Sustainability at Tufts

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Tag: climate change (page 1 of 4)

Environmental Fellows Program, Environmental League of Massachusetts, (Boston, MA)

The Environmental League of Massachusetts is a non-profit organization located in Boston. We are committed to combating climate change and protecting our land, water, and public health. By creating diverse alliances and building the power of the environmental community, we use our collective influence to ensure Massachusetts is a leader in environmental and economic sustainability.

Application Deadline: February 22, 2016
Apply Online or contact Ellen Tomlinson etomlinson@environmentalleague.org with any questions.

Global Warming Intern, Environment America (various locations)

Environment Massachusetts
Global Warming Campus Internship

Make a difference on global warming and clean energy this fall.
Work from campus, 4-7 hours/week.

Global warming is happening and we’re seeing the effects all around us — from dangerous heat waves and droughts to last winter’s snowstorms. And scientists warn it could get much worse unless we act soon.

The good news: we have the solutions. Solar power is taking off, and we’re beginning to harvest energy from the winds off our shores.

But powerful interests, including utility companies and the fossil fuel industry, are threatening to stop clean energy in its tracks.

We’re looking for smart, hard-working students to build the people power it will take to repower Massachusetts with clean energy. Interns will work 4-7 hours per week from campus.

Learn more and apply.
 Application deadline: Friday, December 4, 2015

 

Know Tomorrow Boston (Friday, October 2nd)

When: Friday, October 2nd
Where: Ritz-Carlton Grand Ballroom, Boston, MA
Time: 2:00-6:30 PM
Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/486754288152817/

Climate change stops here. This is our planet, and our only chance. Students are a social and political force to be reckoned with when their voice is energized and heard – so let’s make some noise!

You’re invited to the first-ever “KNOW TOMORROW Day of Action”—a major national movement taking place on Friday, October 2nd that will unite thousands of college students, activists, politicians, corporations and celebrities to take action on climate change.

Throughout the Day of Action, students at more than 50 universities in America will host large-scale events on campus, ranging from concerts and performances to speakers, road races and activity fairs.

Boston students – representing 12 colleges and universities in the area – are leading the charge, gathering at the Ritz Carlton on the Boston Common for an afternoon of music and speakers. From 2pm-6pm, students from BC, BU, Tufts, Harvard, Northeastern, Wellesley, and many more, will get loud for climate action with the help of Honorary Co-Host and Massachusetts Senator, Ed Markey (who will also be speaking at the event around 5:45pm), musicians such as Outasight and Speedy Ortiz and several climate change activists and organizations.

With the support of partners like Ben and Jerry’s and Goldman Sachs to The Climate Reality Project, The Ian Somerhalder Foundation and Shepard Fairey, the Day of Action is poised to be a momentous day for climate action.

This is your call to action, and your chance to make a difference. You can help secure our tomorrow. Know tomorrow.

Global Warming Campus Internship, Environment Massachusetts

Application deadline: September 30, 2015

“Global warming is happening and we’re seeing the effects all around us — from  dangerous heat waves and droughts to last winter’s snowstorms. And scientists warn it could get much worse unless we act soon.

“The good news: we have the solutions. Solar power is taking off, and we’re beginning to harvest energy from the winds off our shores.

“But powerful interests, including utility companies and the fossil fuel industry, are threatening to stop clean energy in its tracks.

“We’re looking for smart, hard-working students to build the people power it will take to repower Massachusetts with clean energy. Interns will work 4-7 hours per week from campus.”

Learn more and apply.

Why Climate Guilt Doesn’t Help

Book:  “What We Think About When We Try Not To Think About Global Warming”

Location:  Sophia Gordon Hall Multi-Purpose Room, Tufts University, Medford, MA

Date:  April 28th, 2015, 6:30-7:30pm

At this event, Swedish author, speaker, and eco-psychologist, Per Espen Stoknes will speak to the audience about the public psychology of global warming and issues discussed in his new book, What We Think About When We Try Not To Think About Global Warming. Audience members will have the opportunity to consider an interesting angle of the global warming and climate change discussion, ask questions of the author, and purchase the book and have it signed by the author. This event is open, and Tufts University warmly welcomes to its campus members of the audience from across the Boston metropolitan area.

If Global Warming Is So Urgent, Why Is There So Little Action? / Why Climate Guilt Doesn’t Help

An event with psychologist and economist Per Espen Stoknes, featuring his new book, What We Think About When We Try Not to Think About Global Warming.

Climate scientists has failed to convince the public by over-relying on catastrophe framings and a guilt inducing, overly rational information approach. Understanding human responses to climate change is clearly getting just as important as understanding climate change itself. The ‘psychological climate paradox’ refers to the fact as the climate science gets more certain, the public in wealthy nations become less concerned!

Rich in story and examples, Stoknes reviews recent psychological research and explores emerging strategies for how to overcome this paradox. A more compassionate climate communication can now rely on approaches that employ the power of social networks, reframing, nudging, storytelling and better climate response indicators. Also, the acknowledgement of grief, helplessness and despair, as well as reconnecting with an intimate and personal experience within the air, can be a deep source of motivation for a grounded hope. Stoknes seeks to answer the fundamental questions: Is humanity up to the task? Or are we humans inescapably locked into short-termism?

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