Sustainability at Tufts

Tag: climate change (page 2 of 3)

Climate Change Adaptation Internship (Addis Ababa, Ethiopia)

Deadline to apply is Friday, December 12th.

UNDP Environment and Energy Group (EEG) is based in UNDP’s Bureau of Development Policy (BDP) and is responsible for providing leadership and technical support to delivery of the Environment and Sustainable Development pillar of UNDP’s Strategic Plan.  Its main focus is to help countries develop the capacity to fully incorporate environmental sustainability into development at national and local, but also global and regional, levels.  The principal areas of work are in environmental mainstreaming, environmental finance, adaptation to climate change, and local governance of resources, including energy.

Climate change is a priority area for the Environmental and Energy Group at UNDP.  Building on a history of climate change projects, tools, and resources, UNDP’s objective is to play a leading role in the UN’s climate change efforts and mobilize greater and more diverse resources for climate change initiatives. UNDP’s Strategic Plan identifies several outcomes which are relevant to climate change adaptation: (a) Growth and development are inclusive and sustainable, incorporating productive capacities that create employment and livelihoods for the poor and excluded (c) Countries have strengthened institutions to progressively deliver universal access to basic services (e) Countries are able to reduce the likelihood of conflict, and lower the risk of natural disasters, including from climate change.

The Green, Low Emissions Climate Resilient Development Team within UNDP/GEF manages UNDP’s activities with regard to policy and projects supported by United Nations Framework on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Environment Facility (GEF), bilateral, and other sources of funds. The LECRDS Team works to strengthen and expand UNDP’s services more broadly to systematically support adaptation to climate change.  Increasing emphasis will be placed on strategic partnerships, co-ordination, substantive collaboration and knowledge management to support policy coherence, and the further development of the adaptation programme.

In the context of the above, the UNDP-GEF/GLECRDS Team is currently interested in hosting an intern to support the team’s planned activities in 2014. The internship will take place in Addis Ababa where the UNDP-GEF/GLECRDS team supporting countries in Africa is based.


Duties and Responsibilities

Objectives of the assignment:

The intern, under the supervision of a Regional Technical Advisor on Adaptation, will support UNDP-GEF’s work on (a) integrated climate change strategies; (b) climate resilient livelihoods and (c) climate information and early warning systems as per the Scope of Work below.

Scope of Work:

The intern will:

  • Undertake research in support of programmes/projects developed by the UNDP-GEF /GLECRDS team. This includes also editing, translation, formatting work and review of documents;
  • Support GLECRDS Regional Technical Advisors with annual project reviews including compiling critical information on project results and impacts;
  • Undertake monitoring visits to projects including supporting monitoring of project results and reporting;
  • Prepare case studies for UNDP-GEF publications including global newsletters, pamphlets, and communication material;
  • Maintain existing UNDP-ALM databases up to date with information from projects including results achieved, pictures, videos, news articles;
  • Supporting the organizing of regional meetings for projects on Early Warning and National Adaptation Plans (in coordination with global and regional UNDP-GEF teams).

Duration of the assignment, duty station and conditions governing the Internship:

The internship will be for a period of 6 months, starting in January 2015.

The internship will be not be remunerated. The intern is responsible to secure and providing proof to UNDP of full coverage of living expenses as well as obtaining any necessary visas and has to provide proof of the enrolment in a health and life insurance plan.



Core Competencies:

  • Demonstrates integrity by modeling the UN’s values and ethical standards;
  • Advocates and promotes the vision, mission, and strategic goals of UN;
  • Displays cultural, gender, religion, race, nationality and age sensitivity and adaptability;
  • Treats all people fairly without favoritism.

Functional Competencies:

Knowledge Management and Learning:

  • Shares knowledge and experience and contributes to the UN practice areas;
  • Encourages office staff to share knowledge and contribute to UN practice areas;
  • Develops deep knowledge  in practice areas;
  • Demonstrates strong coaching/mentoring skills, regularly providing helpful feedback and advice to others in the office;
  • Actively works towards continuing personal learning and development in one or more practice areas, acts on learning plan and applies newly acquired skills.

Development and Operational Effectiveness:

  • Ability to elaborate and implement communications and publications strategies;
  • Demonstrated effectiveness in developing advocacy campaigns, including well-written information about UNCT, its objectives and activities;
  • Ability to effectively manage media engagements;
  • Demonstrates sound political judgment;
  • Demonstrates excellent ability to write and communicate orally with accuracy and professionalism in English;
  • Communicates sensitively and effectively across different constituencies;
  • Demonstrates strong IT skills including website management.

Management and Leadership:

  • Focuses on impact and result for the client and responds positively to feedback;
  • Consistently approaches work with energy and a positive, constructive attitude;
  • Demonstrates strong oral and written communication skills;
  • Builds strong relationships with clients and external actors;
  • Demonstrates openness to change and ability to manage complexities;
  • Strong team player.


Required Skills and Experience


  • Enrolled in a degree programme in a graduate school (second university degree or higher) at the time of application and during the internship (if a candidate is graduating before the internship period begins, they are no longer eligible) or;
  • Have completed at least four years of full-time studies at a university or equivalent institution towards the completion of a degree, if pursuing their studies in countries where higher education is not divided into undergraduate and graduate stages;
  • Not have graduated prior to the beginning of the internship.


  • Computer literate in standard software applications and GIS and Stata programming experience would be an added advantage;
  • Demonstrated keen interest in the work of the UN, and of UNDP in particular, and have a personal commitment to UNDP’s Statement of Purpose  and to the ideals of the UN Charter; and
  • Demonstrated the ability to successfully interact with individuals of different cultural backgrounds and beliefs, which include willingness to try and understand and be tolerant of differing opinions and views.


  • Proficiency in English and normally at least one additional UNDP working language (i.e., French or Spanish);
  • Fluency in Arabic, Chinese, Portuguese or Russian is an asset.

Apply Online

National Climate Seminar – Bard CEP

Join the Bard Center for Environmental Policy the first and third Wednesday of each month at noon eastern to hear climate and clean energy specialists talk about the latest climate change issues.

Climate Seminar calls are held via conference call (Call-in number: 1-712-432-3100; Conference Code: 253385) and professors can assign the half-hour calls to their students for a chance to hear top scientists, analysts, and political leaders discuss climate and clean energy solutions. Have questions for the speakers? Email them beforehand or during the call to All calls are available as podcasts, 24 hours after the event.

In case you haven’t seen it, a new World Bank study confirms that we are on track for 750 ppm by 2100– or sooner– and a 4° C hotter world. Next Wednesday, February 6, at noon eastern, NRDC’s Daniel Lashof will talk about how to address the issue, focusing in particular on “Using the Clean Air act to Sharply Reduce Carbon Pollution from Existing Power Plants”. One of Dan’s key messages is that this won’t happen without pressure from climate activists.

Other speakers this semester will include Mike Tidwell on Cutting Carbon at Power Plants, Brenda Ekwurzel on After Sandy, What Next?, Mark Reynolds on Lobbyists for Climate Action, Katharine Wilkinson on Between God and Green, Bill McKibben on Corruption, Democracy, Climate, and Manuel Pastor and James Boyce on Co-benefits and Climate Justice.

For more information, click here.

The Candidates and the Climate

While no candidate is perfect on climate change (and indeed, they all seem to be woefully inadequate), there are some differences:
Mitt Romney: despite his surprisingly good record on climate change while he was governor, Romney’s energy plan focuses almost entirely on pumping more fossil fuels into the atmosphere, a situation that would almost certainly ensure the world’s inability to reign in climate change (Rolling Stone has a pretty fierce write up of it, but you can read it yourself and see). Just one example: in his quotes about N. American energy independence, he uses a Manhattan Institute report that says, “In collaboration with Canada and Mexico, the United States could—and should—forge a broad pro-development, pro-export policy to realize the benefits of our hydrocarbon resources. Such a policy could lead to North America becoming the largest supplier of fuel to the world by 2030.” (what no-one seems to have told him, however, is that oil and gas companies that drill in N. America aren’t restricted to selling that fuel only to Canada, Mexico and the US – they’ll sell it to whomever gives the best price – as any good, non-government-run institution would do).
But anyhow, Obama’s no great climate champion these days either but at least he doesn’t blatantly ignore climate change or pledge to dig up and sell all the fossil fuels in North America. As an aside, Romney attacks Obama for ‘targeting old coal power plants’ – when, really, we wish he were targeting them, since those plants are some of the worst carbon emissions offenders.
Here is a summary of what the 2 candidates have said about energy and climate on the campaign trail.
Elizabeth Warren seems to support action on climate change – at least in words – but I doubt it’ll be a priority for her. Scott Brown, however, in June 2012 voted to ‘disapprove’ the EPAs endangerment findings on greenhouse gases and in March 2012 voted against ending tax deductions for major oil companies and extending incentives for energy efficient homes, plug-in vehicles and alternative fuels. They are considered one of 4 senate races with noticably different opinions on climate.
Jon Golnik doesn’t list ‘environment’ as an issue on his website, but under ‘energy’ he indicates he supports the Keystone XL pipeline, fracking and drilling in ANWR. OK, I guess that says it all. Climate doesn’t seem to be a priority for Niki Tsongas, but she states that she help[ed] to pass tougher fuel efficiency standards and incentives for renewable energy, so there’s hope there.
Don’t forget to vote!

Nov 15: Cool Science Art Competition (Lowell, MA)

Cool Science invites students of all ages to create and submit a visual work of art about climate change. The best 6 entries will be placed throughout Lowell’s mass transit system in 2013 and be seen by thousands of people every day! Winning students and their schools will receive $200 in gift certificates. Visit: for FAQ’s about the competition. Visit: for submission specific information. Deadline for submissions is November 15, 2012.

October 4-6: Peace and Justice Studies Annual Conference at Tufts University

The Peace and Justice Studies Association, in conjunction with the Tufts Initiative on Climate Change and Climate Justice, announces its 2012 annual conference…

“Anticipating Climate Disruption: Sustaining Justice, Greening Peace”
October 4-6, 2012
Tufts University

The Peace and Justice Studies Association (PJSA) Conference Committee invites you to attend our 2012 Annual Meeting, to be held on the campus of Tufts University, in Medford, Massachusetts (Boston metro area), from Thursday October 4 through Saturday October 6, in conjunction with the Tufts Initiative on Climate Change and Climate Justice. We will be featuring presentations from a wide range of disciplines, professions, and perspectives on the many complex issues now unfolding amidst disruptive climate change, which promises to be among the most significant social justice concerns in the 21st Century.

Our impressive list of keynote speakers and plenary session panelists includes: Christian Parenti (Tropic of Chaos: Climate Change and the New Geography of Violence), Ken Conca (Environmental Peacemaking), Betsy Hartmann (“Don’t Beat the Climate War Drums”), Ellie Perkins (“Women and Participatory Water Management”), Darlene Lombos (Community Labor United), Burt Lauderdale (Kentuckians for the Commonwealth; New Power Initiative), Wenonah Hauter (Executive Director, Food & Water Watch), Gregor Wolbring (University of Calgary; energy and water ethics), John Peck (Family Farm Defenders), Greg White (Climate Refugees or Mere Migrants: Climate-Induced Migration, Security, and Borders in a Warming World), and Julian Agyeman (Just Sustainabilities), with more to be announced soon…


Events open to students will be announced at a later time.

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