Sustainability at Tufts

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Tag: solar

Intern, Environment America (Washington, DC)

Climate change looms as the most pressing issue of our generation. Fracking has contaminated drinking water and made people sick across the country. Our rivers, lakes, and most treasured natural areas are vulnerable to mining, drilling and other harms.

There’s no lack of solutions to solve these challenges; there’s a lack of political will. That’s why Environment America is running grassroots campaigns to bring people together to convince our leaders to stop pandering to big polluters and climate deniers, and start getting behind the solutions. We are hiring interns for the 2015 semester to work.

To win positive change for the environment, you need a smart strategy and effective tactics. But most of all, you need grit and determination – because that’s what it takes to mobilize enough public support to win.

As an Environment America intern, you’ll be working with some of our with some of our most experienced advocates and organizers on campaigns to reduce global warming pollution, create more solar and wind power, spare our parks and forests from fracking, keep our beaches, rivers and streams clean, and protect our wildlife and wild places.

You’ll help craft and implement social media campaigns, generate traditional earned media through opinion writing, recruit community leaders to join our campaigns, collect petitions and other grassroots support, and research and write fact sheets and other materials for decision makers and opinion leaders.

 And if you’re graduating this year, you should apply to Environment America’s fellowship program, a two-year crash course in environmental organizing and advocacy. Find out more and apply at http://jobs.environmentamerica.org/

APPLY NOW

Solar Campaign Internships (Boston, MA)

Solar Campaign Internships
Environment Massachusetts is building a clean and renewable future powered by the sun.

We could meet all of America’s energy needs by capturing just a sliver of the virtually limitless and pollution-free energy of the sun. And we’re making a lot of progress: in Massachusetts, solar energy has grown more than 100-fold since 2008.

But we’re still getting most of our electricity from dirty sources like coal and gas, and powerful fossil fuel companies threaten to stop solar in its tracks. This spring, we’re building support for a goal of 20% solar in Massachusetts by 2025. In order to persuade our governor to go big on solar energy, we’ll mobilize public support and build a powerful coalition of businesses and elected officials.

We’re also working this spring to restore Clean Water Act protections to thousands of miles of streams in Massachusetts and cut global warming pollution from America’s power plants.

What do interns with Environment Massachusetts do? You’ll educate and engage more people on the most critical environmental issues of our time. You’ll get our issues into the media, build coalitions, organize events and lobby decision-makers. Ultimately, you’ll help us build the public support it takes to win.

Becoming a solar campaign intern

If you agree that it’s time for Massachusetts to go solar, the best way to get involved is to apply to be an Environment Massachusetts intern today. We’re looking for students who care deeply about the environment and are ready to make a difference now.

As an intern:

  • You’ll push for smart solutions to environmental problems, and build the public support it takes to win.
  • You’ll work side-by-side with one of our organizers, learning the ropes.
  • And you’ll make a real difference on critical issues, while developing valuable skills and experience in one of the nation’s leading environmental nonprofits.
We’re hiring interns for the spring semester and for the summer. The sooner you apply, the better! And if you’re thinking you might want to make a career out of solving our greatest environmental problems, interning with Environment Massachusetts is one of the best ways to get started.Apply today! Visit http://bit.ly/1yGZvxo to submit your application.

Questions? Contact Ben Hellerstein: ben[at]environmentmassachusetts.org, 617-747-4368.

Campus Sustainability Council update: Energy/Emissions Working Group

Since the beginning of March, the three Working Groups of the Campus Sustainability Council have been meeting bi-weekly to discuss the current state of energy/emissions, water, and waste policies and practices at Tufts, and to create new policy measures in these areas.

The Energy/Emissions Working Group met for the first time on March 15th and reviewed its roles and responsibilities, which include reviewing current energy usage and emissions, existing initiatives and goals, as well as creating recommendations for goals and implementation plans to present to the Campus Sustainability Council.

The group reviewed Tufts’ institutional commitments to energy and emissions reduction including the 1990 Talloires Declaration and Tufts Environmental Policy, the 1999 Climate Change Commitment to follow the Kyoto Protocol and reduce carbon dioxide levels to 7% below 1990 levels by 2012, and the 2003 New England Governors/Eastern Canadian Premiers Climate Change Action Plan with the goal to be 10% below 1990 levels by 2020 and 75-85% below 2001 levels by 2050. The members also learned that many energy-saving initiatives at Tufts are already underway, including:

  • Occupancy sensors in most rooms on campus
  • Daylight sensing/dimming, lighting & controls
  • Ongoing technology updates include LED lighting
  • Equipment efficiency
  • State of the art boiler controls and boiler upgrades
  • Retro-commissioning of buildings
  • Heat-recovery programs
  • Energy Star vending machines & vending misers
  • Free CFL bulb exchange
  • IT upgrades (LCD screens, laptops)
  • Solar panels on Sophia Gordon Hall, Schmaltz House, Fairmount House
  • Management- Residence Hall winter break shut-down
  • Behavior modification
  • LEED Certification
  • Fuel Switching from oil to gas
  • Renewable energy such as solar and geothermal

The working group members discussed the differences between Tufts’ campuses energy use and emissions, life-cycle costing, ways to evaluate proposed solutions and appropriate metrics for evaluation. The group is in the final stages of assessing the current state of energy and emissions at Tufts and will soon move on to metrics and goal setting. The working group is co-chaired by Ann Rappaport, Lecturer at Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and Betsy Isenstein, Director of Facilities Technical Services.

As always, Tufts community members are welcome to add their own suggestions for the working group through the easy, on-line form available on the Office of Sustainability’s website.