Cats

Clinical trials for cats

  • Status:  Not currently enrolling

    Purpose of Study”: The cancer that most commonly affects the mouth of cats is called oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC).  This cancer is common and responds poorly to treatment.  The average life-expectancy for cats diagnosed with this cancer is about 6 months with only 10-20% of cats alive 1 year after diagnosis.  Cats may exhibit a number of problems as a result of OSCC including a swelling in the head/throat, lack of appetite, difficulty eating or swallowing, decreased grooming behavior, excessive salivation, foul odor to breath, change in voice or difficulty in vocalizing. The purpose of this study is to determine if a drug called “Anginex” would provide a safe and effective means of treating OSCC in cats. Anginex is a peptide (small protein) that interferes with the ability of a tumor to make and maintain its blood supply, a process known as angiogenesis.  Cancer drugs that target the blood supply of a tumor are called “anti-angiogenic “or “anti-vascular” agents.  Because tumors need a blood supply to grow beyond microscopic size, inhibiting angiogenesis prevents tumors from growing and can cause tumors to shrink.  Anginex has been used in mice experimentally.  In this current study, our goals are to ensure that this agent is safe for cats and also to determine whether it has any effects on the tumor and its blood vessels and oxygen levels.

    Inclusion Criteria:

    1.  Cats with a diagnosis of OSCC.
    2. Cats that have not received radiation or chemotherapy (including Palladia) for treatment of the cancer.
    3. The tumor has not been surgically removed.
    4. The tumor is measurable and accessible.

    Exclusion Criteria:

    1. Cats with other systemic diseases that are uncontrolled and likely to compromise the ability of the cat to complete treatment.
    2. Tumors that are not readily accessible to biopsy and other procedures.

    Client Benefits: The study will cover the costs of certain diagnostic tests and treatment.  These include: biopsy and pathologist evaluation of tissue, blood and urine evaluation, advanced imaging with PET/MRI and CT, which can aide in future treatments of the tumor such as surgery or radiation therapy. The study will not cover the cost of the initial consultation with the oncology service.

    Contact Information: To make an appointment with the oncology department please call the oncology liason, Kelly Reed at 508-887-4682 For questions regarding the clinical trial please email the clinical trials technician, Diane Welsh at:  clinicaltrials@tufts.edu

  • Status: Currently enrolling cats with normal heart structure;  Cats with HCM full enrolled

    Description:

    Previous studies on laboratory mice show a decrease in growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11) in the circulating blood of old mice with age-related myocardial hypertrophy compared with young mice with normal cardiac structure.  The goal of this study is to see if the same GDF11 deficiency is also seen in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM).  We will be looking for cats with HCM and cats with normal heart structure to determine if there is a significant difference in the GDF11 concentration between the two groups.

    Inclusion Criteria:

    Cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM)

    Cats with normal heart structure

    Exclusion Criteria:

    Cats that become overly stressed or anxious during the echocardiogram

    Client Benefits:

    The study will pay for the cost of the exam and echocardiogram.  Your cat’s participation in the study will also allow us to gain information which will help in the management and treatment of other cats with HCM

    Contact Information:

    For questions regarding the clinical trial please email the clinical trials technician, Diane Welsh at:  clinicaltrials@tufts.edu

  • Status:  Fully enrolled

    Description:

    The liver performs an essential role in absorption of dietary vitamin D and synthesis of the active form of vitamin D. Vitamin D deficiency is a known problem in people with liver disease and these patients routinely receive supplementation.  Vitamin D deficiency has not been documented in cats with liver disease.  Our goal is to determine if cats with primary liver disease have low levels of vitamin D.  If they do this finding could lead to the development of clinical guidelines for vitamin D supplementation.

     Inclusion Criteria:

    Cats over 1 year of age with one of the following:

    • Hyperbilirubinemia
    • Elevated ALT and/or ALP
    • Cytologic or histopathologic diagnosis of a primary hepatobiliary disease

    Exclusion Criteria:

    • Hyperthyroidism
    • Acute pancreatitis
    • IRIS Stage 2 chronic kidney disease (creatinine >1.6 mg/dl)
    • Congestive heart failure
    • Hypercalcemia (elevated ionized calcium)
    • Corticosteroid or ursodeoxcholic acid administration within the last 2 weeks

     

    Client Benefits:

    The study will cover the cost of the vitamin D panel. Your cat’s participation will also allow us to gain information which will help in the treatment of other cats with this condition

    Contact information:

    For questions regarding the clinical trial please email the clinical trials technician, Diane Welsh at:  clinicaltrials@tufts.edu

     

  • Status:  Currently enrolling clinics

    Description:

    The goal of this study is to develop a simple screening method, useful in practice, for the widespread detection of early cardiomyopathy in cats. Cardiac disease is particularly frustrating in cats, as cats may have normal heart sounds, but severe heart disease, or very abnormal heart sounds and no clinically significant disease. Echocardiography (ECHO) by a cardiologist is the gold standard for determination of heart disease in cats; however, ECHO is not widely available and may be cost –prohibitive. Biomarkers, specifically NT pro-BNP and troponin have been introduced and validated for documentation of heart disease in cats, but have not been widely evaluated in apparently healthy pet cats. Our goal is to teach a screening echo – Frontline Cardiac UltraSound –FOCUS to participants, and compare the predictive value of practitioner performed FOCUS exam, physical examination, EKG analysis and biomarker assessment for determining the presence or absence of heart disease with the gold standard of ECHO by a cardiologist.

    Inclusion Criteria:

     Animals to be included:

    a. Species: Feline

    b. Sex: Any

    c. Age Range any greater > 1 year

    d. Weight Range Any; expected to be greater than 4 kg.

     

    Client Benefits:

    The study will cover all of the costs of this study, physical exam, EKG, echocardiogram, biomarker blood test.  Your pet’s participation will also allow us to gain information that will help in the early identification of heart disease in cats. If we diagnose heart disease in your cat, we may be able to institute treatment earlier than we would otherwise have been able to do. You understand that your animal’s participation in this study may not alleviate or cure his/her ailment.

     

    Contact information:

    For questions regarding the clinical trial please email the clinical trials technician, Diane Welsh at: clinicaltrials@tufts.edu

     

  • Tufts researchers are studying what pet owners think about pet health and treatment. Will you take an 8 minute survey to help us provide better care for pets in the future? 

     

    Survey Link: http://bit.ly/21UWPa0

     

     

     

  • Status: Currently enrolling

    Description:

    Hyperammonemia has been documented in several disease states in cats, but no studies have systematically evaluated blood ammonia levels in cats with renal azotemia.  The objective of this pilot study will be to document blood ammonia levels in cats that present for evaluation of renal azotemia. We hypothesize that fasting blood ammonia will correlate with the blood urea nitrogen and creatinine in these cats.

    The blood ammonia level will be available for interpretation by the investigator within 2-3 hours of blood collection. If hyperammonemia is documented, we will enact therapy to decrease the blood ammonia level during the hospitalization stay.  We will also be measuring serum B12 (cobalamin) levels and if these are low, we can supplement the cats. Beyond benefit to the enrolled cats, this study will direct the design of a future study to evaluate if the results are repeatable in a larger population

    Inclusion Criteria:

    Cats with the confirmed presence of renal azotemia on labwork (IRIS Stage ≥ 2: creatinine ≥ 1.6 mg/dL) that either have a history of previous kidney disease, or are newly diagnosed.

    Exclusion Criteria:

    Cats with previously diagnosed concurrent disease states known to have increased ammonia levels will be excluded from the study (e.g. congenital portosystemic shunts, previously documented cobalamin deficiency); however, cats will be screened for a cobalamin deficiency in the event the deficiency is undiagnosed.                                    In addition cats on medications known to decrease blood ammonia (antibiotics, lactulose) will be excluded.

    Client Benefits:

    The cost of the blood ammonia and cobalamin levels will be covered by the study.Your pet’s participation will also allow us to gain information which could help in the diagnosis, management, and treatment of other cats with this condition.

    Contact information:

    For questions regarding the clinical trial please email the clinical trials technician, Diane Welsh at:  clinicaltrials@tufts.edu

  • Status:  Currently enrolling

    Description:

    We hypothesize that the orally administered drug, bexagliflozin, will improve glycemic control in poorly regulated diabetic cats. The primary objective of this study is to determine if mean blood sugar and fructosamine concentrations decrease by ≥10% with administration of bexagliflozin over a two week period. The secondary objective is to determine if bexagliflozin is well tolerated by poorly regulated diabetic cats.

    Inclusion Criteria:

    Cats with unregulated diabetes mellitus based on history of persistent hyperglycemia(>250 mg/dl) and appropriate clinical signs, including polyuria, polydipsia and weight loss

    Exclusion Criteria:

    Cats with documented azotemia, elevated bilirubin, ALT >2.5x the upper limit of normal, diabetic ketoacidosis, urinary tract infection, use of corticosteroids within the past 8 weeks, heart disease requiring medication and uncontrolled hyperthyroidism based on preliminary laboratory testing

    Client benefits:

    The study will cover the costs of blood work and urine tests required for the study, blood pressure measurement, day boarding as well as the cost of the medication.  We will be teaching you how to monitor your cat’s blood glucose levels at home with a hand held glucometer that will be loaned from our hospital for the duration of the study.

    Contact information:

    For questions regarding the clinical trial please email the clinical trials technician, Diane Welsh at: clinicaltrials@tufts.edu