Tagged: social justice
Panel speaks on how planners can make black lives matter
| October 26, 2016 | 11:34 am | Tufts, UEP | Comments closed

Planning processes are not democratic, said Bob Terrell, executive director at the Fair Housing Center of Greater Boston.

“If you’re serious about real political empowerment and economic empowerment, why aren’t you hiring people from this community who have the skills and the background to do any and all research?” said Terrell. “I have yet to see a municipality that will turn over real decision-making power to its citizens and residents.”

To make black lives matter, Terrell said, planners need to look to the community rather than seeking outside consultants.

“There is no such thing as value-free social science,” Terrell said during a UEP colloquium about Making Black Lives Matter through Policy and Planning on October 19.

Policy work and activism are not mutually exclusive, said Melissa Colón, a doctoral student at the Tufts Child Studies and Human Development department, and former executive director of Massachusetts Education Initiative for Latino Students. She added that leaders need to disrupt education systems that continue to oppress some of its students. School is supposed to be an equalizer, she said.

Drawing on his own life, panelist Abrigal Forrester illustrated how the education system devalued him and his peers.

Forrester, who is now the director of Community Action at Madison Park Community Development Corporation, said he always performed well academically, but was never vetted for opportunities to attend technical schools.

“It really made me feel like, why am I doing all this when I’m not getting the recognition?” Forrester said. He added that many like him engaged in a “devaluing of self through the system.”

Forrester recalled his friend Walter, who frequently stole cars and was eventually killed by law enforcement. The next day, Walter was not at school and everyone knew why.

“There was no discussion about what we all knew about losing Walter. We just said, ‘Wow, Walter’s gone.’ Is anybody going to talk to us?” Forrester said. “We’re losing children every day and no one’s saying, ‘Let’s stop your academics for a minute and allow this process to heal. Do we really matter when you don’t give our children a chance to stop and allow them to grieve?”

Offering some advice, Colón asserted that students of urban planning and policy should not accept theory or facts as a given.

“I don’t believe in neutrality — you can either stand up for racial justice or you’re complicit to the oppression of others,” Colón said.

Tufts UEP students can access a video of the full colloquium session on Trunk, in the UEP students site, under Media Gallery.

Sharing the Work and Research of James Jennings
| April 4, 2015 | 6:57 pm | Events | Comments closed

Toward Racial Equality and Social Justice

This Wednesday, April 8, Tufts UEP and the Tufts Consortium on Studies in Race, Colonialism, and Diaspora is hosting a symposium in celebration of  Dr. Jennings work and research. The event will feature current and former colleagues, and a panel discussion. Register for the event here.

Details:

When: Wednesday, April 8th, 2015. 4:45pm to 7:30pm

Where: Barnum 008, 163 Packard Ave at Tufts University Medford Campus

Speakers:

  • Julia Jordan-Zachary, Associate Professor and Director of Black Studies Program at Providence College
  • Miren Uriarte, Professor of Human Services and Senior Research Associate at the Mauricio Gastón Institute for Latino Community Development and Public Policy at University of Massachusetts Boston
  • Fran Jacobs, Associate Professor at the Department of Urban and Environmental Planning and Policy at Tufts University
  • Chris Jones, Executive Director at Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative
  • Pearl Robinson, Associate Professor of Politics, Africa, and African-American Politics at Tufts University
  • Nina Gaeta Coletta, Family Center Director at East Boston High School
Jenny Molina ’13 is drawn to UEP’s core values
| July 11, 2011 | 12:00 am | first impressions | Comments closed

This post comes to you from Jenny Molina, an incoming UEP student. You can see other perspectives of incoming students by clicking on “First Impressions” in the “Categories” menu.

Over the last 10 years or so, my entire family has reminded me about how my undergrad decision process was one of the most painful processes of their lives! Looking back, it’s possibly, somewhat, mildly accurate…. I was unsure about lots of things in early adulthood, including where and what I would be studying, and it became just that – a process.

On the flipside, choosing a graduate school was an exciting time and actually gave me butterflies! I realized that I needed a program that would challenge and prepare me for the public service sector. I chose UEP over other nationally recognized programs because I feel personally connected to the program’s core principles and values, as well as the program’s ability to challenge and empower students to focus on their passions and professional ambitions. During my visit, I gravitated towards the program’s interdisciplinary focus and the visible partnership of talented faculty and students who support the approach in developing both practitioners and researchers.

My decision to pursue a degree at UEP stems from a series of distinct yet interrelated personal experiences. My extensive travels after my undergraduate studies led me to better understand personally meaningful values while challenging my beliefs regarding the function of cities around the world. I was fortunate enough to play soccer for the Mexican National Team – playing teams all over the world and participating in the 2004 Athens Olympic Games.

Upon my return to the United States I explored my interest in landscape architecture and saw the impact large urban projects have on both land use and overall aesthetics at the city and neighborhood level. My passion for social justice soon drove me to investigate my interests in community health at multiple organizations that examine urban health through the lenses of human rights and social justice. For the past 4 years my community work has involved managing a heath center wellness program that focuses on nutrition education, physical activity, and food access. With this job I have had the opportunity to work directly with city agencies, nonprofit organizations, civic leaders, and city residents to focus community voice and action.

In the coming months I will be farming full time in Metro-Boston, as well as volunteering with various nonprofits in the city of Boston. This fall I am particularly excited to learn from my fellow classmates and engage in thoughtful and challenging dialogues. Though I will miss working in the communities closest to my heart, I am excited and committed to take on a new chapter in my academic career at Tufts University.