How to Recycle – Grafton

Grafton Campus

To learn about recycling in a particular location or recycling a particular material/item, please click on the list below.

  • What kinds of material can I recycle in these bins?
    NOT just bottles and cans! All clean glass, metal and plastic containers (number designations 1-7) can be put in the green bins. Food and drink containers must be rinsed clean or the load will be rejected.
    What items should not be put in these bins?
    No plastic wrap or plastic bags. No soiled food containers. No trash!
    What should I do with returnables?
    Clean returnables may be placed in these bins and will be handled by One Source employees. Separate collection of returnable items for rebate may be organized within your group or building for your own benefit (office party pool, local charity, Travis Fund). You will bear all responsibilities for such an activity.
    What types of paper can I recycle?
    All paper off your desk, including all colors, all weights and all envelopes; Manila folders, magazines, newspapers, phonebooks, and even envelopes with windows.
    How does the paper get from my desk to the bin?
    Many people have small baskets at their desk to sort out recycled paper. It is your responsibility to empty that basket periodically into the main collection bin in the hallway or common area. One Source is only responsible for processing the main collection bins.
    What do I do with cardboard?
    Collapse boxes and put smaller pieces in the bin. Place larger pieces against the wall next to the paper bin and they will be picked up by One Source.
    Why can’t paper ream covers go in?
    Most paper ream covers (including Great White 30% recycled) contain plastic to make them stronger. The plastic content is problematic for the recycling process and will cause rejection of the entire load.
    What happens to contaminated loads?
    Too much trash mixed in with recycling can cause the whole load of recycling to be thrown away. While this rarely happens, please be mindful to “drop waste in the right place”.
    How do I get involved in environmental issues on campus?
    Share your thoughts with a member of the Greening the Grafton Committee or volunteer to represent your section on the committee. For more information about recycling and other environmental issues on the Grafton Campus, contact Gretchen Kaufman at gretchen.kaufman@tufts.edu, or at 508-839-7918 x84913.
    The following websites are also very informative:
    Tufts Office of Sustainability
    The Tufts Institute of the Environment
  • Click here for more information on recycling in the hospital!

    ITEM

    COLLECTION LOCATION COLLECTION RESPONSIBILITY VENDOR
    Paper
    Aseptic, Juice and Milk Cartons
    Cardboard &                 Boxboard
    Envelopes
    Folders
    Hard- & Soft-Covered Books
    Magazines & Glossy Paper
    Newspaper
    Notebooks
    White & Colored Paper
    (No need to remove staples, spirals or plastic wraps)
    Regional collection stations
    One Source Individual is responsible for putting desk recycling in regional collection area
    Allied Waste of Auburn
    Cardboard
    No pizza boxes please
    Regional collection next to paper recycling bins – collapse box
    One Source
    Allied Waste of Auburn
    Plastics
    Click here for specifics on lab-plastics recycling (No plastic bags)
    Regional collection sites in every building – commingled with glass and metal
    One Source
    Allied Waste of Auburn
    Glass bottles
    (remove caps)
    Regional collection sites in every building – commingled with plastic and metal
    One Source
    Allied Waste of Auburn
    Cans and plastic returnables
    New collection sites to be determined
    Old Travis fund system currently not functioning – Students considering
    To be arranged
    Metal cans
    (must be washed)
    Regional collection sites in every building – commingled with glass and plastic
    One Source
    Allied Waste of Auburn
    Wood pallets
    Hospital loading dock Building 20
    Receiving
    J&H Trucking
    Scrap metal
    Building 18 parking lot
    Facilities
    Franks rubbish – Reused
    Construction materials (most)
    At job site
    Contractor (not formalized)
    Contractor arranges
    Fluorescent lamp glass and metal parts (Universal waste)
    2 x year scheduled collection – Bldg. 23
    Facilities and Health & Safety
    Contract arr. by Health and Safety
    Wood chip bedding bags
    LA hospital – Cardboard recycling
    One Source
    Harveys
    Carpet squares
    As needed
    Facilities
    Millikin
    Furniture/cabinets
    Good – Bldg. 23
    Junk – Bldg. 18
    Facilities & Purchasing
    Trade-in with new purchases, or Franks rubbish
    Electronic equipment
    As needed
    Purchasing
    Trade – in
    Computer parts
    (Universal waste)
    2 x year scheduled collection – Bldg. 23
    Facilities and Health & Safety
    Contract arr. by Health and Safety
    Dry cell batteries
    Collection buckets on campus
    Individual
    Medford Facilities
    Bedding and animal waste, leaves
    LA hospital dumpster
    Farm and LAH
    Composted
  • Before computers with a Tufts ID tag number can be picked up by Facilities for recycling, a “change of status” needs to be reported to the Tufts Finance Division. Please report this change of status by emailing the tag numbers to edward.fanikos@tufts.edu. The email subject line should read “Change of Status”. Most computers at Tufts no longer have tags on them. In this case, you do not need to report a change of status.
    Most Tufts computers are recycled for free; however, charges may be applied to large scale clean-outs. To schedule a recycling pick up, please fill in a “no fee” service request on the Facilities website at http://www.tufts.edu/central/facilities.
    The old computers are either reused internally or recycled domestically by Veolia Environmental Services. No computer equipment from Tufts is sent overseas.

  • Before computers with a Tufts ID tag number can be picked up by Facilities for recycling, a “change of status” needs to be reported to the Tufts Finance Division. Please report this change of status by emailing the tag numbers to edward.fanikos@tufts.edu. The email subject line should read “Change of Status”. Most computers at Tufts no longer have tags on them. In this case, you do not need to report a change of status.
    Most Tufts computers are recycled for free; however, charges may be applied to large scale clean-outs. To schedule a recycling pick up, please fill in a “no fee” service request on the Facilities website.
    The old computers are either reused internally or recycled domestically by Veolia Environmental Services. No computer equipment from Tufts is sent overseas.
  • Sorry, Tufts Facilities Department can only recycle equipment owned by the university. Luckily, there are many computer end-of-life options for students and community members.
    • Grafton Residents have curbside pick up in April and October. Contact the Sanitation Division for exact dates- 508/839-5335 ext. 180
    • Westboro Residents should bring computer equipment to the dump (keep separate from household trash). Recycling is free to residents with a valid trash disposal sticker.
    Other Computer-Recycling Options include:
    • Apple offers free mail-in recycling of any brand computer when you purchase any qualifying Apple computer or monitor.
    • Dell offers free recycling of Dell products.
    • Recycle Sony products free by dropping them off at a Waste Management Facility:
    • PRTR Inc. Transfer Station
      791 Boston Post Rd. (Rt. 20), East Marlboro, MA 01752
      RCI Fitchburg Landfill
      101 Fitchburg Road (Rt. 31), Westminster, MA 01473
    • Staples recycles computers for $10 per piece: 571 Boston Turnpike,
      Shrewsbury | 70 Worcester Providence Tpke, Millbury
    • The Toshiba trade-in program provides you with a way to trade-in or recycle used, working, technology products in exchange for a refund by mail. If your item is no longer functioning, or has no trade-in value, it can be responsibly recycled for the cost of shipping.
    • eBay: Sell computers, cellular phones, cameras and audio equipment
    • Facebook users can now sell things via the Facebook Marketplace.
  • Before donating your computer, check out Tech Soup’s tips for donation.
    The following foundations are currently accepting computers:
    • TecsChange is a volunteer-led nonprofit organization. Call 617-442-4456 before dropping your computer off to be sure they will accept your model. Location: 83 Highland Street, Roxbury MA
    • Youth Build Boston’s wish list includes computers. Call them to arrange logistics at 617-445-8887.
  • Tufts Facilities Services recycles each and every bulb which burn out or break on campus. If your office requires a bulb to be changed or recycled, please contact Facilities Services at x63535 (Boston) or 508.839.7921 (Grafton). Unfortunately, we cannot accept lightbulbs from individual residences outside of Tufts. Please contact your city’s municipal recycling program or check out Earth911.com for local dropoff sites.
    Fluorescent bulbs and tubes are a more eco-friendly way of lighting up our world. Fluorescent light bulbs use less energy and have longer lives than thegeneral service incandescent bulbs. Buying compact fluorescent lamps are cost-efficient too; one CFL can save you up to $40 worth of electricity costs over the lamp’s lifetime!
    However, they still need to be recycled properly. As these bulbs and tubes do contain a small amount of mercury, the EPA has set disposal regulations on the disposal of fluorescents. All Tufts fluorescent bulbs and tubes are recycled by Veolia Environmental Services. For more information, please visit www.epa.gov.

    Fluorescent bulbs and tubes are Tufts Recycles! Approved! We strongly support the use of compact fluorescent bulbs and tubes because they are much more energy efficient than regular bulbs.Although they have mercury in them, they actually help reduce more mercury emissions from power plants. Why?A substantial part of the electricity in MA is made by burning coal. Coal naturally contains mercury that is released when burned. Because fluorescent lamps use so much less electricity, the mercury that is in them is actually less than what would have been released into the air at the coal power plant if regular bulbs had been used. Learn more about energy efficiency, climate change and what Tufts is doing at http://sustainability.tufts.edu/.

  • We recycle high pressure mercury arc lamps used in projectors. Email us if you would like us to pick up a bulb from your office.
  • For more information about recycling and other environmental issues on the Grafton Campus, contact Gretchen Kaufman at gretchen.kaufman@tufts.edu, or at 508-839-7918 x84913.

    Click for information on Medford and Boston campuses.