Tag: Tufts Institute of the Environment

Internships, Tufts Institute for the Environment (Medford)

TIE is accepting internship applications for multiple positions. Please see the brief descriptions below and use the Handshake link to apply. Applications for all three positions are due April 18th, 2019.

Environmental Intern – Communications and Outreach
TIE is seeking a graduate or undergraduate student intern to assist with communications and outreach. Duties include designing print materials, maintaining web pages, sourcing content for social media, writing blog posts, producing e-newsletters, creating images and videos, and assisting with other tasks as needed. Apply here: https://app.joinhandshake.com/jobs/2447580

Environmental Intern – Administration
TIE is seeking a graduate or undergraduate student to assist with administrative tasks for TIE’s programs. Duties include supporting the basic administrative functions of an office, such as: maintaining records and files, designing new record-keeping methods and tools, updating program participant databases, organizing event logistics, participating in program events, administering internal and external direct communications, and assisting with other tasks as needed. Apply here: https://app.joinhandshake.com/jobs/2447600

Environmental Programs Intern
TIE is seeking a graduate or undergraduate student to assist with tasks related to managing and executing TIE’s programs and initiatives. Duties will involve supporting the basic administrative functions of an office as well as assisting with program design, deployment, evaluation and marketing. Apply here: https://app.joinhandshake.com/jobs/2447551

Lunch and Learn Recap: Elena Naumova, Environmental Indicators of Enteric Infections and Water Safety in Southern India

Elena Naumova, director of the Tufts Initiative for the Forecasting and Modeling of Infectious Diseases (InForMid) and Associate Dean for Research at the Tufts School of Engineering, spoke last week as part of the Tufts Environmental Studies and Tufts Institute of the Environment Lunch and Learn program. Her presentation on the Environmental Indicators of Enteric Infections and Water Safety in Southern India covered student research projects sponsored through a collaboration between the Tufts School of Engineering and Christian Medical College in Vellore, India.

 A mathematician by training, Naumova emphasized the importance of translating data into usable information that allows for action and policy.

Naumova began by laying out the importance of preventing waterborne diseases. Globally, there are 4 billion cases of diarrhea annually, 2.2 million of which lead to death. Of those 2.2 million, 80% of the deaths are among infants. Unsafe water is a large factor in these diseases.

Modern mathematical tools allow for an understanding of waterborne outbreaks in “temporal and spatial patterns”, Naumova said. “Practically all waterborne diseases exhibit strong seasonal patterns distinct for a specific pathogen in a given population [and] locality”, in a phenomenon known

as seasonality. An example familiar to New England residents, of course, would be the peaks of flu that occur in the winter. “Variability in seasonal characteristics can provide clues on important factors influencing disease occurrence, exposure, [and] spread.” These environmental factors, when they are within human control, could be a key to disease prevention. Climate change, however, will affect our ability to use these seasonal indicators as the patterns we have come to recognize begin to shift radically.

Naumova further presented statistics on the seasonality of cryptosporidiosis in the United States and the United Kingdom, salmonellosis in the United Status, and rotavirus in India.

She then laid out two studies conducted by some of her students, Dr. Stefan Collinet-Adler, Andrea Brown, Alexandra Kulinkina, and Negin Ashoori. Both studies examined the transmission of infectious diarrhea in 300 urban and rural households in the Vellore district of Tamil Nadu, India. The first study focused on the role of flies, which can carry pathogens such as norovirus, salmonella, and rotavirus. In the tests conducted, 72% of the flies tested positive for potential human pathogens. The second study used GIS to map ground water quality and distribution systems in Vellore.

Naumova here noted the importance of recognizing the difference between water quality and quantity: the focus of these studies was on quality, for lack of water leads to other severe problems but obviously cannot cause waterborne diseases.

Elena said she is always looking for students who are interested in going abroad and conducting research and will do whatever she can to make that possible!

Contest: Undergrad Environmental Photography – $300 in prizes

The Tufts Environmental Studies Program is holding its first annual Environmental Photo Contest. It’s open to all Tufts undergrads and will include prizes for first place ($150), second place ($100), and third place ($50). CASH MONEY.

Students can submit multiple photos. All photography styles are welcome. Full rules and details are available on Facebook.

Submissions are due to the Environmental Studies Program, 210 Packard Avenue, Miller Hall-East Rear Door, Medford Campus, by Monday, Oct. 24.

Submitted prints will be exhibited in the Tufts Institute of the Environment and may be used by the Environmental Studies and TIE in their publications, websites, or for other Tufts-related purposes. Prints will also be showcased in a digital exhibition on the Environmental Studies website.

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