Tag: climate (page 1 of 3)

Design and Communications Intern, Second Nature (Boston, MA)

Our mission is to proactively build a sustainable and positive global future through initiating bold commitments, scaling successful actions, and accelerating innovative solutions among leadership networks in higher education.

Second Nature offers a dynamic and creative work environment with a customized experience for each intern designed to be challenging and build desired skill sets. Interns are involved in team meetings and planning efforts. This position reports to the Communications and Education Manager.

Application Deadline: Wednesday, October 12, 2016
Apply Online

Energy and Climate Coordinator, Environmental League of Massachusetts (Boston)

The Environmental League of Massachusetts (ELM) seeks an Energy and Climate Coordinator to lead its energy and climate policy work. Position is located in ELM’s Boston office (Beacon Hill). Position is open until filled but we encourage interested applicants to apply as soon as possible.

Lead Research Technician, Boston-Area Climate Experiment (Waltham, MA)

We are seeking applicants for the position of lead research technician at the Boston-Area Climate Experiment (BACE). This is a full-time position based at the BACE site in Waltham, Massachusetts (approx. 9 miles from Boston). The successful applicant will maintain the BACE and conduct and assist with ecological research at the site. S/he will be responsible
for maintaining a well-organized research environment, maintaining and organizing lab records, equipment, and supplies, analyzing experimental data and presenting results, helping to coordinate activities of undergraduate researchers, troubleshooting problems, ensuring that safe research practices are followed in the lab and in the field, and performing other assigned duties. The technician will work occasional odd hours and weekends as dictated by field or lab work schedules, and will sometimes work outdoors in inclement weather. The technician will spend about 70% of their working hours outdoors.
The position is open immediately (pending paperwork at Purdue), with an
immediate start preferred.
Applicants should have an educational background (bachelor¹s or
preferably M.S.) that includes coursework in ecology or environmental
science. We would be particularly interested in candidates with previous
experience as a technician in plant ecology labs, experience working on
outdoor experiments that simulate climate change in natural or managed
ecosystems, experience working with large datasets, managing student
employees, and/or working in old-field ecosystems of the northeastern
United States. The initial appointment will be for a period of six
months, with a one-year extension of the position contingent upon
satisfactory performance. Further extensions will depend on performance
and future funding. Salary will be commensurate with experience. The
technician will be employed by Purdue University (an equal access/equal
opportunity university), but will be based in the Boston area, with
little or no travel to Purdue.
For more information on the experiment, see the BACE website.

Application Deadline: N/A
Potential applicants should email Jeff Dukes (jsdukes[at]purdue.edu) a statement of interest and resume (or CV) with contact information for two or more references, using the subject line “BACE technician.” Applications will be considered as they are received.

The Candidates and the Climate

While no candidate is perfect on climate change (and indeed, they all seem to be woefully inadequate), there are some differences:
Mitt Romney: despite his surprisingly good record on climate change while he was governor, Romney’s energy plan focuses almost entirely on pumping more fossil fuels into the atmosphere, a situation that would almost certainly ensure the world’s inability to reign in climate change (Rolling Stone has a pretty fierce write up of it, but you can read it yourself and see). Just one example: in his quotes about N. American energy independence, he uses a Manhattan Institute report that says, “In collaboration with Canada and Mexico, the United States could—and should—forge a broad pro-development, pro-export policy to realize the benefits of our hydrocarbon resources. Such a policy could lead to North America becoming the largest supplier of fuel to the world by 2030.” (what no-one seems to have told him, however, is that oil and gas companies that drill in N. America aren’t restricted to selling that fuel only to Canada, Mexico and the US – they’ll sell it to whomever gives the best price – as any good, non-government-run institution would do).
But anyhow, Obama’s no great climate champion these days either but at least he doesn’t blatantly ignore climate change or pledge to dig up and sell all the fossil fuels in North America. As an aside, Romney attacks Obama for ‘targeting old coal power plants’ – when, really, we wish he were targeting them, since those plants are some of the worst carbon emissions offenders.
Here is a summary of what the 2 candidates have said about energy and climate on the campaign trail.
Elizabeth Warren seems to support action on climate change – at least in words – but I doubt it’ll be a priority for her. Scott Brown, however, in June 2012 voted to ‘disapprove’ the EPAs endangerment findings on greenhouse gases and in March 2012 voted against ending tax deductions for major oil companies and extending incentives for energy efficient homes, plug-in vehicles and alternative fuels. They are considered one of 4 senate races with noticably different opinions on climate.
Jon Golnik doesn’t list ‘environment’ as an issue on his website, but under ‘energy’ he indicates he supports the Keystone XL pipeline, fracking and drilling in ANWR. OK, I guess that says it all. Climate doesn’t seem to be a priority for Niki Tsongas, but she states that she help[ed] to pass tougher fuel efficiency standards and incentives for renewable energy, so there’s hope there.
Don’t forget to vote!

CIERP’s Energy, Climate & Innovation Research Seminar Series

Mondays, 12:30-1:45 PM

September 24:
“Riding the Unicorn: The Myth of Sustainability”
Bruce J. Oreck, U.S. Ambassador to Finland and Chair, League of Green Embassies
Cabot 703, The Fletcher School

October 22:
“Public Perceptions of Wind Energy Development in Massachusetts”
Maria Petrova, Postdoctoral Fellow, CIERP, The Fletcher School
Cabot 702, The Fletcher School

November 19:
“No Great Wall – The Global Diffusion of Clean Energy Technologies”
Kelly Sims Gallagher, Associate Professor of Energy and Environmental Policy and
Director of CIERP’s Energy, Climate, and Innovation Program, The Fletcher School
Cabot 702, The Fletcher School

December 3:
“Climate Change as a Driver of Humanitarian Crises and Response”
Peter Walker, Director of the Feinstein International Center and Rosenberg
Professor of Nutrition and Human Security, Tufts University
Cabot 702, The Fletcher School

For event flyers and additional information, visit the Fletcher School’s events page here.

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