Cats

Clinical trials for cats

  • Description

    To investigate and identify occult coagulation disorders in cats with cholestatic liver disease before any procedures (FNA, biopsy, surgery, e-tube placement).

    Inclusion Criteria

    serum bilirubin >/= 3, ALT/ALP > 2x upper limit of reference range.

    Exclusion Criteria

    PCV < 28%, obvious neoplasia, heart disease, icterus due to sepsis or hemolysis, meds (NSAIDs, steroids, fatty acids).

    Client Benefits

    PT/PTT, plt count, pcv/ts, and TEG

    Contact Information

    Gideon.Daniel@tufts.edu

  • Purpose of Study”: The cancer that most commonly affects the mouth of cats is called oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC).  This cancer is common and responds poorly to treatment.  The average life-expectancy for cats diagnosed with this cancer is about 6 months with only 10-20% of cats alive 1 year after diagnosis.  Cats may exhibit a number of problems as a result of OSCC including a swelling in the head/throat, lack of appetite, difficulty eating or swallowing, decreased grooming behavior, excessive salivation, foul odor to breath, change in voice or difficulty in vocalizing. The purpose of this study is to determine if a drug called “Anginex” would provide a safe and effective means of treating OSCC in cats. Anginex is a peptide (small protein) that interferes with the ability of a tumor to make and maintain its blood supply, a process known as angiogenesis.  Cancer drugs that target the blood supply of a tumor are called “anti-angiogenic “or “anti-vascular” agents.  Because tumors need a blood supply to grow beyond microscopic size, inhibiting angiogenesis prevents tumors from growing and can cause tumors to shrink.  Anginex has been used in mice experimentally.  In this current study, our goals are to ensure that this agent is safe for cats and also to determine whether it has any effects on the tumor and its blood vessels and oxygen levels.

    Inclusion Criteria:

    1.  Cats with a diagnosis of OSCC.
    2. Cats that have not received radiation or chemotherapy (including Palladia) for treatment of the cancer.
    3. The tumor has not been surgically removed.
    4. The tumor is measurable and accessible.

    Exclusion Criteria:

    1. Cats with other systemic diseases that are uncontrolled and likely to compromise the ability of the cat to complete treatment.
    2. Tumors that are not readily accessible to biopsy and other procedures.

    Client Benefits: The study will cover the costs of certain diagnostic tests and treatment.  These include: biopsy and pathologist evaluation of tissue, blood and urine evaluation, advanced imaging with PET/MRI and CT, which can aide in future treatments of the tumor such as surgery or radiation therapy. The study will not cover the cost of the initial consultation with the oncology service.

    Contact Information: To make an appointment with the oncology department please call the oncology liason, Kelly Reed at 508-887-4682 For questions regarding the clinical trial please email the clinical trials technician, Diane Welsh at: clinicaltrials@tufts.edu

  • Description:

    Previous studies on laboratory mice show a decrease in growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11) in the circulating blood of old mice with age-related myocardial hypertrophy compared with young mice with normal cardiac structure.  The goal of this study is to see if the same GDF11 deficiency is also seen in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM).  We will be looking for cats with HCM and cats with normal heart structure to determine if there is a significant difference in the GDF11 concentration between the two groups.

    Inclusion Criteria:

    Cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM)

    Cats with normal heart structure

    Exclusion Criteria:

    Cats that become overly stressed or anxious during the echocardiogram

    Client Benefits:

    The study will pay for the cost of the exam and echocardiogram.  Your cat’s participation in the study will also allow us to gain information which will help in the management and treatment of other cats with HCM

    Contact Information:

    For questions regarding the clinical trial please email the clinical trials technician, Diane Welsh at: clinicaltrials@tufts.edu

  • Description:

    A common concurrent condition often appreciated in feline CKD patients is cardiac disease. High rate fluid therapy to treat azotemia puts these patients at risk for congestive heart failure( CHF). Anecdotally at Tufts, an improvement in azotemia, appetite and attitude has been noted in cats treated for cardiac disease with pimobendan that also have kidney disease. We would like to assess tolerability of pimobendan and possible benefits in patients with CKD, IRIS stage 3 or 4. Investigating these initial clinical observations with a larger study will help establish whether pimobendan could be a novel treatment for cats with kidney disease. Benefits could include decreased hospitalization time, improved appetite, improved kidney perfusion with reduced azotemia, and the ability to treat kidney disease while simultaneously protecting against CHF in patients with concurrent cardiac disease.

    Inclusion Criteria:

    Cats with IRIS stage 3 or 4 CKD at the time of hospital admission will be included in this study. After 24 to 72 hours of fluids, once dehydration is judged to be largely resolved (<5% dehydrated), cats would be eligible to enter one of two groups receiving the standard of care and either benazepril or pimobendan.

    Cats with concurrent cardiac disease that are not currently receiving cardiac medications and are not experiencing signs of CHF at presentation, including respiratory distress or oxygen dependence, will be allowed to participate in this study.

    Exclusion Criteria:

    Cats with comorbid conditions (i.e. diabetes mellitus, liver failure, neoplasia, ureteral obstruction, and acute kidney injury that requires dialysis), those unwilling to take oral medication (i.e. vomiting, fractious), and cats with hypotension (blood pressure <120 mmHg) will be excluded from this study.

    Any cats experiencing unusual agitation, anorexia, vomiting >2 times, worsening of low blood pressure (<120mmHg), worsening of existing cardiac disease, diagnostic evidence of progression of kidney disease (increased BUN/creatinine), or side effects that adversely affect quality of life after starting the study drug will be removed from this study.

    Client Benefits:

    The study will cover some of the costs of CKD care, including one set of recheck blood work, blood pressure, urine evaluation, and cardiac evaluation using echocardiographic technique at no additional charge. Your animal will not be subjected to additional diagnostic tests than is standard for monitoring CKD patients. All other costs for treatment of CKD will be incurred by you. Your pet’s participation will also allow us to gain information which will help in treatment of other cats with this condition.

    Contact Information:

    For questions regarding the clinical trial please email the clinical trials technician, Diane Welsh at: clinicaltrials@tufts.edu

  • Description:

    The liver performs an essential role in absorption of dietary vitamin D and synthesis of the active form of vitamin D. Vitamin D deficiency is a known problem in people with liver disease and these patients routinely receive supplementation.  Vitamin D deficiency has not been documented in cats with liver disease.  Our goal is to determine if cats with primary liver disease have low levels of vitamin D.  If they do this finding could lead to the development of clinical guidelines for vitamin D supplementation.

     Inclusion Criteria:

    Cats over 1 year of age with one of the following:

    • Hyperbilirubinemia
    • Elevated ALT and/or ALP
    • Cytologic or histopathologic diagnosis of a primary hepatobiliary disease

    Exclusion Criteria:

    • Hyperthyroidism
    • Acute pancreatitis
    • IRIS Stage 2 chronic kidney disease (creatinine >1.6 mg/dl)
    • Congestive heart failure
    • Hypercalcemia (elevated ionized calcium)
    • Corticosteroid or ursodeoxcholic acid administration within the last 2 weeks

     

    Client Benefits:

    The study will cover the cost of the vitamin D panel. Your cat’s participation will also allow us to gain information which will help in the treatment of other cats with this condition

    Contact information:

    For questions regarding the clinical trial please email the clinical trials technician, Diane Welsh at: clinicaltrials@tufts.edu

  • Description:

    The goal of this study is to develop a simple screening method, useful in practice, for the widespread detection of early cardiomyopathy in cats. Cardiac disease is particularly frustrating in cats, as cats may have normal heart sounds, but severe heart disease, or very abnormal heart sounds and no clinically significant disease. Echocardiography (ECHO) by a cardiologist is the gold standard for determination of heart disease in cats; however, ECHO is not widely available and may be cost –prohibitive. Biomarkers, specifically NT pro-BNP and troponin have been introduced and validated for documentation of heart disease in cats, but have not been widely evaluated in apparently healthy pet cats. Our goal is to teach a screening echo – Frontline Cardiac UltraSound –FOCUS to participants, and compare the predictive value of practitioner performed FOCUS exam, physical examination, EKG analysis and biomarker assessment for determining the presence or absence of heart disease with the gold standard of ECHO by a cardiologist.

    Inclusion Criteria:

     Animals to be included:

    a. Species: Feline

    b. Sex: Any

    c. Age Range any greater > 1 year

    d. Weight Range Any; expected to be greater than 4 kg.

     

    Client Benefits:

    The study will cover all of the costs of this study, physical exam, EKG, echocardiogram, biomarker blood test.  Your pet’s participation will also allow us to gain information that will help in the early identification of heart disease in cats. If we diagnose heart disease in your cat, we may be able to institute treatment earlier than we would otherwise have been able to do. You understand that your animal’s participation in this study may not alleviate or cure his/her ailment.

     

    Contact information:

    For questions regarding the clinical trial please email the clinical trials technician, Diane Welsh at: clinicaltrials@tufts.edu