Cats

Clinical trials for cats

  • Status:  Currently enrolling clinics

    Description:

    The goal of this study is to develop a simple screening method, useful in practice, for the widespread detection of early cardiomyopathy in cats. Cardiac disease is particularly frustrating in cats, as cats may have normal heart sounds, but severe heart disease, or very abnormal heart sounds and no clinically significant disease. Echocardiography (ECHO) by a cardiologist is the gold standard for determination of heart disease in cats; however, ECHO is not widely available and may be cost –prohibitive. Biomarkers, specifically NT pro-BNP and troponin have been introduced and validated for documentation of heart disease in cats, but have not been widely evaluated in apparently healthy pet cats. Our goal is to teach a screening echo - Frontline Cardiac UltraSound –FOCUS to participants, and compare the predictive value of practitioner performed FOCUS exam, physical examination, EKG analysis and biomarker assessment for determining the presence or absence of heart disease with the gold standard of ECHO by a cardiologist.

    Inclusion Criteria:

     Animals to be included:

    a. Species: Feline

    b. Sex: Any

    c. Age Range any greater > 1 year

    d. Weight Range Any; expected to be greater than 4 kg.

     

    Client Benefits:

    The study will cover all of the costs of this study, physical exam, EKG, echocardiogram, biomarker blood test.  Your pet’s participation will also allow us to gain information that will help in the early identification of heart disease in cats. If we diagnose heart disease in your cat, we may be able to institute treatment earlier than we would otherwise have been able to do. You understand that your animal’s participation in this study may not alleviate or cure his/her ailment.

     

    Contact information:

    For questions regarding the clinical trial please email the clinical trials technician, Diane Welsh at: clinicaltrials@tufts.edu

     

  • Status:  Currently enrolling

    Description:

    We hypothesize that the orally administered drug, bexagliflozin, will improve glycemic control in poorly regulated diabetic cats. The primary objective of this study is to determine if mean blood sugar and fructosamine concentrations decrease by ≥10% with administration of bexagliflozin over a two week period. The secondary objective is to determine if bexagliflozin is well tolerated by poorly regulated diabetic cats.

    Inclusion Criteria:

    Cats with unregulated diabetes mellitus based on history of persistent hyperglycemia(>250 mg/dl) and appropriate clinical signs, including polyuria, polydipsia and weight loss

    Exclusion Criteria:

    Cats with documented azotemia, elevated bilirubin, ALT >2.5x the upper limit of normal, diabetic ketoacidosis, urinary tract infection, use of corticosteroids within the past 8 weeks, heart disease requiring medication and uncontrolled hyperthyroidism based on preliminary laboratory testing

    Client benefits:

    The study will cover the costs of blood work and urine tests required for the study, blood pressure measurement, day boarding as well as the cost of the medication.  We will be teaching you how to monitor your cat's blood glucose levels at home with a hand held glucometer that will be loaned from our hospital for the duration of the study.

    Contact information:

    For questions regarding the clinical trial please email the clinical trials technician, Diane Welsh at: clinicaltrials@tufts.edu

  • CSRC Protocol # 004.17

    Status:  Currently enrolling

    Description:

    Vitamin D has long been known to play an important role in regulating bone and calcium metabolism. However, vitamin D also is associated with other body systems and disease conditions. There is growing recognition of associations between vitamin D status and cardiovascular diseases in people, including hypertension and heart disease leading to heart failure.  Vitamin D has been shown to have several cardioprotective effects.  In people with cardiovascular disease, vitamin D deficiency is associated with disease progression and poor prognosis.

    Recently, two studies in dogs with heart failure have identified lower vitamin D concentrations compared to healthy controls, and it appears that this may be associated with worse outcomes . It is not known whether cats with heart disease have low levels of vitamin D compared to normal cats, and if so, whether an association exists between vitamin D status and disease severity . Cardiomyopathies are common heart diseases in cats, affecting 10-15% of all cats.

    Inclusion Criteria:

    Cats with dilated, hypertrophic, restrictive, or unclassified cardiomyopathies of any stage of severity and with no other major disease conditions

    Client benefits:

    The study covers the cost of 4 blood tests (packed cell volume, total solids, Azo-Stix, and glucose). Blood for these tests will be analyzed immediately so that information can be used to assist in the care of the individual cat. In addition, your cat's participation will allow us to gain information which will help in the diagnosis and treatment of other cats with heart disease. You understand that your cat's participation in this study may not alleviate or cure his/her condition.

    Contact information:

    For questions regarding the clinical trial please email the clinical trials technician, Diane Welsh at:  clinicaltrials@tufts.edu