Sustainability at Tufts

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Tag: environment (page 1 of 2)

Environmental Justice Manager, Coalition of Communities of Color (Portland, OR)

The Coalition of Communities of Color (CCC) seeks a new member of its team to lead its Environmental & Climate Justice Program. The program supports policies that price carbon in Oregon and provide economic and social benefit to communities of color. Specific near-term program objectives include building capacity in communities of color to advance climate solutions; reforming policy practices; shifting discourses that centralize the voices of those most impacted by environmental injustice and climate change; and strengthening relationships between environmental organizations and organizations of color. The successful candidate will be able to support the CCC’s vision of built power in communities of color to act and lead on environmental issues, and the presence of a strong social movement in Oregon for environmental and climate justice.

Application Deadline: Rolling applications

Apply by: Email  info[@]coalitioncommunitiescolor.org with a cover letter, resume, and writing sample. See here for more information.

Internship, Medford Energy & Environment Office (Medford, MA)

The Office of Energy and Environment in Medford has an opening for a summer intern position to assist the Medford Bicycle Advisory Commission develop a Bicycle Infrastructure Master Plan.  The Commission has been in existence for two years, and recently held a public workshop to provide direction for the Master Plan.  The intern would be expected to take the lead in converting the raw material from the workshop into a draft master plan, including:

  1. Review prior work done in the City related to bicycle infrastructure, including the raw material from the workshop
  2. Develop an outline of a master plan document, working with Commission members
  3. Perform field work to verify existing conditions, including photographs and measurements
  4. Develop draft recommendations based on meetings with Commission members, supplemented by independent research with respect to standards and common practices elsewhere.
  5. Prepare a draft master plan document, including  text and graphics, and respond to comments by the Commissioners.

Other potential tasks, if time allowed, would include developing a marketing and communications plan to bring about behavior change in regard to: cyclist behavior and compliance with rules of the road, pedestrian safety, and driver awareness of cyclists and pedestrians.

Responsibilities also include administrative office tasks in the City of Medford Office of Energy & Environment.  Summer interns expected to work a minimum of 20 hours a week, during City Hall’s open business hours (Mon, Tues, Thurs 8:30-4:30, Wed 8:30-7:30, Fri 8:30-12:30).

Possibility to continue on other projects in the Fall semester and could start part-time immediately. Position is unpaid during the summer with the potential to stay on as work-study during the school year. A good candidate is a self-starter who can work independently, use common sense and take initiative, and who has good writing skills.

Application Deadline: N/A

Interested students should send a cover letter and resume to Alicia Hunt, Director of Energy and Environment, City of Medford at ahunt[at]medford.org.

Public Policy Intern, Environmental League of Massachusetts (Boston, MA)

We are seeking a part-time public policy intern to assist our policy team. This is an excellent opportunity to work in a small non-profit advocacy setting and contribute to statewide environmental policymaking. The position is unpaid and requires approximately 25 hours per week, May 2015 through August 2015, with the possibility of continuing into the fall.

Graduate students and college students entering their junior or senior year are preferred. Application deadline: February 27, 2015.

APPLY ONLINE

National Climate Seminar – Bard CEP

Join the Bard Center for Environmental Policy the first and third Wednesday of each month at noon eastern to hear climate and clean energy specialists talk about the latest climate change issues.

Climate Seminar calls are held via conference call (Call-in number: 1-712-432-3100; Conference Code: 253385) and professors can assign the half-hour calls to their students for a chance to hear top scientists, analysts, and political leaders discuss climate and clean energy solutions. Have questions for the speakers? Email them beforehand or during the call to climate@bard.edu. All calls are available as podcasts, 24 hours after the event.

In case you haven’t seen it, a new World Bank study confirms that we are on track for 750 ppm by 2100– or sooner– and a 4° C hotter world. Next Wednesday, February 6, at noon eastern, NRDC’s Daniel Lashof will talk about how to address the issue, focusing in particular on “Using the Clean Air act to Sharply Reduce Carbon Pollution from Existing Power Plants”. One of Dan’s key messages is that this won’t happen without pressure from climate activists.

Other speakers this semester will include Mike Tidwell on Cutting Carbon at Power Plants, Brenda Ekwurzel on After Sandy, What Next?, Mark Reynolds on Lobbyists for Climate Action, Katharine Wilkinson on Between God and Green, Bill McKibben on Corruption, Democracy, Climate, and Manuel Pastor and James Boyce on Co-benefits and Climate Justice.

For more information, click here.

The Candidates and the Climate

While no candidate is perfect on climate change (and indeed, they all seem to be woefully inadequate), there are some differences:
 
PRESIDENT
Mitt Romney: despite his surprisingly good record on climate change while he was governor, Romney’s energy plan focuses almost entirely on pumping more fossil fuels into the atmosphere, a situation that would almost certainly ensure the world’s inability to reign in climate change (Rolling Stone has a pretty fierce write up of it, but you can read it yourself and see). Just one example: in his quotes about N. American energy independence, he uses a Manhattan Institute report that says, “In collaboration with Canada and Mexico, the United States could—and should—forge a broad pro-development, pro-export policy to realize the benefits of our hydrocarbon resources. Such a policy could lead to North America becoming the largest supplier of fuel to the world by 2030.” (what no-one seems to have told him, however, is that oil and gas companies that drill in N. America aren’t restricted to selling that fuel only to Canada, Mexico and the US – they’ll sell it to whomever gives the best price – as any good, non-government-run institution would do).
 
But anyhow, Obama’s no great climate champion these days either but at least he doesn’t blatantly ignore climate change or pledge to dig up and sell all the fossil fuels in North America. As an aside, Romney attacks Obama for ‘targeting old coal power plants’ – when, really, we wish he were targeting them, since those plants are some of the worst carbon emissions offenders.
 
Here is a summary of what the 2 candidates have said about energy and climate on the campaign trail.
 
US SENATE
Elizabeth Warren seems to support action on climate change – at least in words – but I doubt it’ll be a priority for her. Scott Brown, however, in June 2012 voted to ‘disapprove’ the EPAs endangerment findings on greenhouse gases and in March 2012 voted against ending tax deductions for major oil companies and extending incentives for energy efficient homes, plug-in vehicles and alternative fuels. They are considered one of 4 senate races with noticably different opinions on climate.
 
US HOUSE 
Jon Golnik doesn’t list ‘environment’ as an issue on his website, but under ‘energy’ he indicates he supports the Keystone XL pipeline, fracking and drilling in ANWR. OK, I guess that says it all. Climate doesn’t seem to be a priority for Niki Tsongas, but she states that she help[ed] to pass tougher fuel efficiency standards and incentives for renewable energy, so there’s hope there.
 
Don’t forget to vote!
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