Tufts Gets Green

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Category: Energy (page 3 of 20)

Unwrapping Building 574, Part 2: Stormwater

I asked Ray Santangelo and David Kadish if stormwater drainage was a factor in the design of building 574. “It was actually required,” Kadish said. “The age of the building resulted in a system that sent the storm water to the sewer lines, which is no longer allowed by the city’s code. This resulted in the installation of filtration tanks to mitigate the amount of water being sent to the city’s infrastructure.” Stormwater infiltration systems are used to collect, treat, and recharge stormwater runoff generated from impervious areas of developments, such as roofs, sidewalks, and parking lots.  They improve stormwater runoff quality and quantity and help to recharge underground aquifer water supplies, reduce the total volume and peak rate of runoff discharged from a site, and reduce the amount of water directed to City stormwater collection systems.IMG_3645

The conversation also included stormwater recharge systems. Kadish explained these in great detail. “For the 574 Boston Avenue project, there are a few different types of stormwater recharge systems, including pervious pavers, a drywell, and two pipe and stone systems. Pervious pavers allow runoff to infiltrate by providing enough space between each individual paver for water to pass into the underlying soils. A drywell is a concrete chamber with small holes in the concrete walls that drain the chamber. Pipe and stone systems are a mix of perforated pipe surrounded by crushed stone.” Crushed stone is a useful material for infiltration systems because of its high void properties. The more void space a soil has, the more stormwater it can ultimately store and infiltrate. All three types of systems use the same process, which is to collect runoff from impervious surfaces, store it within the system, and slowly let the runoff infiltrate into the underlying soil.

One of the challenges of the 574 Boston Avenue project was to reduce the total amount of runoff offsite. “The Harvard Avenue stormwater system was already overloaded and floods during large storm events,” the men explain. “The City required that we reduce the amount of runoff sent to the Harvard Street stormwater system by implementing infiltration systems to reduce runoff from the 574 site. The infiltration system on the Harvard Avenue side of the project was designed to store a 10-year storm, or 4.6-inches of rain in a 24-hour period.”

IMG_3650This also has ramifications for the building’s LEED rating system, the environmental rating that assesses the green design of a project. Stormwater Quantity ratings require that a site infiltrate at least 25% of the runoff generated by a site. Using the techniques described above, the 574 Boston Avenue project will reduce the runoff sent to the City stormwater systems by almost 60%, a true representation of the design team’s dedication to sustainability.

Blog Update: “Unwrapping Building 574″ is Now Available!

The Office of Sustainability is proud to present Part 1 of Unwrapping Building 574, a three part blog on Tufts’ current building project.

Building 574 represents the future of sustainability on Tufts Campus, with green initiatives designed into the building. Due to the uniqueness of the site and age of the building, the project requires some unique initiative and planning to make such a concept feasible. Communications intern Timothy Grant interviewed Ray Santangelo, the project manager, and one of the building’s head architects, David Kasdish, on 574 and what it means for sustainability. Even without a background on the subject, the interview is fascinating and easy to follow. Part 1 includes the history of building and some initiatives to include sustainable design. Part 1 is Available Now!

Programmes Officer, Int’l Water Association (Mexico)

DEADLINE: March 5, 2014

The International Water Association is recruiting a full-time programs officer to be part of its programs team supporting the development, implementation and dissemination of various projects. The programs officer will support the thematic program: Water, Climate and Energy, with a particular emphasis on a new project working towards achieving carbon neutral water and wastewater utilities, as well as the wider urban water cycle. Furthermore, the incumbent will also provide support to projects and activities related to the utility member segment of IWA. To Apply: To be considered for this position, please submit your resume, cover letter and two references to: recruitment@iwahq.org before March 5th, 2014. Learn more.

Energy Coorinator/Planner, Metropolitan Area Planning Council (Boston, MA)

The regional planning agency for Metro Boston, seeks an Energy Coordinator/Energy Planner to help achieve MAPC’s local and regional clean energy goals. This is an opportunity to work in a dynamic, inter-disciplinary, and innovative environment to build a more sustainable and equitable future for metropolitan Boston. The Coordinator/Planner will work closely with other staff at MAPC, state agencies, local officials, community groups, businesses, and institutions to promote clean energy efforts in Metro Boston. Learn more.

Residential Energy Efficiency Activist (Winchester, MA)

Intern would encourage residents of Winchester MA to take energy conservation and efficiency measures. Some independent initiative expected, but guidance and partnership is to be provided by members of the local non-profit, Cool Winchester.  Possible activities to be developed include: Weekly environmental articles provided to two local newspapers, a middle and high school sustainability ideas “challenge” with prizes, environmental presentations to a variety of groups and at other events in Winchester, a town wide “call to action” to take environmental measures. It is hoped the intern might come up with additional, creative ideas. Intern will network with various environmental activists in town. Intern would meet with members and others in homes or public places in Winchester, but would otherwise work largely independently. Hours & Stipend: 10-20 hours per week, $15/hr. Dates: Beginning work first week of June, 2014. To extend through August, 2014 – or beyond if desired by both parties. Contact: Carolyn Starrett, Winchester, MA 781-729-9022. cstar10@concentric.net

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