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Position: Energy Campaign Coordinator (MD Sierra Club)

Position: Chapter Campaign and Policy Representative, Beyond Coal
Campaign: The Beyond Coal campaign is a nationwide grassroots effort to eliminate coal’s contribution to global warming no later than 2030 and replace the existing coal infrastructure with a clean energy economy fueled by wind, solar, and geothermal. The Beyond Coal campaign is working to stop the construction of new coal-fired power plants, retire and replace the existing fleet of coal plants, and keep the U.S. coal reserves underground and out of world markets. The Beyond Coal campaign is experiencing significant growth and is seeking passionate coal fighters to join our team. To learn more about our campaign visit: http:beyondcoal.org.
Scope:  
The Campaign and Policy Representative is responsible for the planning, coordination and implementation of the Beyond Coal campaign strategies and activities in Maryland. Collaborates with and coordinates the Campaign’s activities with the Maryland Chapter, volunteers and appropriate staffing resources. Develops strategies, implements state-level work plans, communicates priorities and benchmarks, provides leadership, promotes participation and reports on campaign effectiveness. Represents the Sierra Club to government officials, the media, business and community leaders, allies and other organizations, and the public.          
Job Activities:
The Representative plans and carries out activities for the Beyond Coal campaign. Participates in the development of a strategic campaign plan, goals and objectives for Maryland. Implements the state level aspects of a strategic campaign. Collaborates with Sierra Club’s Environmental Law Program, Chapter, Communications Department, Organizing and On-Line Organizing Capacities, Political Team, Sierra Student Coalition, Sierra Club’s programs including but not limited to Environmental Justice, Labor, Partnerships, and volunteer leadership to ensure the execution of a Maryland-based campaign to move the state off of coal to renewable energy and energy efficiency.

Energy Efficiency/Clean Energy Specialist, Environmental Defense Fund (NY)

With world attention focused on both the environment and the economy, Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) is where policymakers and business leaders turn for win-win solutions. This leading green group, with programs from Boston to Beijing, has tripled in size over the past decade by focusing on strong science, uncommon partnerships and market-based approaches. You can be part of a vibrant workplace that welcomes diverse perspectives, talents and contributions, where innovation and a focus on results are a way of life. Learn more.

Summer Energy Intern, Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) (Boston)

The Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) seeks an energy intern to work in its Boston office starting in Summer, 2014. MAPC is the regional planning agency serving the people who live and work in Metropolitan Boston. Learn more.

Enter the Sustainable Campus Int’l Competition!

The second edition of the Sustainable Campus International Competition (SCIC) is open for free registration online. This is an opportunity for students worldwide to transform their academic learning into real world actions and impacts. They are invited to design and apply a tool, system or practise that addresses sustainability issues relevant to their campus.
SCIC is designed as an 18-month competition. Students are asked to develop a sustainability project they can implement within their campuses and communities within one academic year. The strongest projects will forecast tangible impacts by the end of the academic year, though the projects may and are encouraged to continue in the future. The student teams will be judged for their ability to improve sustainability impacts
based on specific metrics, the strength of their engagement strategy with stakeholders and the overall quality of the project presented.
The SCIC 2014 international jury panel will be presided by the CEO of the Environmental Association for Universities and Colleges (EAUC) Iain Patton, and he declares that: “Revolution is in the air and the SCIC is at the heart of the new student-driven and staff-supported sustainability mandate that is empowering students to unleash their transformative potential”.
Students will receive online support and mentorship throughout the development of their project. The top three finalist teams will participate in an online final presentation and judging session. The SCIC will award $CAN 3,000 to the team that is selected by the judges as the strongest project. All teams are encouraged to implement their projects and submit a project assessment by July 2015 for a chance to gain further recognition.

Part 3 of Unwrapping Building 574 is Available!

Part 3 of Unwrapping Building 574 is now available! Part 3, entitled Adaptation, talks about the difficulties and nuances of adapting such an old, historic building into a modern, sustainable office. The section also includes some pictures of the building and concludes our series. We hope you’ve enjoyed it!

Read the blog here!

Unwrapping Building 574- Part 3: Adaptation

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Not even the interior and exterior details were ignored on the 574 project. The appliances and plumbing will feature energy and water efficient features, and the exterior will feature colored metal paneling for a contemporary look. Carpet, concrete, wood, and a large quantity of supply materials will be recycled goods. All of these elements make for a unique designed, energy aware building.

When I asked about the difficulties of creating such a project, both Santangelo and Kadish were unfazed. “Certainly in such a building, you’re going to have particular issues you don’t know until you work on the building. For instance, we found a 150 by 16 foot storage tank that we had to deal with under a slab, and we don’t know where it came from.” The age of the building though, they assured, was what made the design unique. “Usually we work on the envelope, core, and exterior separately,” Santangelo said “With this building however, the projects have to blend together to address the concerns of the project and incorporate such new parts. This allows us to adapt though, and we even have the ability to include new efficiency concepts rather than go back afterwards and replace something.”

The building, which both assuredly believe will be impressive upon completion, is a great entrance marker for the Tufts campus. With its new design and features, its hopes to showcase the sustainable initiative inherent in the university, and play a new role in the campus’ prestigious legacy.

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The Oxford Princeton Programme’s Future Energy Business Leaders of the 21st Century Scholarship

The Oxford Princeton Programme Scholarship was established to provide two students looking to pursue careers in the energy business with the opportunity to participate in an industry-specific 2-3 day training course geared towards practicing professionals and delivered by highly regarded, practicing industry experts.  Travel and accommodations will be arranged and covered by The Oxford Princeton Programme. In addition to the two main scholarship winners, The Oxford Princeton Programme will also award five runners up with 10 free web-based training courses (value USD$1,950).

See the attached document for more information: scholarshipfactsheet

UNH Sustainability Institute Climate Fellowship

DEADLINE: March 24, 2014

In 2008, Clean Air-Cool Planet created the Climate Fellows program to address a recurring program: even best-intentioned partners—whether in the community, campus or corporate sector—could easily be thwarted in their sustainability goals by a lack of “person-power” necessary to conduct inventories, research and write climate action plans, or carry out other high priority climate-related rojects. Lacking any better option, many opted to assign these tasks to a busy voluntee, or a staff person already working at full capacity—and, all too often, that meant a loss of momentum or even abandonment of a climate project.

In 2014, the Sustainability Institute at UNH became the new home of the Climate Fellows program. The program matches exceptional college students from diverse backgrounds with high priority climate solutions projects. Through this nationally advertised and highly competitive program, students receive skills training, mentoring, networking opportunities, and a stipend for full-time summer projects undertaken with a wide range of partner organizations.

Learn more.

Part 2 of “Unwrapping Building 574″ is Here!

Our ongoing coverage of building 574 continues with Part 2- Stormwater. The interview details some fascinating mechanics of the building design, including how water and runoff is handled. Read it here!

Unwrapping Building 574, Part 2: Stormwater

I asked Ray Santangelo and David Kadish if stormwater drainage was a factor in the design of building 574. “It was actually required,” Kadish said. “The age of the building resulted in a system that sent the storm water to the sewer lines, which is no longer allowed by the city’s code. This resulted in the installation of filtration tanks to mitigate the amount of water being sent to the city’s infrastructure.” Stormwater infiltration systems are used to collect, treat, and recharge stormwater runoff generated from impervious areas of developments, such as roofs, sidewalks, and parking lots.  They improve stormwater runoff quality and quantity and help to recharge underground aquifer water supplies, reduce the total volume and peak rate of runoff discharged from a site, and reduce the amount of water directed to City stormwater collection systems.IMG_3645

The conversation also included stormwater recharge systems. Kadish explained these in great detail. “For the 574 Boston Avenue project, there are a few different types of stormwater recharge systems, including pervious pavers, a drywell, and two pipe and stone systems. Pervious pavers allow runoff to infiltrate by providing enough space between each individual paver for water to pass into the underlying soils. A drywell is a concrete chamber with small holes in the concrete walls that drain the chamber. Pipe and stone systems are a mix of perforated pipe surrounded by crushed stone.” Crushed stone is a useful material for infiltration systems because of its high void properties. The more void space a soil has, the more stormwater it can ultimately store and infiltrate. All three types of systems use the same process, which is to collect runoff from impervious surfaces, store it within the system, and slowly let the runoff infiltrate into the underlying soil.

One of the challenges of the 574 Boston Avenue project was to reduce the total amount of runoff offsite. “The Harvard Avenue stormwater system was already overloaded and floods during large storm events,” the men explain. “The City required that we reduce the amount of runoff sent to the Harvard Street stormwater system by implementing infiltration systems to reduce runoff from the 574 site. The infiltration system on the Harvard Avenue side of the project was designed to store a 10-year storm, or 4.6-inches of rain in a 24-hour period.”

IMG_3650This also has ramifications for the building’s LEED rating system, the environmental rating that assesses the green design of a project. Stormwater Quantity ratings require that a site infiltrate at least 25% of the runoff generated by a site. Using the techniques described above, the 574 Boston Avenue project will reduce the runoff sent to the City stormwater systems by almost 60%, a true representation of the design team’s dedication to sustainability.

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