Tag: climate change (page 3 of 4)

National Climate Seminar – Bard CEP

Join the Bard Center for Environmental Policy the first and third Wednesday of each month at noon eastern to hear climate and clean energy specialists talk about the latest climate change issues.

Climate Seminar calls are held via conference call (Call-in number: 1-712-432-3100; Conference Code: 253385) and professors can assign the half-hour calls to their students for a chance to hear top scientists, analysts, and political leaders discuss climate and clean energy solutions. Have questions for the speakers? Email them beforehand or during the call to climate@bard.edu. All calls are available as podcasts, 24 hours after the event.

In case you haven’t seen it, a new World Bank study confirms that we are on track for 750 ppm by 2100– or sooner– and a 4° C hotter world. Next Wednesday, February 6, at noon eastern, NRDC’s Daniel Lashof will talk about how to address the issue, focusing in particular on “Using the Clean Air act to Sharply Reduce Carbon Pollution from Existing Power Plants”. One of Dan’s key messages is that this won’t happen without pressure from climate activists.

Other speakers this semester will include Mike Tidwell on Cutting Carbon at Power Plants, Brenda Ekwurzel on After Sandy, What Next?, Mark Reynolds on Lobbyists for Climate Action, Katharine Wilkinson on Between God and Green, Bill McKibben on Corruption, Democracy, Climate, and Manuel Pastor and James Boyce on Co-benefits and Climate Justice.

For more information, click here.

The Candidates and the Climate

While no candidate is perfect on climate change (and indeed, they all seem to be woefully inadequate), there are some differences:
 
PRESIDENT
Mitt Romney: despite his surprisingly good record on climate change while he was governor, Romney’s energy plan focuses almost entirely on pumping more fossil fuels into the atmosphere, a situation that would almost certainly ensure the world’s inability to reign in climate change (Rolling Stone has a pretty fierce write up of it, but you can read it yourself and see). Just one example: in his quotes about N. American energy independence, he uses a Manhattan Institute report that says, “In collaboration with Canada and Mexico, the United States could—and should—forge a broad pro-development, pro-export policy to realize the benefits of our hydrocarbon resources. Such a policy could lead to North America becoming the largest supplier of fuel to the world by 2030.” (what no-one seems to have told him, however, is that oil and gas companies that drill in N. America aren’t restricted to selling that fuel only to Canada, Mexico and the US – they’ll sell it to whomever gives the best price – as any good, non-government-run institution would do).
 
But anyhow, Obama’s no great climate champion these days either but at least he doesn’t blatantly ignore climate change or pledge to dig up and sell all the fossil fuels in North America. As an aside, Romney attacks Obama for ‘targeting old coal power plants’ – when, really, we wish he were targeting them, since those plants are some of the worst carbon emissions offenders.
 
Here is a summary of what the 2 candidates have said about energy and climate on the campaign trail.
 
US SENATE
Elizabeth Warren seems to support action on climate change – at least in words – but I doubt it’ll be a priority for her. Scott Brown, however, in June 2012 voted to ‘disapprove’ the EPAs endangerment findings on greenhouse gases and in March 2012 voted against ending tax deductions for major oil companies and extending incentives for energy efficient homes, plug-in vehicles and alternative fuels. They are considered one of 4 senate races with noticably different opinions on climate.
 
US HOUSE 
Jon Golnik doesn’t list ‘environment’ as an issue on his website, but under ‘energy’ he indicates he supports the Keystone XL pipeline, fracking and drilling in ANWR. OK, I guess that says it all. Climate doesn’t seem to be a priority for Niki Tsongas, but she states that she help[ed] to pass tougher fuel efficiency standards and incentives for renewable energy, so there’s hope there.
 
Don’t forget to vote!

Nov 15: Cool Science Art Competition (Lowell, MA)

Cool Science invites students of all ages to create and submit a visual work of art about climate change. The best 6 entries will be placed throughout Lowell’s mass transit system in 2013 and be seen by thousands of people every day! Winning students and their schools will receive $200 in gift certificates. Visit: http://www.uml.edu/Education/Coolscience/faqs.aspx for FAQ’s about the competition. Visit: http://www.uml.edu/Education/Coolscience/Submit-Your-Artwork/default.aspx for submission specific information. Deadline for submissions is November 15, 2012.

October 4-6: Peace and Justice Studies Annual Conference at Tufts University

The Peace and Justice Studies Association, in conjunction with the Tufts Initiative on Climate Change and Climate Justice, announces its 2012 annual conference…

“Anticipating Climate Disruption: Sustaining Justice, Greening Peace”
October 4-6, 2012
Tufts University

The Peace and Justice Studies Association (PJSA) Conference Committee invites you to attend our 2012 Annual Meeting, to be held on the campus of Tufts University, in Medford, Massachusetts (Boston metro area), from Thursday October 4 through Saturday October 6, in conjunction with the Tufts Initiative on Climate Change and Climate Justice. We will be featuring presentations from a wide range of disciplines, professions, and perspectives on the many complex issues now unfolding amidst disruptive climate change, which promises to be among the most significant social justice concerns in the 21st Century.

Our impressive list of keynote speakers and plenary session panelists includes: Christian Parenti (Tropic of Chaos: Climate Change and the New Geography of Violence), Ken Conca (Environmental Peacemaking), Betsy Hartmann (“Don’t Beat the Climate War Drums”), Ellie Perkins (“Women and Participatory Water Management”), Darlene Lombos (Community Labor United), Burt Lauderdale (Kentuckians for the Commonwealth; New Power Initiative), Wenonah Hauter (Executive Director, Food & Water Watch), Gregor Wolbring (University of Calgary; energy and water ethics), John Peck (Family Farm Defenders), Greg White (Climate Refugees or Mere Migrants: Climate-Induced Migration, Security, and Borders in a Warming World), and Julian Agyeman (Just Sustainabilities), with more to be announced soon…

 

Events open to students will be announced at a later time.

May 5: Climate Impacts Day, 350.org

It’s time to Connect the Dots between climate change and extreme weather.

Protest, educate, document and volunteer along with thousands of people around the world to support the communities on the front lines of the climate crisis. Start an event here!

Record-breaking heat waves in Russia, wildfires in Australia, floods in Thailand. Every time we pick up the newspaper and read about another record-breaking natural disaster, it becomes increasingly clear that climate change is not a future problem — it’s happening right now.

Connect the Dots is a project of 350.org and its partner organizations, to shine a spotlight on the connections between extreme weather and climate change. They will use those connections to issue a wake-up call for our communities, the media, and our politicians.

They’ll kick off the project with Climate Impacts Day on 5/5/12, when thousands of communities around the world come together to take action to Connect the Dots and call for urgent action to stop the climate crisis.

Who: You, your neighbors, family, friends, and the rest of climate movement.

What: Actions – rallies, presentations, art projects, and more – that help your community connect the dots between extreme weather and climate change.

Where: All over the world.

When: May 5, 2012 (and beyond)

Why: Because climate change is not a future problem. It is happening right now, and it is devastating communities around the world. The world needs a wake-up call, and there’s no time to lose.

Older posts Newer posts