Category: Ideas (page 1 of 22)

First International Flyingless Conference

Image from Professor Wilde’s Twitter Account @flyingless.

On Friday April 28, 2017, Professor Parke Wilde from the Friedman School—in collaboration with Tufts Professors Richard Auner in Music and Ani Patel in Psychology, graduate students Mehreen Ismail, Victoria Chase, and Ola Ozernov-Palchik, and Professor Mary Farbood from NYU, Andrea Norton from Beth Israel Deaconess, graduate students Maximilian Burkard and Nils Meyer Kahlen, and Professor Richard Parncutt in Graz, Austria—put on the first international flyingless conference called the Global Arts and Psychology Seminar (GAPS). This event was created with support from David Kahle, the Chief Information Officer; Tina Woolston, the Director of the Office of Sustainability; and Bill O’Brien, a Multimedia Specialist. With audiences in Graz, Austria; Sydney, Australia; Sheffield, England; La Plata, Argentina; and Boston, MA, USA, GAPS was quite a successful event.

So why a flyingless conference? Well, Professor Wilde explains this event as a hopeful one in the times of climate change. He continues that communities of universities must be leaders, yet contribute to climate change in traveling to conferences to share research and knowledge. This conference aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through a lifestyle change in the academic world. He believes that while some may claim these changes are impossible or will hinder economic activity, “thoughtful people will innovate new ways of living prosperously that have less impact on the environment.”

Part of the solution can come through the many ways we can find fulfillment with minimal impact on the environment. Professor Wilde encourages his audience to think of the list of things that bring joy and happiness without being resource intensive. The professor points to music, mental health, and well-being, a direct link to the topic of the conference that before may have seemed out of place. The professor makes it clear the connection the environment has to so many other fields of studies and aspects of life.

He reminds everyone involved and participating in GAPS, “here today, you are part of something important.”

View the GAPS here:

 

 

5 ways to make your Thanksgiving more sustainable

5 ways to make thanksgiving more sustainable

We’re all excited for the upcoming holiday, but let’s also be conscious of our environmental impact. According to the USDA, Americans will throw away more that 200 million pounds of edible turkey meat this Thanksgiving holiday. Here are a few ways to prevent the wasteful and tragic aftermath of Thanksgiving.

  1. Eat local and/or organic. Many Thanksgiving foods like squash, potatoes, and apples are seasonal in the U.S. during the fall and can be purchased from a local farm. Local farms reduce the miles that the food has to travel to get to your kitchen, reducing carbon dioxide emissions. Some local farms are certified organic, but you should ask the farm if they have organic practices. You can also purchase organic produce from a grocery store. Organic produce protects farm workers from harmful chemicals and is safer for humans. Most importantly though, local and organic food tastes better!
  2. Don’t waste food! Americans waste 40% of all food produced in the United States according to the NRDC. You could give out leftovers to guests, eat it as breakfast, or even compost and transform food waste to benefit your garden. “Begin with the Bin” has a great resource for composting leftover food.
  3. Use reusable plates, silverware, glasses, and napkins. This is better for the environment, and no one likes cutting turkey with a plastic knife and having gravy soak through paper plates.
  4. Eat less meat. The meat industry is the largest source of methane gas, which is a major contributor to climate change. You don’t have to be a vegetarian, but try having less meat on the plate and filling the rest of it with healthy sides like squash and green beans! You could also consider purchasing a smaller turkey.
  5. Drink tap water. Americans spend $18 billion on bottled water, which creates mountains of plastic that will stay on this earth for a long time. If you are concerned about the water quality, investing in a filter for your tap water is a wiser alternative.

3 Videos to Watch in Under 90 Seconds

We compiled a short list of the quickest, snappiest videos on our YouTube Channel. Enjoy!

we're on


1.  Meet Tony’s new friend.


 

2. Scroll through our snazzy, digitized progress report on Tumblr!


 

3.  There are no words…just watch it.


 

BONUS: Got an extra 30 seconds? Get the low-down on sustainable food initiatives at Tufts University!

Less is More…or so we’ve heard

     Why does this popular adage seem to be the linchpin of all sustainability efforts? Let’s begin by defining “sustainability”, a buzzword we all love to use but might not always know how to articulate. According to the World Commission on Environment and Development:

     Sustainable development should “meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.”

     Nowhere in this definition is “buy less” or “use less” explicitly stated, yet there seems to be a general understanding that we just might need to cut back on something if we are to sustain healthy and equitable societies.

us-climate-talksImage source

     The desire to consider how our lifestyles impact other humans, animals, and resources should spark excitement and collaboration amongst those of us eager to preserve the people’s and planet’s prosperity. Unfortunately, it’s easy to see the distressing statistics indicating an inevitable climate apocalypse and resort to crossing our fingers and hoping for the best.

     It’s true. A zero carbon footprint is virtually unattainable and arguably, not too desirable. (We’re all for a plastic-free lifestyle, but aren’t quite sure we’re ready to go shower-free juuust yet.)

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Know Tomorrow Boston (Friday, October 2nd)

When: Friday, October 2nd
Where: Ritz-Carlton Grand Ballroom, Boston, MA
Time: 2:00-6:30 PM
Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/486754288152817/

Climate change stops here. This is our planet, and our only chance. Students are a social and political force to be reckoned with when their voice is energized and heard – so let’s make some noise!

You’re invited to the first-ever “KNOW TOMORROW Day of Action”—a major national movement taking place on Friday, October 2nd that will unite thousands of college students, activists, politicians, corporations and celebrities to take action on climate change.

Throughout the Day of Action, students at more than 50 universities in America will host large-scale events on campus, ranging from concerts and performances to speakers, road races and activity fairs.

Boston students – representing 12 colleges and universities in the area – are leading the charge, gathering at the Ritz Carlton on the Boston Common for an afternoon of music and speakers. From 2pm-6pm, students from BC, BU, Tufts, Harvard, Northeastern, Wellesley, and many more, will get loud for climate action with the help of Honorary Co-Host and Massachusetts Senator, Ed Markey (who will also be speaking at the event around 5:45pm), musicians such as Outasight and Speedy Ortiz and several climate change activists and organizations.

With the support of partners like Ben and Jerry’s and Goldman Sachs to The Climate Reality Project, The Ian Somerhalder Foundation and Shepard Fairey, the Day of Action is poised to be a momentous day for climate action.

This is your call to action, and your chance to make a difference. You can help secure our tomorrow. Know tomorrow.

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