Emergency Critical Care

Clinical trials for Emergency Critical Care specialty

  • Status:  Currently enrolling

    Description:                                                                                                                                                                                The purpose of this study is to better understand what causes gastric dilatation and volvulus (GDV) in dogs. GDV, or bloat, is a common condition in large and giant breed dogs. Due to the importance of GDV in many dog breeds, several large previous studies have investigated potential risk factors for the development of GDV.It is known that there is no single cause for GDV, rather its occurrence is multifactorial, with both genetic and environmental factors contributing. As well as a genetic analysis we want to see if dogs with GDV have different types or amounts of proteins, hormones and other molecules in their blood and tissue, or different bacteria in their gastrointestinal tract.

    We will enroll dogs in five groups:

    1. Dogs with acute GDV
    2. Dogs with chronic bloat and/or gastric instability
    3. Dogs with acute gastric outflow or small intestinal obstruction secondary to foreign material
    4. Healthy control dogs
    5. Euthanized control dogs; and
    6. Euthanized dogs with GDV or gastrointestinal foreign body obstruction

    Inclusion/Exclusion Criteria:

    Group a)  Dogs with Acute GDV

    Inclusion criteria:  Dogs with GDV confirmed via a right lateral abdominal radiograph

    Exclusion criteria:  none

    Group b)  Dogs with chronic bloat

    Inclusion criteria:  Clinical signs consistent with chronic bloat

    Exclusion criteria:  GDV at any time

    Group c) Dogs with acute GI obstruction secondary to foreign material

    Inclusion criteria:  Dogs with GI obstruction secondary to foreign material that require exploratory laparotomy.

    Exclusion criteria:  History of GDV. GI perforation.,  Non-obstructive foreign body that does not require surgery

    Group d) Healthy control dogs

    Inclusion criteria:  Healthy

    Exclusion criteria:  History of GDV

    Group e) Euthanized control dogs

    Inclusion criteria:  Euthanized donated dogs

    Exclusion criteria:  History of GDV

    Group f) Euthanized dogs with GDV or GI foreign body obstruction

    Inclusion criteria:  Dogs that will be euthanized after a diagnosis of GDV confirmed via a right lateral abdominal radiograph, or GI obstruction secondary to foreign material confirmed via abdominal radiographs or ultrasound.

    Exclusion criteria: Surgical treatment of GDV or GI obstruction

    Client Benefits:

    This study will not cover any of the costs associated with treating your dog; although all study related sample collection and analysis is covered by the study. As such, the cost of treatment is the same regardless of whether your dog is enrolled in the study. Your dog’s participation will allow us to gain information which will help us to develop a better understanding of why some large and giant breed dogs develop GDV.

    Contact Information:

    For questions regarding the clinical trial please email the clinical trials technician, Diane Welsh at: clinicaltrials@tufts.edu

     

     

  • Status:  Currently enrolling

    Description:

    The success of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is very low, in veterinary (as well as human) patients. Even after successful return to spontaneous circulation, sequela to CPR include repeated cardiac arrest, brain disease, and multi-organ system failure. Low oxygen levels to the brain is the major factor contributing to these poor outcomes. There is a critical gap in our understanding of the physiology and prognosis after CPR, which has led to failure to substantially improve our success in dealing with this problem.

    An important goal of this study is to understand how chemicals called nucleic acids (RNA) are altered in post-CPR canine patients. The study will focus on very small RNA (miRNA). The specific objective of this study is to understand which miRNA are released into the circulation of canine patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) versus non-CPR patients hospitalized in the ICU for other reasons.

    There is tremendous potential value in identifying circulating miRNA after CPR. First, miRNA may assist in predicting outcome (prognosticating) in individual patients in the future. Second, miRNAreleased into the circulation are indicators of major epigenetic disturbances as a consequence of hypoxia-ischemia.    Knowledge of these miRNA may lead to the design of novel therapies to counteract these effects, for example employing stem cells that release mitigating miRNA.

    Inclusion Criteria:

    Group 1:  Six dogs that have undergone CPR according to standard protocols in the TCSVM emergency room and have returned to spontaneous circulation for a minimum of 1 hr.

    Group 2:  Six dogs hospitalized in the ICU that have not experienced CPR or significant hypoxemia or ischemia (e.g. GDV, hemorrhage, stroke) will be selected for sampling at the same time (AM vs. PM). Dogs will be similar age and gender as post-CPR patient.

    Any breed is acceptable.

    Exclusion Criteria:

    • Dogs < 10 kg
    • Dogs with prior hypoxemia insult (prior arrest or CPR, GDV, stroke, hemorrhagic shock, congestive heart failure, etc).
    • Dogs with a diagnosis of cancer
    • Dogs with hemolytic disease
    • Dogs for which blood sampling is contraindicated (recent fluid/colloid resuscitation)

     

    Client Benefits:

    The study will cover the cost of a blood panel (NOVA) at the same time the sample is being collected; this is testing that is normally performed every few hours during recovery from CPR, it is also testing that is normally performed in sick dogs. Your pet’s participation will also allow us to gain information which will help in the treatment of other dogs with this condition. You understand that your animal’s participation in this study may not alleviate or cure his/her ailment

    Contact Information:

    For questions regarding the clinical trial please email the clinical trials technician, Diane Welsh at: clinicaltrials@tufts.edu