Tag Archives: Environmental Studies

Visiting Assistant Professor, Environmental Studies, Stony Brook University (NY)

Applicants with an interest in,or experience with environmental justice are strongly encouraged to apply. Candidates with expertise in two or more of the following areas will be given the highest consideration: environmental and earth system science; global sustainability; resilience; risk and vulnerability; human-environment interactions; scenario analysis; sustainability policy and global politics; urban social-ecological systems; food and water use; ecological design; agricultural ecology; and  transportation. Training and supervision of teaching assistants supervising research/internships and academic advising experience. Curricular development,relevant researchexperience and publication record will also be evaluated. A record of/or potential for successful research funding.

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Lunch and Learn Recap: Elena Naumova, Environmental Indicators of Enteric Infections and Water Safety in Southern India

Elena Naumova, director of the Tufts Initiative for the Forecasting and Modeling of Infectious Diseases (InForMid) and Associate Dean for Research at the Tufts School of Engineering, spoke last week as part of the Tufts Environmental Studies and Tufts Institute of the Environment Lunch and Learn program. Her presentation on the Environmental Indicators of Enteric Infections and Water Safety in Southern India covered student research projects sponsored through a collaboration between the Tufts School of Engineering and Christian Medical College in Vellore, India.

 A mathematician by training, Naumova emphasized the importance of translating data into usable information that allows for action and policy.

Naumova began by laying out the importance of preventing waterborne diseases. Globally, there are 4 billion cases of diarrhea annually, 2.2 million of which lead to death. Of those 2.2 million, 80% of the deaths are among infants. Unsafe water is a large factor in these diseases.

Modern mathematical tools allow for an understanding of waterborne outbreaks in “temporal and spatial patterns”, Naumova said. “Practically all waterborne diseases exhibit strong seasonal patterns distinct for a specific pathogen in a given population [and] locality”, in a phenomenon known

as seasonality. An example familiar to New England residents, of course, would be the peaks of flu that occur in the winter. “Variability in seasonal characteristics can provide clues on important factors influencing disease occurrence, exposure, [and] spread.” These environmental factors, when they are within human control, could be a key to disease prevention. Climate change, however, will affect our ability to use these seasonal indicators as the patterns we have come to recognize begin to shift radically.

Naumova further presented statistics on the seasonality of cryptosporidiosis in the United States and the United Kingdom, salmonellosis in the United Status, and rotavirus in India.

She then laid out two studies conducted by some of her students, Dr. Stefan Collinet-Adler, Andrea Brown, Alexandra Kulinkina, and Negin Ashoori. Both studies examined the transmission of infectious diarrhea in 300 urban and rural households in the Vellore district of Tamil Nadu, India. The first study focused on the role of flies, which can carry pathogens such as norovirus, salmonella, and rotavirus. In the tests conducted, 72% of the flies tested positive for potential human pathogens. The second study used GIS to map ground water quality and distribution systems in Vellore.

Naumova here noted the importance of recognizing the difference between water quality and quantity: the focus of these studies was on quality, for lack of water leads to other severe problems but obviously cannot cause waterborne diseases.

Elena said she is always looking for students who are interested in going abroad and conducting research and will do whatever she can to make that possible!

Lunch and Learn Recap: Alicia Hunt

This week’s Lunch and Learn, an initiative of the Environmental Studies Department, featured Alicia Hunt, director of Energy and the Environment for the city of Medford.  Ms. Hunt spoke to a packed room of students, professors, community members, representatives of the Tufts Institute for the Environment and the Office of Sustainability, and President Monaco himself!

aliciahuntMs. Hunt began with an overview of city demographics and background. Medford was actually the fourth English settlement in North America! Today, the city is home to 56,000 residents, but it is also 1/3 green space, including The Fells.

Medford has also long been a trendsetter in environmental and sustainability innovation. Its Go Green Medford initiative has placed the city at the vanguard nationally. In 2002, Medford switched all its traffic lights over to LED – revolutionary at the time, but now the standard of efficiency. In 2004, its city hall was the first in Massachusetts to receive the Energy Star Plaque, and in 2009 Medford built the first municipal-scale wind turbine at a school in Massachusetts. “We love to be first” with everything green, said Hunt.

In fact, Medford has gotten so good at setting the standard for sustainability that when the Department of Energy launched its Better Buildings Challenge, they specifically recruited Medford to participate,  knowing the prestige and expertise which Medford would bring to the program.

Hunt was also quick to point out how helpful the state’s grants and other incentives are in driving sustainability.

Just last year, Medford developed a local energy action plan, an updated version of its 2001 climate action plan. Other recent initiatives and accomplishments include an Idle-Free Medford education outreach campaign and participation in SolarizeMass. Tufts’s planned installation of solar panels on the roof of Dowling Hall will be part of Medford’s Solarize Medford initiative. Hunt emphasized that the work that the city had done in vetting potential solar companies and determining which would work best in the community made the process and decision immeasurably easier for residents looking into solar installations.

In addition, while Medford has long had a focus on residential sustainability, Hunt said they are adding a focus on encouraging green business practices.

Of course, we were glad to hear that Hunt and her department are always looking for Tufts students and faculty to contribute to the efforts, whether through work-study, volunteering, internships, stenciling by storm drains, investigating the feasibility of a compost program, etc. Tufts is so fortunate to be situated in such a sustainable city!

Assistant Professor, Environmental Studies, Oberlin College (OH)

Deadline: Feb. 21, 2014

The Environmental Studies Program at Oberlin College invites applications for a full-time, visiting faculty position in the College of Arts and Sciences.  Appointment to this position will be for a term of one year beginning in the fall semester of 2014 and will carry the rank of Visiting Assistant Professor.

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Asst. Professor, Environmental Studies, St. Mary’s College of Maryland

St. Mary’s College of Maryland at Historic St. Mary’s City seeks a teacher-scholar to aid in steering our environmental-studies program. St. Mary’s currently has a vibrant and popular minor in environmental studies, and the successful candidate will have the opportunity to lead the expansion of this program into a major. Rank is assistant to associate level, with experience in environmental studies in the liberal-arts environment required. Candidate must have a Ph.D. Preferred fields include environmental studies or an environmentally related interdisciplinary field such as sustainability studies, but other areas will be considered with relevant experience. Teaching requirements include a core required environmental-studies class, plus intermediate or upper-level courses appropriate to the individual’s area of expertise, and supervision of senior-level St. Mary’s Projects. A successful applicant will be an outstanding teacher, committed to attracting and retaining students from underrepresented groups.

 

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Assistant Project Manager, Environmental Dashboard, Oberlin College

The Environmental Studies Program at Oberlin College invites applications for the position of Assistant Project Manager for Environmental Dashboard.  This is a one-year, full-time Administrative and Professional Staff (A&PS) position (potentially renewable based on grant support), reporting to Environmental Studies.

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Professor/Chair, Env. Sciences and Studies, Stetson University

Stetson University seeks a leader to develop its growing Environmental Science and Studies Department and to participate actively in the creation of a broadly interdisciplinary institute on the environment.

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Are you interested in working with the Environmental Studies Program on a Nutrition Project in a local public school?

Ann Greaney-Williams, the Program Coordinator for ENVS and co-chair of the Curley K-8 Health and Wellness Committee will be conducting a Nutritional Walk Through to evaluate the current nutritional environment at this bustling elementary/middle school in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts. The Health and Wellness Committee at the school will privide a survey to each participant. We are looking for environmental health-focused students interested in collecting information in the walk through. Students will be joined in this task by teachers, parents, and school administrators. There will be two time slots, which are listed in this doodle poll. Please sign up for one or both, as you are able. Additional information on the location for the meet-up will be provided to participants before November 15th. 

Associate Professor in Environmental Studies

Dickinson College invites applications for a tenure-track position in our Environmental Studies Department, commencing July 1, 2014. The successful candidate will be strongly interdisciplinary, with primary focus in the social sciences. The ideal candidate will contribute to a critical understanding of the relationship between society and environmental issues. Applications are invited from candidates with expertise in one or more of the broad array of social and behavioral sciences, including sociology, anthropology, geography, history, political science, psychology, communications, and related disciplines. Possible areas of expertise may include, but are not limited to: Climate change and energy use, sustainable food systems at a variety of scales, and resource conservation/management. Applications are encouraged from candidates with interest in integrating knowledge across academic domains, including the environmental sciences. The successful candidate will have a strong grounding in environmental studies, and will be expected to teach at all levels of the undergraduate curriculum, initiate an active research agenda, engage students in research, and build on our strong community-based and/or global programs.

 

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Mar 12: The Legacy of Love Canal: Environmental Justice and Social Change

March 12, Lecture: 12:00 pm, Eaton 206;
Film Screening: A Fierce Green Fire, 7:00 pm, Barnum 008, Medford Campus

Featuring Lois Gibbs, the Executive Director for the Center for Health, Environment and Justice (CHEJ) and Stephen Lester, the CHEJ Science Director as they talk about environmental activism and the media. Sponsored by the Center for Media Studies (CMS) and the Environmental Studies Program (ENVS). That same evening, they return to campus to screen the film A Fierce Green Fire. Visit http://www.afiercegreenfire.com for more information on the film.