Tag: climate change (page 2 of 4)

Know Tomorrow Boston (Friday, October 2nd)

When: Friday, October 2nd
Where: Ritz-Carlton Grand Ballroom, Boston, MA
Time: 2:00-6:30 PM
Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/486754288152817/

Climate change stops here. This is our planet, and our only chance. Students are a social and political force to be reckoned with when their voice is energized and heard – so let’s make some noise!

You’re invited to the first-ever “KNOW TOMORROW Day of Action”—a major national movement taking place on Friday, October 2nd that will unite thousands of college students, activists, politicians, corporations and celebrities to take action on climate change.

Throughout the Day of Action, students at more than 50 universities in America will host large-scale events on campus, ranging from concerts and performances to speakers, road races and activity fairs.

Boston students – representing 12 colleges and universities in the area – are leading the charge, gathering at the Ritz Carlton on the Boston Common for an afternoon of music and speakers. From 2pm-6pm, students from BC, BU, Tufts, Harvard, Northeastern, Wellesley, and many more, will get loud for climate action with the help of Honorary Co-Host and Massachusetts Senator, Ed Markey (who will also be speaking at the event around 5:45pm), musicians such as Outasight and Speedy Ortiz and several climate change activists and organizations.

With the support of partners like Ben and Jerry’s and Goldman Sachs to The Climate Reality Project, The Ian Somerhalder Foundation and Shepard Fairey, the Day of Action is poised to be a momentous day for climate action.

This is your call to action, and your chance to make a difference. You can help secure our tomorrow. Know tomorrow.

Global Warming Campus Internship, Environment Massachusetts

Application deadline: September 30, 2015

“Global warming is happening and we’re seeing the effects all around us — from  dangerous heat waves and droughts to last winter’s snowstorms. And scientists warn it could get much worse unless we act soon.

“The good news: we have the solutions. Solar power is taking off, and we’re beginning to harvest energy from the winds off our shores.

“But powerful interests, including utility companies and the fossil fuel industry, are threatening to stop clean energy in its tracks.

“We’re looking for smart, hard-working students to build the people power it will take to repower Massachusetts with clean energy. Interns will work 4-7 hours per week from campus.”

Learn more and apply.

Why Climate Guilt Doesn’t Help

Book:  “What We Think About When We Try Not To Think About Global Warming”

Location:  Sophia Gordon Hall Multi-Purpose Room, Tufts University, Medford, MA

Date:  April 28th, 2015, 6:30-7:30pm

At this event, Swedish author, speaker, and eco-psychologist, Per Espen Stoknes will speak to the audience about the public psychology of global warming and issues discussed in his new book, What We Think About When We Try Not To Think About Global Warming. Audience members will have the opportunity to consider an interesting angle of the global warming and climate change discussion, ask questions of the author, and purchase the book and have it signed by the author. This event is open, and Tufts University warmly welcomes to its campus members of the audience from across the Boston metropolitan area.

If Global Warming Is So Urgent, Why Is There So Little Action? / Why Climate Guilt Doesn’t Help

An event with psychologist and economist Per Espen Stoknes, featuring his new book, What We Think About When We Try Not to Think About Global Warming.

Climate scientists has failed to convince the public by over-relying on catastrophe framings and a guilt inducing, overly rational information approach. Understanding human responses to climate change is clearly getting just as important as understanding climate change itself. The ‘psychological climate paradox’ refers to the fact as the climate science gets more certain, the public in wealthy nations become less concerned!

Rich in story and examples, Stoknes reviews recent psychological research and explores emerging strategies for how to overcome this paradox. A more compassionate climate communication can now rely on approaches that employ the power of social networks, reframing, nudging, storytelling and better climate response indicators. Also, the acknowledgement of grief, helplessness and despair, as well as reconnecting with an intimate and personal experience within the air, can be a deep source of motivation for a grounded hope. Stoknes seeks to answer the fundamental questions: Is humanity up to the task? Or are we humans inescapably locked into short-termism?

Intern, Environment America (Washington, DC)

Climate change looms as the most pressing issue of our generation. Fracking has contaminated drinking water and made people sick across the country. Our rivers, lakes, and most treasured natural areas are vulnerable to mining, drilling and other harms.

There’s no lack of solutions to solve these challenges; there’s a lack of political will. That’s why Environment America is running grassroots campaigns to bring people together to convince our leaders to stop pandering to big polluters and climate deniers, and start getting behind the solutions. We are hiring interns for the 2015 semester to work.

To win positive change for the environment, you need a smart strategy and effective tactics. But most of all, you need grit and determination – because that’s what it takes to mobilize enough public support to win.

As an Environment America intern, you’ll be working with some of our with some of our most experienced advocates and organizers on campaigns to reduce global warming pollution, create more solar and wind power, spare our parks and forests from fracking, keep our beaches, rivers and streams clean, and protect our wildlife and wild places.

You’ll help craft and implement social media campaigns, generate traditional earned media through opinion writing, recruit community leaders to join our campaigns, collect petitions and other grassroots support, and research and write fact sheets and other materials for decision makers and opinion leaders.

 And if you’re graduating this year, you should apply to Environment America’s fellowship program, a two-year crash course in environmental organizing and advocacy. Find out more and apply at http://jobs.environmentamerica.org/

APPLY NOW

(ENVS Lunch & Learn) MIT’s Climate CoLab: using collective intelligence to address climate change

Wikipedia, Linux, reCAPTCHA, FoldIt, social media — these are just a few examples of how online platforms allow large numbers of people to connect and collaborate in ways that were never possible before, producing unprecedented results in global knowledge exchange, problem-solving and mobilization. Inspired by this, the researchers at the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence wanted to know: how could the internet be leveraged to allow people to problem-solve at a massive — even global — scale? Could we harness the world’s collective intelligence to solve our most complicated issues? To test this, they launched the Climate CoLab, an online platform where a growing community of 30,000 people work together to develop solutions to challenges related to arguably humanity’s most pressing and complex problem: climate change.

Laur Fisher supports MIT’s Climate CoLab project’s 20 contests, 12,000+ members, 170+ volunteers, partnership network, and annual conference. She is also an elected civil society representative (alternate) for the United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) – North America, and run a project called The Civic Series (www.thecivicseries.com) where we arrange informal public presentations and conversation about major world and domestic issues. She has worked with public, private and non-government organizations in Sweden, New Zealand, Canada and the US and has experience in a wide range of fields, including carbon management and reporting, organizational recycling and waste management, renewable energy, green buildings and education. She also has training in group facilitation and has collaborated with The Natural Step and Sustainable Sweden eco-municipality tours. In Toronto, she managed and expanded regional professional education programs for the Canada Green Building Council. She holds a self-designed Bachelor’s degree from Tufts University which she titled, “Engaging Sustainability as an Innovative Process”.

 

Every week during the academic year, the ENVS Lunch & Learn lecture series features speakers from government, industry, academia and non-profit organizations to give presentations on environmental topics. This is a great opportunity to broaden your knowledge beyond the curriculum, meet other faculty and students and network with the speakers.

Students, faculty, staff, and visitors are welcome to attend.

Food is generously sponsored by the Tufts Institute of the Environment.

You can’t make it to the talk? No problem!

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