy and Emissions group is committed to seeing Tufts reduce emissions to 10% below 1990 levels by 2020 and reducing emissions to 75-85% below the 2001 levels by 2050.

To do this, the Energy and Emissions group is developing a laundry list of energy efficiency measures and is committed to supporting a transition away from fossil fuels and teaching the Tufts community about the importance of energy efficiency, reduced energy consumption, and reduced emissions.

The groups stressed a need for reporting, feedback, and community outreach to ensure that all of Tufts sustainability efforts and goals can be reached.

Over the remainder of the semester, the Water, Waste, and Energy/Emissions groups will be meeting to discuss progress towards these goals, ongoing sustainability efforts, and additional strategies the university could use to meet their goals. A draft report will be available on February 1st, 2013 for comments. The comment period will end on March 1st and a final report will be prepared for the end of the academic year.

- by Robert R. Lynch, Campus Sustainability Council Administrative Intern

MIT Climate Co-Lab Fellows (Cambridge, MA)

The Climate CoLab, a project of the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence, seeks to apply the approach used in systems like open source software and Wikipedia to develop and gain support for creative new ideas to address climate change. The Climate Co Lab is currently seeking Fellows with interest in areas including: decarbonization of energy supply, reducing emissions in the fossil fuel supply chain, reducing emissions from energy conversion/transmission in electric power, reducing emissions from the transportation sector, industrial efficiency, social attitudes toward climate change, reducing consumption/dematerialization of the economy to reduce emissions. Fellows are expected to spend 1-2 hours per week on average over the course of the year, and are typically either postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, or others with a background in environmental science, management, or other fields related to climate change, or concerned citizens with knowledge of and interest in climate change-related issues.

Those interested in applying should contact Robert Laubacher.

Oct 27: MassBike’s Bikeable Communities Trainings

Bikeable Communities Trainings are geared towards people who want to create improvements and see changes towards safer bicycling in their communities. There are two trainings: part one focuses on the decision making process, and part two focuses on specific programs, policies, and projects. If you want to read more about the trainings click here!

On Saturday, October 27th, we are going to be hosting both part one and part two of the training here at the MassBike office. We would love if you could help spread the word, and if you are interested in coming, please RSVP. These are the last ones we have scheduled for the foreseeable future, so please come! I have attached the flyers if you are interested as well. See the details below, and I hope to hear from you soon!

When: Saturday, October 27th
Part 1: 9:00AM-12:00PM
Part 2: 1:00PM-4:00PM
Where: MassBike Office, 171 Milk St. Suite 33, Boston, MA 02109
Cost: FREE and open to the public!
RSVP: Please email Price@MassBike to register or call 617-542-2453

Call for Submissions: Exploring Urban Identities in De-industrialized Cities

Time of Exhibition: January-February 2013  

Submission Deadline: December 03, 2012  

Medium: Photography

New Bedford Art Museum, New Bedford, MA

As a once thriving industrial center which has struggled to regain its position in the 21st century economy, New Bedford, Massachusetts is exemplary of what the independent think tank MassINC has termed a “Gateway City.” Offering inexpensive commercial real estate, an eager workforce and an existing infrastructure, the gateway cities of Massachusetts maintain a unique potential for growth. The University of Massachusetts Dartmouth Department of Art History is inviting artists to submit photographic works in response to the theme: the changing urban identities of post-industrial mid-size American cities. Send submissions and to find out more, contact and by December 10, 2012: Attn: Professors P. Karimi and T. Stubblefield College of Visual and Performing Arts, Group VI: Room 313 University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, 285 Old Westport Road, Dartmouth, MA 02747

Permaculture Design + Regenerative Leadership Initiative (San Francisco, CA)

The regenerative leadership and permaculture design course is an incredible opportunity to gain real skills, build community, and get your hands dirty learning how to design sustainable living systems rooted in nature with permaculture design principles. Join an incredible regenerative leadership and permaculture design certification retreat in the San Francisco Bay Area, February 16-24th or April 20-28th, and go beyond sustainability towards a wildly fulfilling life and a truly regenerative culture.

Participants are taught by leading sustainability experts and learn valuable life, career, business, and community skills while earning an internationally recognized Permaculture Design Certificate. The skills offered in this course are applicable to aspects far beyond the garden – you will learn to design nature-inspired, resilient, regenerative systems – composting toilets, water-catchment system, natural green buildings, eco-villages and much more.

For more information on the program, click here. Scholarships are available — enter code SCHOLARSHIP when applying online.

Tips for Zero-Waste Week

It’s easy to do the Zero Waste Challenge when you are at a place like Tufts, where recycling bins abound and compost drops are available on campus. Still, here are some good tips to keep in mind:

  • Snack on fresh fruit – it’s healthier AND it’s compostable.
  • Carry a small tupperware to put food to compost later.
  • Bring your lunch and use the container to get takeout for dinner.
  • Get your drinks without a straw.
  • Avoid individually wrapped tea or drink loose leaf tea.
  • Always bring a reusable mug or water bottle.

    Photo courtesy of Tufts Dining

    • Save 20 cents at Mugar Cafe, Tower Cafe, Brown & Brew, Hodgdon Good-to-Go & Commons Deli if you bring your own mug.
    • The Tufts “Choose to Reuse” clear water bottle will get you a discount on any fountain beverage at Mugar Cafe, Hodgdon Good-to-Go, Commons Deli, and Tower Cafe. Water and sparkling water will also be discounted at Hotung Cafe.

A few things to remember:

  • Aluminum foil and yogurt cups are recyclable.
  • All napkins are compostable.
  • Any rigid plastic can be recycled – including coffee stirrers. (It doesn’t have to fit through the openings of the recycling bin, by the way – just lift the cover.)
  • Energy bar wrappers and chip bags are recyclable. Tufts has Terracycle brigades on campus.

For more information on recycling and composting at Tufts, visit the TuftsRecycles! website.

Good luck and have fun!

Internship – Kalu Yala (Panama)

Kalu Yala is a sustainable community that will be built in the mountains about 45 minutes outside Panama City, Panama. The Kalu Yala Internship Program is an exciting opportunity for students and young professionals who are looking to gain work experience and broaden their cultural outlook. Our interns create projects that are tailored to their individual interest, yet are fundamentally involved in the shaping of the Kalu Yala community.  We are currently offering internships in the following programs:

  • Business Development in Panama City
  • Digital Development in Panama City
  • Community Outreach in San Miguel
  • English as a Second Language in San Miguel
  • Outdoor Recreation in the Valley
  • Living Systems (Agriculture, Animal Science, and Biology) in the Valley

Kalu Yala is looking for passionate, self-starting individuals who wish to help inspire and continue the progress of our work. We are seeking individuals from all backgrounds who will be able to flourish in a whole-systems, entrepreneurial research environment. Upcoming semester dates: Spring Internship: January 14th- April 12th, Summer Internship: May 20th- August 2nd.

Students can apply online by filling in the application form here or email internships@kaluyala.com for more information.

Think Outside the Bottle: Student Leader

Corporate Accountability International is a membership organization that protects people by waging and winning campaigns challenging irresponsible and dangerous corporate actions around the world.

Think Outside the Bottle Student Leader Description: For more than six years, Corporate Accountability International’s Think Outside the Bottle campaign has been building support for our public water systems and challenging the social and environmental impacts of bottled water. Students are playing a critical role to advance this work on hundreds of college campuses by running campaigns to urge their administrations to end the sale of bottled water on campus and provide more access to tap water for students. In this skills-building remote internship program, student leaders take on a significant campaign project to advance Think Outside the Bottle by building a team of activists on their campus to eliminate bottled water while developing strong leadership, communication and organizing skills.

 

MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES:

  • Develop  and manage grassroots campaign challenging corporate control of water on campus
  • Build a team of activists on your campus to urge your administration to end the sale of bottled water
  • Organize and participate in national campaign actions

 

QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Commitment to corporate accountability and/or progressive social change
  • Leadership experience
  • Ability to build a team of activists to advance a grassroots campaign
  • Strong written and verbal communication skills
  • Good organizational skills, attention to detail, and the ability to juggle several tasks while meeting deadlines
  • Interest in working with student leaders across the country to build organizing skills and grassroots power

 

DETAILS:

Location: Your college campus with supervision from a Regional Student Organizer (experienced student activist)

Length of Internship: Full Academic Year 2012-2013

Training: Calls with remotely located Regional Student Organizer and experienced campaign staff to provide resources, support, and ongoing training on strategic grassroots organizing.

 

 

CONTACT:

If you are interested in getting involved with the Think Outside the Bottle Campaign and learning more, please contact Mackenzie Cunningham at waterintern@stopcorporateabuse.org.

Think Outside the Bottle: Regional Student Organizer Internship

Corporate Accountability International is a membership organization that protects people by waging and winning campaigns challenging irresponsible and dangerous corporate actions around the world.

Regional Student Organizer Description: For more than six years, Corporate Accountability International’s Think Outside the Bottle campaign has been building support for our public water systems and challenging the social and environmental impacts of bottled water. Students are playing a critical role to advance this work on hundreds of college campuses by running campaigns to urge their administrations to end the sale of bottled water on campus and provide more access to tap water for students. In this skills-building remote internship program, experienced student activists take on significant campaign work to advance Think Outside the Bottle by building a team of activists on their campus to eliminate bottled water while simultaneously working with other student leaders on college campuses across the country. The internship will include direct supervision from National Campaign Organizer staff remotely from Boston and skills trainings on grassroots campaign planning, strategy, tactics, student outreach and advocacy. For student leaders with campaign experience, this is a great way to support new student activists, increase your impact nationally, and hone organizing skills.

 

MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES:

  • Build a team of activists on your campus to urge your administration to end the sale of bottled water
  • Train and manage 3-5 other student leaders in your region to plan and execute Think Outside the Bottle campaigns on their campuses
  • Track progress and provide support as needed to student leaders to advance Think Outside the Bottle on their campuses
  • Organize and participate in national campaign actions
  • Recruit other student leaders to participate in national campaign actions
  • Attend student organizing conferences like Powershift with staff and other Regional Student Organizers
  • Develop and manage campaign materials to support actions

 

QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Proven leadership experience
  • Ability to build a team of activists to advance a grassroots campaign
  • Commitment to corporate accountability and/or progressive social change
  • At least one year campus campaign experience on Think Outside the Bottle or other grassroots campaign
  • Highly effective written and verbal communication skills, particularly e-mail and phone skills
  • Good organizational skills, attention to detail, professional demeanor and the ability to juggle several tasks while meeting deadlines

 

DETAILS:

Location: Your college campus with supervision from campaign headquarters in Boston, MA

Length of Internship: Full academic year

Hours: 10-15 hours/week

Compensation: This is an unpaid internship

Training: Classroom sessions and ongoing trainings will be provided by senior campaign staff

 

TO APPLY: 

Send a letter of interest, three references, and your résumé addressed to Grace Morris, National Campaign Organizer on Think Outside the Bottle at gmorris@stopcorporateabuse.org.

Clean Energy Internship (Massachusetts)

The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center on Tuesday launched an expanded 2013 paid internship program, offering fall and spring opportunities for students in addition to those offered during the summer.

The internship program connects students statewide to paid internships at clean energy companies based in Massachusetts. Gov. Deval Patrick announced the internships at an annual conference for clean energy industry professionals, which is being held this week in Boston.

The Massachusetts Clean Energy Internship Program during the past two summers has helped place more than 262 students and recent graduates from 32 public, private and community colleges and universities with more than 77 clean energy companies across the state. Thirty-eight of the interns ended up with full-time and part-time jobs, according to a press release from the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC).

The internship program will begin accepting applications for the 10-week internship sessions on Nov. 1.

MassCEC will give participating clean energy companies up to $12 an hour to pay each intern. The summer session will include full-time internships, with a cap of $4,800 per intern, and the spring and fall sessions will be part-time internships, with a cap of $2,400 per intern, according to the state.

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