Tufts Gets Green

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Tag: Africa

(ENVS Lunch & Learn) The African elephant poaching crisis

Ms. St. Clair Knobloch will discuss the poaching crisis facing African elephants – the direct causes and the indirect circumstances that worsen it — and the potential solutions. She has been particularly focused on the fate of the now critically endangered African forest elephant, on U.S. foreign policy goals in the region the forest elephants inhabit, and on how those goals are disrupted by the ivory trade.

Nicole St. Clair Knobloch worked on climate policy, communications, and strategy for Ceres, Natural Resources Defense Council, Environmental Defense Fund, and the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions at Duke University. She is now writing full-time, pursuing interests in looking at how change is made and at how environmental challenges affect global stability. She also currently works as a speechwriter for Shirley Ann Jackson, president, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

 

Every week during the academic year, the ENVS Lunch & Learn lecture series features speakers from government, industry, academia and non-profit organizations to give presentations on environmental topics. This is a great opportunity to broaden your knowledge beyond the curriculum, meet other faculty and students and network with the speakers.

Students, faculty, staff, and visitors are welcome to attend.

Food is generously sponsored by the Tufts Institute of the Environment.

You can’t make it to the talk? No problem!

(ENVS Lunch & Learn) Using a One Health approach to respond to infectious disease outbreaks: USAID/RESPOND project in East and Central Africa

The USAID RESPOND project was part of multi-year multi-project effort to pre-empt or combat at their source, the first stages of zoonotic diseases that pose a significant threat to human health. It focused on eight countries in Africa: Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda, Ethiopia, Cameroon, Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon, areas considered “hot spots” for emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases. Dr. Amuguni will present an overview of the RESPOND project in the last 5 years and how it has strengthened training, educational programs, and support to universities, governments, and civil society using One Health approaches to improve their capacity to prepare and respond to outbreaks and emerging infectious diseases of zoonotic origin.

Dr. Amuguni trained as a veterinarian at the University of Nairobi, Kenya. She went on to earn a Masters degree in International Development with a focus on participatory development and gender from Clark University, and a PhD in Infectious Diseases from Tufts University. Dr. Amuguni has worked previously as a veterinarian, community development specialist and gender consultant in the horn of Africa mostly with pastoralist communities. Most of her work involved developing gender sensitive livestock training materials and programs for men and women at grass root level, providing training and capacity building for animal health specialists at both policy and implementation levels and using participatory rural approaches to assist communities form effective alliances, build partnerships and identify solutions to their problems. She has worked and consulted for various organizations including Food for the Hungry International, Heifer Project International, Veterinarians without Borders (VSF-B) under the umbrella of the UN-Operation Lifeline Sudan, SNV Netherlands Development Organization and AU/IBAR.

 

Every week during the academic year, the ENVS Lunch & Learn lecture series features speakers from government, industry, academia and non-profit organizations to give presentations on environmental topics. This is a great opportunity to broaden your knowledge beyond the curriculum, meet other faculty and students and network with the speakers.

Students, faculty, staff, and visitors are welcome to attend.

Food is generously sponsored by the Tufts Institute of the Environment.

You can’t make it to the talk? No problem!

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