Sustainability at Tufts

sustainability.tufts.edu

Tag: policy

Solar Campaign Internships (Boston, MA)

Solar Campaign Internships
Environment Massachusetts is building a clean and renewable future powered by the sun.

We could meet all of America’s energy needs by capturing just a sliver of the virtually limitless and pollution-free energy of the sun. And we’re making a lot of progress: in Massachusetts, solar energy has grown more than 100-fold since 2008.

But we’re still getting most of our electricity from dirty sources like coal and gas, and powerful fossil fuel companies threaten to stop solar in its tracks. This spring, we’re building support for a goal of 20% solar in Massachusetts by 2025. In order to persuade our governor to go big on solar energy, we’ll mobilize public support and build a powerful coalition of businesses and elected officials.

We’re also working this spring to restore Clean Water Act protections to thousands of miles of streams in Massachusetts and cut global warming pollution from America’s power plants.

What do interns with Environment Massachusetts do? You’ll educate and engage more people on the most critical environmental issues of our time. You’ll get our issues into the media, build coalitions, organize events and lobby decision-makers. Ultimately, you’ll help us build the public support it takes to win.

Becoming a solar campaign intern

If you agree that it’s time for Massachusetts to go solar, the best way to get involved is to apply to be an Environment Massachusetts intern today. We’re looking for students who care deeply about the environment and are ready to make a difference now.

As an intern:

  • You’ll push for smart solutions to environmental problems, and build the public support it takes to win.
  • You’ll work side-by-side with one of our organizers, learning the ropes.
  • And you’ll make a real difference on critical issues, while developing valuable skills and experience in one of the nation’s leading environmental nonprofits.
We’re hiring interns for the spring semester and for the summer. The sooner you apply, the better! And if you’re thinking you might want to make a career out of solving our greatest environmental problems, interning with Environment Massachusetts is one of the best ways to get started.Apply today! Visit http://bit.ly/1yGZvxo to submit your application.

Questions? Contact Ben Hellerstein: ben[at]environmentmassachusetts.org, 617-747-4368.

Forestry Officer (Rome, Italy)

Organizational Setting

The Forest Assessment, Management and Conservation Division provides services to member countries on matters relating to the
forest assessment, development, management, conservation, restoration and protection of forests, trees, water, mountains,
biodiversity, wildlife and related natural resources as well as for providing a neutral forum for the discussion of such topics. Other
topics of interest for the Division are agroforestry, urban forestry, and forests and climate change, including Reducing Emissions from
Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+).

This position is located in the Forest Assessment, Management and Conservation Division (FOM) in the Forestry Department.

Reporting Lines

The Forestry Officer reports to the Senior Forestry Officer/Team Leader, Forest Resources Management Team

Technical Focus

Planning, developing, implementing and technically supporting programmes and activities in the field of conservation and sustainable
management of wildlife, and protected area management.

Key Results

Comprehensive technical and policy expertise to support the planning, development and implementation of Departmental/Division
programmes, projects, products and services in accordance with Departmental/Division objectives and FAO Strategic Objectives

Apply Online

Campus Sustainability Council update: Waste Working Group

Since the beginning of March, the three Working Groups of the Campus Sustainability Council have been meeting to discuss the current state of energy/emissions, water, and waste policies and practices at Tufts, and to create new policy measures in these areas.

The Waste Working Group met for the first time on March 12th and reviewed its roles and responsibilities, which include collaborating to create university-wide solid waste reduction/avoidance goals, presenting goals to the main Council for feedback and approval, and creating strategies to meet the goals, including implementation planning.

The group reviewed how Tufts manages its waste as well as consumption data. They learned that causes of waste output variations are usually hard to determine but that waste increases noticeably during a strong economy and times of high consumption, and that reduced consumption and reusing materials could impact waste output considerably. The group reviewed the waste breakdown for the past several years on the Boston and Medford campuses. Finally, the group looked into strategies for waste reduction. The waste management hierarchy follows, from most preferred to least preferred:

  • Source reduction and reuse
  • Recycling/composting
  • Energy recovery
  • Treatment and disposal

In the second meeting, the Waste Working Group decided to break down into smaller sub-groups, and the third meeting was spent working within those groups. The groups, along with their objectives, are:

  • Waste Management
    • To identify gaps and weaknesses in current waste management and address gaps, and to achieve uniformity in waste management practices wherever possible
    • Group will cover practices and metrics
  • Source Reduction
    • Group will impact waste reduction and responsible choices through purchasing contracts and client interface
  • Labs and Hospitals
    • Group will focus on laboratory and hospital waste management including animal facilities
  • Marketing and Education
    • Group will raise the level of awareness for waste reduction across all Tufts communities through behavior change

The working group members are now in the process of brainstorming goals and areas of policy change within their subgroups. Once this process is complete, the sub-groups will discuss their findings and the Waste Working Group will make a report to the Sustainability Council. The working group is co-chaired by Gretchen Kaufman, Assistant Professor of Wildlife Medicine in the Department of Environmental and Population Health and Director of the Tufts Center for Conservation Medicine at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, and Dawn Quirk, Waste Reduction Program Manager in Tufts Facilities Services.

As always, Tufts community members are welcome to add their own suggestions for the working group through the easy, on-line form available on the Office of Sustainability’s website.