Author: Aviva D. Kardener (page 1 of 5)

Social Media Intern, Safe Roads Alliance

Internship Description:

Safe Roads Alliance is looking for an intern to do social media for our small non-profit in road safety. The position would require a minimum of 30 minutes per day (M-F), posting relevant articles, research, and news stories about Distracted Driving, set up via Google Alerts. Since they have a national and international reach, they try to stay active on social media. Currently they have almost 13K followers on Twitter and want to be more engaged on Facebook. The internship will run from September/October to May, with the opportunity to continue into the future. Compensation: currently this would be an unpaid position.

Preferred Skills & Qualifications:

  • Studying or interested in Communications, Transportation, Public Safety, or Public Health.
Application Deadline: Until position is filled
To Apply: e-mail Emily Stein, President at emily@saferoadsalliance.org

 

Solid Waste Specialist, Eastern Research Group, Inc. (Boston, MA)

This position involves supporting federal and state environmental agencies with researching solid waste policy issues, including those that pertain to municipal solid waste, construction and demolition debris, and hazardous waste. The position is in ERG’s Boston office, and will start as early as October 15, 2017.

Required Skills & Qualifications:

  • One or more years of experience in municipal solid waste or relevant field of study or practice.
  • Experience researching waste management issues and initiatives, such as recycling, waste reduction, composting, lifecycle analysis, and organic waste (e.g., food waste diversion).
  • A Bachelor’s or Master’s degree in environmental science, environmental policy, or related field.
  • Excellent written and verbal communication skills and analytical skills.

Preferred Skills & Qualifications:

  • Familiarity with biogas recovery from municipal solid waste or wastewater.
  • International experience in any relevant scientific field of study or practice.

 

Application Deadline: September 13
To Apply: e-mail your cover letter, resume, and salary requirements to john.wilhelmi@erg.com.

Fall Environmental Internship Opportunities On Campus

Are you looking to gain some experience in the environmental field without leaving campus this fall? Look no further!

Apply to one of Tufts’ environmental offices in the back of Miller Hall!

Office of Sustainability
Recycling & Waste Reduction Communications Intern
Office Assistant; 8 hrs/wk; $11/hr
On-Call Recycling Worker
Laborer; .5-20 hrs/wk; $11/hr
Recycling Education and Verification Intern
Education Environmental; 6-8 hrs/wk; $11/hr
SMFA Eco-Rep
Education Environmental; 3-5 hrs/wk; $11/hr
Specialty Recycling Intern
Laborer; 6-10 hrs/wk; $11/hr
Zero-Waste Event Team Leader
Education/Administration; 6-10 hrs/wk; $12/hr
Zero-Waste Station Monitor
Laborer; 2-4 hrs/wk; $11/hr

Environmental Studies
Environmental Event Planner and Outreach Intern
Undergraduate; 2-4 hrs/wk 1-3 hrs/wk; $11/hr
Environmental Office Assistant
Work-study Undergraduate; 3-4 hrs/wk; $11/hr

Tufts Institute of the Environment
Environmental intern—Administration & Data Management
Office Assistant; 4-6 hrs/wk; $11-$13/hr
Environmental intern—Alumni & Partnership Engagement
Education Environmental; 8-10 hrs/wk; $11-$13/hr
Environmental intern—Communications & Outreach
Education Environmental; 8-10 hrs/wk; $11-$13/hr
Environmental intern—Film Club & Other Events
Education Environmental; 4-6 hrs/wk; $11-$13/hr
Environmental Intern—Graphic Design & Marketing
Education Environmenal; 1-3 hrs/wk; $11-$13/hr

4 Ways to More Sustainable Fashion

Sustainable fashion has a broad definition. It ranges from buying from and donating to second-hand clothing stores to decreasing the environmental impact of agro-chemicals in cotton production. The question is how can we be more conscious consumers and choose products that are ethically-made and environmentally-friendly?

 

  1. Shop from thrift stores and second-hand clothing stores.

Did you know it takes about 1,800 gallons of water to produce one pair of jeans? This number doesn’t even include the water used in washing the pair over its lifetime. Instead of buying new and wasting another 1,800 gallons of water, try thrifting your next pair. From Boston Garment District’s wide variety of thrifting opportunities to consignment shop chain 2nd Time Around’s high-end selections, there are so many local thrifting opportunities to check out in the Boston area!

 

  1. Sell or donate used clothes that you no longer wear.

A good way of getting rid of things you don’t want is to post on the Tufts Facebook Buy and Sell page or the Tusk Marketplace. Through these platforms, other students can purchase items second-hand from you—so you can make money while you downsize your wardrobe. You can also bring your clothes to sell at stores like Buffalo Exchange or donate to others like Goodwill. In April, check out the annual Eco-Reps clothing swap where students can donate and trade clothes for free!

 

  1. Think twice before buying more clothes.

In the age of fast fashion, we are quick to buy trendy pieces and abandon those no longer in style. Clothing sales have been skyrocketing — the fast fashion industry is expected to hit $2.1 trillion by 2025. These days, consumers buy 60% more clothes that they keep for half as long as people did just 15 years ago. Also, synthetic fibers like polyester emit 3 times more carbon dioxide than cottonduring their lifecycle. Rather than spending money on larger quantities of cheap clothes that create huge environmental impacts, consider investing in a few, long-lasting, high-quality pieces of clothing. Remember that you can find quality pieces at thrift stores without spending a fortune!

  1. Ask your favorite brands how your clothes are made.

Fashion Revolution Week calls attention to social justice in the fashion industry. This April’s Fashion Revolution Week commemorated the Rana Plaza factory collapse, where 1,138 people were killed in 2013 due to unsafe working conditions. Many people have instagrammed and tweeted at the brands that make their clothes with the hashtag #whomademyclothes, building awareness of these disconnects between fashion producers and consumers. Small actions like these can pressure clothing companies to be more conscious of, accountable for, and transparent about their sustainability efforts, treatment of workers, and production methods.

Watch the following ENVS Lunch & Learn Presentation to look at the environmental impact of clothing manufacturing and some of the cutting edge innovations from science and technology that are leading to breakthroughs in more sustainable production.

 

Reusable Plates of Boston 2017

On Tuesday, June 6th, President Monaco hosted the second of three President’s Picnic at the Boston Campus. These annual zero-waste events bring together the Tufts community to celebrate another year of hard work. The zero waste initiative at each of these picnics encourages attendees to BYOP — Bring Your Own Place-setting — which reduces waste created from disposable dishes, cutlery, and cups.

Condiments and drinks were served in bulk, rather than individual packets, to further reduce packaging waste.

Recycling interns helped sort recycling and compost at special Zero Waste Stations.

Attendees who brought their own dishes could also win special, sustainable prizes! This year, the first fifty won a reusable paper towel.

Attendees did a fantastic job helping us keep this event zero-waste. We hope everyone enjoyed the great food and company and will continue these sustainable practices into the future!

Click for recaps from the Medford President’s Picnic and the Grafton Presidents Picnic.

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