Author: Aviva D. Kardener (page 3 of 9)

Fellowship, Environment America

Fellowship, Environment America, Various Locations around the United States

Environment America is a policy and action group with one mission: to work for a greener, healthier world with clean air, clean water and clean energy.

We promote national, state and local policies that put the environment first. We’ve won policies that have resulted in more solar and wind power in 25 states, cleaner cars and power plants nationwide, and better protections for our rivers, streams, lakes and drinking water.

As a fellow, you’ll join a team of researchers, advocates, campaign staff, and communications experts, working together for the environment. You’ll work on a targeted environmental campaign on issues like renewable energy, clean water and conservation, learning the nuts and bolts of political organizing and campaign work while making a huge difference on issues you care about.

Application Deadline: February 23rd, 2018, Interviews at Tufts on February 22nd, 2018
Apply Online:  jobs.EnvironmentAmerica.org

From Ethnobotany to Energy Democracy—ENVS Lunch & Learn 2018

Content based on an Environmental Studies Lunch & Learn Talk given to professors, staff, and students at Tufts University. Every week during the academic year, the ENVS Lunch & Learn lecture series features speakers from government, industry, academia and non-profit organizations to give presentations on environmental topics. This is a great opportunity to broaden your knowledge beyond the curriculum, meet other faculty and students and network with the speakers.

Students, faculty, staff, and members of the community are welcome to attend.

This lecture series is co-sponsored by the Tufts Institute of the Environment and the Tisch College of Civic Life.


Medicinal Plants in their Environments: The chemical warfare of ethnobotany
John de la Parra, Visiting Lecturer, Tufts Experimental College
Watch video

Redistributing Power: Energy Democracy, Renewables & Community Resilience
Jennie Stephens, Dean’s Professor of Sustainability Science & Policy, Northeastern University
Watch video

This semester, the Environmental Studies Lunch & Learn series is off to a great start with an emphasis on justice and respecting the knowledge, needs, and problem solving of indigenous people, women, communities of color, and low-income communities.

The first talk of the semester, given by John de la Parra, explored the intersections of indigenous knowledge and medicine, and advancements in the biotechnology sphere that increase consistency of products through standardization and analysis. He began by centering the talk on respecting a woman’s knowledge as powerful, as he explains that in many cultures, medicine people are women who know their way around the local plants. About 80% of the world uses plants to heal themselves. Knowledge of the native plants in a given area points to understanding chemical differences between plants that impact their healing qualities and abilities based on the plants’ own “chemical warfare—reactions to pathogens, weather or drought, other plants, and herbivores.” Ethnobotany pairs the technological advances now available with this indigenous knowledge to grow a huge density of plants within the controlled environment of a bioreactor—needing fewer inputs—to produce concentrated tinctures for different illnesses. De la Parra discusses these lab experiments as a way to dramatically increase accessibility to many treatments by curating very specific and tested directions to grow and create the treatments —and possibly distribute them by drone drop-offs—to people all around the world who may be unable to afford or reach pharmaceuticals.  Ethnobotany can produce a product to be used by indigenous cultures to treat existing health problems.

In another talk, Jennie Stephens discussed the movement of Energy Democracy—a concept that connects social change with the energy system transition away from fossil fuels and toward renewable energy. The energy democracy integrates concerns about the environment, climate change, social justice, income inequality, racism, wealth, and human rights. This vision is an alternative to fossil fuel dominated systems, as the fossil fuel industry is the most profitable industry in the world and the biggest contributor to climate change. This resistance is forming as a response to growing inequalities, unequal distribution of the impacts of energy and climate change, and the political power of the fossil fuel industry. Stephens reminds us that we are within this energy transition from fossil fuels, even if we sometimes feel we are stuck without much progress. The Energy Democracy sees this transition as an opportunity to democratize and decentralize energy while intentionally advancing justice through inclusion and awareness of the implications and connections between issues of inequality, justice, climate, and energy. Stephens posits that renewable energy systems offer a possibility, but not a certainty for more democratic energy futures.

Stay tuned for more Environmental Studies Lunch & Learns highlighting the intersections of the environment, climate change, and justice.

Sustainability Fellowship, City of Somerville (Somerville, MA)

Sustainability Fellowship, Climate Action Outreach, City of Somerville, Office of Sustainability and Environment (Somerville, MA)

The City of Somerville is in the process of completing its first comprehensive climate change plan called Somerville Climate Forward, which will identify projects, programs, and policies to advance climate change resilience and to work towards carbon neutrality by 2050. Many of the programs and policies identified in Somerville Climate Forward will require public engagement and participation to be successful. The UNH Sustainability Fellow will take one or more of the recommendations from Somerville Climate Forward and develop the outreach strategy and materials to implement the chosen program. Depending on the fellow’s skills, outreach materials could include videos, informational pamphlets, posters, infographics, written communication (letters, emails, social media posts), graphics, and/or webpage content. The exact solution(s) of focus will be chosen later this spring when Somerville Climate Forward’s solutions are more developed. Examples of what the project might focus on include tree planting and maintenance guidance for private property owners, actions that homeowners or renters can take to address climate change at different price points (low to high cost actions), stormwater management best practices, or electrical vehicle adoption. The Fellow will be invited to review solutions and help decide on the focus of the project during the work plan development process.

Find the full description from the Office of Sustainability and Environment.

Application Deadline: February 14, 2018
Apply Online: on the University of New Hampshire website

 

U.S. PIRG Fellowship

U.S. PIRG Fellowship, (Washington D.C., Boston, Denver, New York City, & Portland, ME)

This is a two-year program, expressly designed to prepare future leaders with U.S. PIRG. We look for smarts, leadership experience, top-notch written and verbal skills, and an eagerness to learn. We value experience organizing, including building campus groups.

Application Deadline: Early Application Due Jan 31st
Apply Online: on the U.S. PIRG website.

January 2018 Eco-Ambassador Session #2 – Boston Health Science Campus

Session Summary:

We started off our second session by hearing from a current Eco-Ambassador, Nikki Lowe Lane, the Associate Director of Financial Aid at the School of Dental Medicine. She has been the driving force behind moving the Tufts Dental Financial Aid Office’s application process online, greatly reducing the amount of paper waste and allowing the office the opportunity to use more recycled paper.  The initiative has yielded significant cost savings in the office’s budget.

Then we discussed water, including where Tufts’ water comes from, water conservation projects at the university, and ways you can conserve water in your offices. Emma Groves from ABC-TMA joined us to talk about transportation options and resources available to Tufts employees on the Boston and Medford campuses. We reviewed ways to “green” meetings and events and looked at green event resources on the OOS website. We went over energy use and infrastructure at Tufts, as well as upcoming energy projects and ways to conserve energy in our offices. To end the day, we sorted “Eco-labels” and talked about which are reliable and unreliable and reviewed some purchasing tips and resources.

Assignments for next week:

  • Introduce yourself as an Eco-Ambassador to your officemates
  • Meet with your supervisor/Eco-Ambassador team
  • Create a draft community-based social marketing plan using this worksheet. Email to Shoshana by Friday, February 16.

Next Steps:

 

Additional Resources

Water:

Transportation:

  • Tufts’ Commuter Benefits: Visit the Commuting Benefits website for information about how you can get discounted transit passes.
  • Transportation Incentives & Regional Programs: folks on all campuses can sign up for Bay State Commute to find carpool partners and earn rewards for your “green” trips.  Employees on the Medford and Grafton campuses, can sign up for MassRIDES’ Emergency Ride HomeABC TMA provides incentives to employees on the Boston Campus, including the Guaranteed Ride Home Program.
  • Public Transportation: Visit the MBTA website for information on the rail, bus, subway, and commuter boat systems and access to helpful resources such as schedules & mapsreloading your CharlieCard online, and MBTA apps.
  • Tufts Shuttles: Find information about Tufts’ shuttles, including schedules and the live tracker, here.
  • BikingMassBike offers a wide range of bicycle safety and maintenance courses as well as extensive online resources about bike laws, local bike clubs, guides for new bikers, and much more. Learn more about bike safety from the Tufts University Police Department. View the City of Somerville Bicycle Routes map here.
  • General Transportation Info: Visit the EPA’s website for information about transportation and climate change, regulations related to greenhouse gas emissions from transportation, and how to calculate your greenhouse gas emissions.
  • For guests traveling to campus: Provide information about how to travel to your campus via public transportation.  This page (and its subpages) have some good resources and language.
  • Transportation Brochures and Maps: Visit the Office of Sustainability’s Publications Library for electronic versions of our various transportation-related handouts.

Meetings & Events:

Energy:

Purchasing:

Additional Topics of Interest:

  • The Environmental Studies program organizes weekly Lunch & Learns about environmental and sustainability topics that are open to all members of the Tufts community (free food is provided!) and they are recorded live each week to watch online – learn more and see a schedule of upcoming speakers here.
  • There are CSA farm shares that deliver directly to the Medford and Boston Health Science campuses.  This is a great way to get fresh produce delivered conveniently to Tufts.  Click here for more information.
  • Meet other Eco-Ambassadors at Tufts – click here for a list (you will be added shortly!).
  • The Office of Sustainability/TIE chore chart detailing how we split up chores like washing the hand towels and putting dishes away.

 

Contacts

Shoshana Blank

Education & Outreach Program Administrator

Shoshana.Blank@tufts.edu

(617) 627-2973

Nikki Lowe Lane

Associate Director of Financial Aid, Tufts Dental School

Eco-Ambassador

Nikki.Lowe@tufts.edu

617-636-6973

Emma Groves

TMA Manager

A Better City + Allston Brighton TMAs

egroves@abettercity.org

617.502.6254

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